How to Get More Vitamin D in Your Diet

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How to Get More Vitamin D in Your Diet
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How to Get More Vitamin D in Your Diet

My skin is starting to take on that sickly glow of mid-Autumn. The sun has taken back its kisses, and I am left with a greener shade of pale.

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As we pine after the healthy look of summer skin and search for the perfect bronzer to compensate, we should also be searching for foods high in vitamin D. The weaker intensity of its rays and the earlier setting of the sun, combined with less time spent outdoors puts us at risk for vitamin D deficiency. Long known to be essential for our body’s ability to absorb calcium, more recent studies have revealed the importance of this vitamin for the immune system, cardiovascular health, cancer prevention and for warding off depression.

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Vitamin D isn’t abundant in many foods, therefore a thoughtful approach to increasing your family’s intake this winter is necessary.

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Here's the breakdown for daily recommendations of vitamin D:

Between ages 1 and 70 years old – 600IU/day

Ages 71 and over – 800IU/day

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Fish

The best way to get vitamin D naturally in your diet is to increase your family’s fish intake. Raw fish and caviar, fatty fishes and fish canned in oil contain the most vitamin D.

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Salami, ham and sausage

If you are feeling a little guilty about eating these meats not known for their health benefits, focus on what they are doing for your vitamin D levels.

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Eggs

Two large eggs provide about 10% of your daily recommended intake.

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Mushrooms

All mushrooms contain vitamin D, but white button mushrooms provide the most.

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Fortified foods

Many cereals are fortified, but make sure to check the labels. I checked the healthy cereals in my pantry and half of them don’t contain vitamin D.

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Milk and Juice

Eight ounces of vitamin D fortified milk or juice will give you a quarter of your daily requirement.

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If you are concerned about your vitamin D levels, your doctor can perform a simple blood test to check if you are getting enough.

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If you are at an increased risk of osteoporosis, your doctor may recommend higher levels.

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Talk to your kids about the health properties of the foods you make for them. It is important for their lifelong relationship with food to understand the health benefits that can be gained by eating right.

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My skin is starting to take on that sickly glow of mid-Autumn. The sun has taken back its kisses, and I am left with a greener shade of pale.

As we pine after the healthy look of summer skin and search for the perfect bronzer to compensate, we should also be searching for foods high in vitamin D. The weaker intensity of its rays and the earlier setting of the sun, combined with less time spent outdoors puts us at risk for vitamin D deficiency. Long known to be essential for our body's ability to absorb calcium, more recent studies have revealed the importance of this vitamin for the immune system, cardiovascular health, cancer prevention and for warding off depression.

Check out the slideshow above to discover what foods you should eat to prevent vitamin D deficiency.

Expert Approved Karen Latimer

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