Otto strengthens to hurricane again: NHC

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Nov 23 (Reuters) - Otto, the seventh hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic season, regained hurricane strength and is located about 180 miles (285 km) east-southeast of Bluefields, Nicaragua, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Wednesday.

Otto had weakened to a tropical storm after intensifying into a hurricane on Tuesday.

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Otto strengthens to hurricane

Hurricane Otto is pictured approximately 305 miles east-southeast of Bluefields, Nicaragua, about 235 miles east of Limon, Costa Rica, and moving toward the west at speeds of near 2 miles per hour in this November 22, 2016 satellite handout photo.

(NOAA/Handout via REUTERS)

Workers cut a tree that killed a boy when it fell during a storm in Panama City on November 22, 2016. Tropical Storm Otto, that is expected to become a full-on hurricane in the Caribbean, was lurching toward Central America on Tuesday, with its rainy fringe already causing three deaths in Panama and prompting coastal evacuations in Costa Rica. In Panama, three people died from a mudslide and a falling tree provoked by the first outer dump of Otto's heavy rains, the head of the National Civil Protection Service, Jose Donderis, told

(RODRIGO ARANGUA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the sea before the arrival of Hurricane Otto in Limon, Costa Rica, on November 23, 2016. A Caribbean storm verging on a hurricane spun towards the coasts of Costa Rica and Nicaragua on Wednesday, prompting evacuations and red alerts ahead of 'life-threatening' flash flooding.

(EZEQUIEL BECERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

A child evacuated from areas of risk sleeps at the Hostel of the Church Upper Room which offers shelter as weather system Otto was forecast to strengthen in the Caribbean as it churned toward Central America, in Guapiles, Costa Rica, some 100 km from Limon, on November 23, 2016. A Caribbean storm verging on a hurricane spun towards the coasts of Costa Rica and Nicaragua on Wednesday, prompting evacuations and red alerts ahead of 'life-threatening' flash flooding.

(EZEQUIEL BECERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

Workers cut a tree that killed a boy when it fell during a storm in Panama City on November 22, 2016. Tropical Storm Otto, that is expected to become a full-on hurricane in the Caribbean, was lurching toward Central America on Tuesday, with its rainy fringe already causing three deaths in Panama and prompting coastal evacuations in Costa Rica. In Panama, three people died from a mudslide and a falling tree provoked by the first outer dump of Otto's heavy rains, the head of the National Civil Protection Service, Jose Donderis, told AFP.

(RODRIGO ARANGUA/AFP/Getty Images)

People who was evacuated from their home arrive at the Bluefields Port before the arrival of hurricane Otto in Bluefields, Nicaragua November 23, 2016.

(REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas)

People are evacuated as hurricane Otto approaches in Barra de Colorado, Costa Rica, November 22, 2016, in this handout photo provided by the Ministry of Public Security.

(Ministry of Public Security/Handout via Reuters)

View of the damage caused by a mudslide which killed two people in the community of Arraijan, 25 km from Panama City, on November 22, 2016. Tropical Storm Otto, that is expected to become a full-on hurricane in the Caribbean, was lurching toward Central America on Tuesday, with its rainy fringe already causing three deaths in Panama and prompting coastal evacuations in Costa Rica. In Panama, three people died from a mudslide and a falling tree provoked by the first outer dump of Otto's heavy rains, the head of the National Civil Protection Service, Jose Donderis, told AFP.

(RODRIGO ARANGUA/AFP/Getty Images)

An indigenous girl who was evacuated from her home arrives at the Bluefields Port before the arrival of hurricane Otto in Bluefields, Nicaragua November 23, 2016.

(REUTERS/Oswaldo Rivas)

The airport of Guapiles, Costa Rica, some 100 km from Limon, remains shut on November 23, 2016 as weather system Otto was forecast to strengthen in the Caribbean as it churned toward Central America. A Caribbean storm verging on a hurricane spun towards the coasts of Costa Rica and Nicaragua on Wednesday, prompting evacuations and red alerts ahead of 'life-threatening' flash flooding.

(EZEQUIEL BECERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

View of the damage caused by a mudslide which killed two people in the community of Arraijan, 25 km from Panama City, on November 22, 2016. Tropical Storm Otto, that is expected to become a full-on hurricane in the Caribbean, was lurching toward Central America on Tuesday, with its rainy fringe already causing three deaths in Panama and prompting coastal evacuations in Costa Rica. In Panama, three people died from a mudslide and a falling tree provoked by the first outer dump of Otto's heavy rains, the head of the National Civil Protection Service, Jose Donderis, told AFP.

(RODRIGO ARANGUA/AFP/Getty Images)

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The system, packing maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour (110 km/hour), is moving toward the west near 8 mph (13 km/h), the NHC said.

Otto is forecast to reach the Pacific coast of southern Nicaragua or northern Costa Rica early Friday, the Miami-based weather forecasting agency said. (Reporting by Harshith Aranya in Bengaluru; Editing by Leslie Adler)

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