Cracked: The Story Behind the Cadbury Creme Egg

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
17 PHOTOS
Cracked: The Story Behind the Cadbury Creme Egg
See Gallery
Cracked: The Story Behind the Cadbury Creme Egg

Whether you eat them properly with a spoon or devour them in one mouthful, you can’t do wrong by these cream-filled chocolate egg treats. The Cadbury Crème Egg is top-selling treat in the U.K. and enjoys immense popularity worldwide during the months preceding Easter.

Read on to discover the history behind the Crème Egg, learn what makes them so beloved and find more ways to enjoy this sweet treat.

Image Credit: Cadbury

In 1824, John Cadbury opened his grocer’s shop on 93 Bull Street in Birmingham, England. His wares included cocoa and drinking chocolate, which stemmed from his Quaker beliefs that these drinks were healthier alternatives to alcohol.

Image Credit: Cadbury

Within 20 years, Cadbury expanded with factory-scale production of more than 27 varieties of chocolate with intriguing names like Churchman’s Chocolate, Iceland Moss and Homeopathic. After his retirement in 1861, his sons Richard and George took over the business.

Image Credit: Cadbury

The Cadbury brothers created their first chocolate Easter eggs in 1875 – a plain dark chocolate shell filled with sugar-coated chocolate drops. Cadbury cream-filled eggs appeared in 1923, and the Crème Egg we know and love debuted in 1971.

Image Credit: Cadbury

Operations moved to Birmingham, England's Bournville village in 1879, and Crème Eggs and other Cadbury confections continue to be produced there today. 1.5 million eggs are made every day.

Image Credit: Cadbury

The two halves of a Crème Egg milk chocolate shell are filled with creamy white fondant and topped with a bit of yellow fondant, and then the halves are sealed to each other. The fondant filling is a thick paste made of sugar and water.

Image Credit: Getty Images

If you think Crème Eggs taste different in the UK, you may be right – according to Colin Pitt, education manager at Cadbury World, Eggs in the UK taste sweeter and use a milk chocolate recipe containing full cream milk (instead of powdered milk in America).

Image Credit: Getty Images

TV advertising boosted Cadbury Crème Egg into a cult sensation. You may remember the popular “How Do You Eat Yours?” campaign and the clucking, egg-laying white rabbit that "nobunny" can forget.

Image Credit: Cadbury

Cadbury Crème Eggs line store shelves January through April. Despite its seasonal availability, sales exceed $300 million globally.

Image Credit: Cadbury

Other versions of Crème Egg available in the U.S. include caramel filling and chocolate fondant filling, and you can also find an addictive bite-sized version as well. Past flavors worldwide included peppermint, chocolate fudge and white chocolate.

Image Credit: Cadbury

There’s even Crème Egg ice cream, made with vanilla ice cream, fondant sauce and chocolate pieces, available in the U.K. To promote Cadbury ice cream, Cadbury sailed the world’s first “amphibious ice cream van” on the London Thames in June 2011.

Image Credit: Flickr / osde8info

Back in 2007, Cadbury addressed rumors about the shrinking size of their Crème Egg on their FAQ page with this cheeky response: “It hasn’t – you’ve just grown up!” The webpage was later amended to cite changing consumer preferences.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Actor and Crème Egg aficionado B.J. Novak shed light on this mystery when he went on Late Night with Conan O’Brien in 2007 with evidence: a fresh egg from that year and a noticeably smaller 2005 egg. You can still find the larger size sold in the UK.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Want to try new ways to eat your Creme Eggs? Try baking them in cupcakes, chopping them up in crème brulees, adding them to your coffee instead of sugar and cream or piling them on top meringue nests for a festive Easter treat.

Image Credit: Flickr / English Invader

You could also play with your food like 23-year-old New Zealander Joseph Herscher did when he devised a complex contraption to smash a Crème Egg in this YouTube video hit from 2008. The project took him six months to complete and boasts a pouring kettle, mechanized puppetry and plenty of flair.

Image Credit: Joseph Herscher

Plan a trip to Bournville village and visit Cadbury World, a family tourist attraction where you can learn about the manufacturing process, eat your own chocolate creations and shop for as many Crème Eggs as your heart desires at The World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop.

Image Credit: Cadbury

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Whether you eat them properly with a spoon or devour them in one mouthful, you can't do wrong by these cream-filled chocolate egg treats. The Cadbury Crème Egg is a top-selling treat in the U.K. and enjoys immense popularity worldwide during the months preceding Easter.

The Cadbury chocolate business grew from its small beginnings as a Birmingham, England storefront in the early 1800s into today's second-largest confectionery company in the world. Founder John Cadbury passed on the business to his sons Richard and George in 1861, and the brothers expanded production to include Easter chocolate eggs in 1875. The eggs started plain with smooth chocolate shells and sugar-coated treats nestled inside, but later became elaborate with marzipan flowers and piped chocolate accents. A version of the cream-filled egg came out in 1923, but the Crème Egg officially debuted in 1971.

It wasn't until four years later that the Crème Egg took off in popularity due to successful television advertising. Memorable campaigns included the slogans "Don't get caught with egg on your face" and "How Do You Eat Yours," as well as the clucking, egg-laying Cadbury bunny in North America. As sponsors of the London Olympics in 2012, Cadbury launched advertisements featuring Crème Eggs competing in Olympic events. With playful and unorthodox advertising, the Crème Egg grew its enormous cult following.

In the United States, Crème Egg is available in original, caramel and chocolate filling flavors, but over the years and across the world Cadbury has introduced special flavors like peppermint and white chocolate, fun sizes like the Giant Crème Egg and new treats like Cadbury Crème Egg Ice Cream and Cadbury Crème Egg McFlurry at British McDonald's. Some of these variations have been discontinued, and the limited availability of those flavors combined with their seasonal appearance sparks a feeding frenzy for the gooey treat during the spring season.

Interestingly, the taste of classic Cadbury's Crème Eggs may also vary from country to country. According to Colin Pitt, education manager at Cadbury World, eggs in the UK taste sweeter and use a milk chocolate recipe containing full cream milk (versus powdered milk in America).

Check out our slideshow above to hunt down more fun facts about beloved Cadbury Crème Egg.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Best Bites by AOL and receive delicious recipes delivered to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

People are Reading

Search Recipes