How to Buy, Store and Eat In-Season Winter Fruit

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How to Buy, Store and Eat In-Season Winter Fruit
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How to Buy, Store and Eat In-Season Winter Fruit

View the slideshow to learn how to select the best winter fruits and what to do with them.

Winter Fruits: Cranberries

How to choose: Select cranberries that are plump, shiny and intensely colored. Before using, discard any berries that are shriveled, soft or brown.

How to store: Cranberries will keep for up to two months in the refrigerator if they’re tightly covered or in their original packaging. Frozen berries can last up to a year.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Pears


How to choose: Pears should be firm, but should yield gently to pressure. Look for skin that is smooth and fruit that is unbruised.

How to store: Unripe pears can be stored at room temperature. To speed up the ripening process, place pears in a brown bag. Once ripe, pears should be kept refrigerated in a plastic bag, where they’ll last for about five days.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Blood Oranges

How to choose: Choose blood oranges like you would any orange. Look for oranges that are heavy for their size and have a thin skin, indicating a lot of juice.

How to store: Blood oranges taste best at room temperature, but if you need to store your oranges for a longer period of time, wrap each orange in paper (to keep moisture out) and store in a box in the refrigerator. Blood oranges stored this way will keep for up to three weeks.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Lemons

How to choose: Select lemons that are small, firm and heavy for their size. Lighter weight lemons will yield less juice.

How to store: Held on the counter top at room temperature, washed lemons will last 7 to 10 days. Refrigerated lemons will last up to six weeks.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Grapefruit

How to choose: Look for heavy, thin-skinned fruits that are firm but slightly springy when pressed. Avoid those with thick, rough skins or overly soft spots.

How to store: Washed grapefruits will last for around one week if left out at room temperature. To keep grapefruits for up to six weeks, store them in the refrigerator.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Pomegranate

How to choose: Select plump, brightly colored pomegranates that are firm and heavy for their size. The skin of the fruit should be smooth and shiny. Avoid pomegranates with withered or leathery skin.

How to store: Whole pomegranates can be kept in a cool, dry place for up to a month. Refrigerated fruit will last up to two months. Once harvested from the fruit, the seeds can be kept refrigerated in a plastic bag for up to three days.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Clementines

How to choose: Select clementines that are bright and shiny and smell like citrus. The fruit should give to light pressure and should be a bright orange color.

How to store: Washed clementines will last around a week at room temperature, but can be kept in the refrigerator for up to six weeks.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Persimmons

How to choose: Persimmons should have a glossy, deep-reddish skin with no bruising. There are two kinds of persimmons: Round Fuyu persimmons are delicious when firm but give slightly to pressure; acorn-shaped Hachiya persimmons can be purchased when still firm, but should be left to ripen until completely soft before eating.

How to store: Keep fruit at room temperature until ripe. Once ripe, fruit can be stored in a plastic bag and refrigerated for up to two weeks.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Oranges

How to choose: For the best flavor, look for oranges that are firm and heavy for their size with a thin, smooth skin. Surprisingly, discolored spots are not a sign that an orange is not ripe.

How to store: Oranges taste best at room temperature, but if you need to store your oranges for a longer period of time, wrap each orange in paper (to keep moisture out) and store in a box in the refrigerator. Oranges stored this way will keep for up to three weeks.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Dates

How to choose: Look for fresh dates that are plump and have unblemished, smooth skin.

How to store: Fresh dates should be kept covered in the refrigerator for three to four weeks.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Winter Fruits: Tangerines

How to choose: Choose firm tangerines that are heavy for their size. Discolorations do not indicate a problem with ripeness.

How to store: Washed tangerines will last up to one week at room temperature. When refrigerated, they can last up to six weeks.

Image Credit: Getty Images

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