A Guide to Eating During Ramadan

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
12 PHOTOS
A Guide to Eating During Ramadan
See Gallery
A Guide to Eating During Ramadan

Read on to learn about some foods that are typically eaten during Ramadan.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Fruit, Dried Fruit and Nuts

Many Muslims eat dates, dried fruit and nuts during Ramadan.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Tabbouleh

Tabbouleh is a Middle Eastern salad made with bulgur wheat, fresh tomatoes, garlic and parsley. It could be served for the suhoor or iftar meal.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Fattoush

Fattoush is another Middle Eastern salad. This one consists of vegetables and pita bread.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Ful medammes

Ful medammes consists of fava beans cooked with garlic. The dish is then spread over bread.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Chorba

Chorba is a stew that can be enjoyed during the Ramadan fast. It consists of barley, chopped meat (like lamb or beef) and spices.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Chebakia

Chebakia (or Chabbakia) is a Moroccan dessert. It's a sweet fried dough that gets its flavor from orange flower water and a glaze of sesame seeds and honey.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Chapati

Chapati is an unleavened flatbread that can also be eaten during the holy month. The flatbread is rolled up with different meats and veggies.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Bamia

Bamia a Middle Eastern stew made with okra and meat.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Kolak

Kolak is an Indonesian dessert that consists of jack fruit or banana, coconut milk, palm sugar and pandanus leaf. Sometimes mung beans are added.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Lavash

Lavash is a thin and soft cracker-type flatbread also popular in Middle Eastern countries.

Image Credit: Getty Images

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Ramadan is a holy month for Muslims all over the world. It is a time of deep reflection, and during the 30 days, many Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset. While Muslims are not meant to eat during most of the day, there are still two meals served: the suhoor, a meal eaten before dawn and the iftar, a meal eaten after sunset. The suhoor is often heavier, since it is intended to give those fasting energy throughout the entire day.

Check out the slideshow above to learn the foods that are eaten during the holy month of Ramadan.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Best Bites by AOL and receive delicious recipes delivered to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners

Search Recipes