LA 2024 bid committee looks to Trump as a unifier

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Republican Donald Trump's stunning victory in the U.S. presidential election was applauded on Wednesday by the Los Angeles bid committee that hopes to land the 2024 Olympics.

While Trump has angered many people with his polarizing words during a lengthy and often tumultuous presidential campaign, LA 2024 praised the Republican for "his longstanding support of the Olympic movement in the United States."

In a statement, the LA bid committee said: "LA 2024 congratulates President-elect Donald J. Trump ... we strongly believe the Olympics and LA 2024 transcend politics and can help unify our diverse communities and our world.

"LA 2024 has achieved 88 percent public support in the latest poll and strong bipartisan government support at the local, state and federal level.

"We look forward to working closely with President-elect Trump and his Administration across the federal government to deliver a 'New Games for a new Era' that will benefit and inspire the entire Olympic movement in 2024."

A wealthy real estate developer and former reality TV host, Trump defeated heavily favored rival Hillary Clinton in Tuesday's presidential election, ending eight years of Democratic rule and sending the U.S. on a new, uncertain path.

25 PHOTOS
Donald Trump becomes president-elect of the United States
See Gallery
Donald Trump becomes president-elect of the United States

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaks at his election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)

Donald Trump supporters cheer as U.S. presidential election results are announced during a Republican watch party in Phoenix, Arizona, November 8, 2016.

(REUTERS/Nancy Wiechec)

Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Republican presidential elect Donald Trump (L) arrives to speak during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 9, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

President-elect Donald Trump, shakes hands with Vice-President-elect Mike Pence during his election night rally, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York.

(AP Photo/John Locher)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and his campaign manager Kellyanne Conway greet supporters during his election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar/TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump cheer as they watch election returns during an election night rally, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in New York.

(AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Eric Trump and Donald Trump Jr. look on as Republican presidential elect Donald Trump speaks during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 9, 2016.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

US President-elect Donald Trump arrives at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 8, 2016. Trump stunned America and the world Wednesday, riding a wave of populist resentment to defeat Hillary Clinton in the race to become the 45th president of the United States.

(SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump greets supporters at his election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)

Vice president-elect Mike Pence speaks to supporters at Republican president-elect Donald Trump's election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Republican president-elect Donald Trump walks on stage with his son Barron Trump, wife Melania Trump and Ivanka Trump during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A supporter celebrates as returns come in for Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump during an election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 8, 2016.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar)

Chairman of the Republican National Committee (RNC) Reince Priebus hugs Republican presidential elect Donald Trump during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 9, 2016.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani arrives on stage with his wife Judith Nathan as U.S. President-elect Donald Trump addressed supporters at his election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Brendan McDermid)

US President-elect Donald Trump greets son Eric after speaking at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 8, 2016. Trump stunned America and the world Wednesday, riding a wave of populist resentment to defeat Hillary Clinton in the race to become the 45th president of the United States.

(SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Vice president-elect Mike Pence walks on stage with his wife Karen Pence at Republican president-elect Donald Trump election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Americans went to the polls yesterday to choose between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton as they go to the polls to vote for the next president of the United States.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

US President-elect Donald Trump arrives with his son Baron and wife Melania at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 8, 2016. Trump stunned America and the world Wednesday, riding a wave of populist resentment to defeat Hillary Clinton in the race to become the 45th president of the United States.

(SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, speaks an election night party at the Hilton Midtown hotel in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States in a repudiation of the political establishment that jolted financial markets and likely will reorder the nation's priorities and fundamentally alter America's relationship with the world.

(Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Melania Trump and Ivanka Trump look on as Republican presidential elect Donald Trump speaks during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 9, 2016.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump arrives to speak during an election night party at the Hilton Midtown hotel in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Trump racked up victory after victory in key states Tuesday to put himself in position to threaten Hillary Clinton for the White House, with the results in three Rust-Belt states likely to determine the next U.S. president.

(Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President-elect Donald Trump gives his acceptance speech during his election night rally, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York.

(AP Photo/John Locher)

Attendees cheer during an election night party for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Hilton Midtown hotel in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States in a repudiation of the political establishment that jolted financial markets and likely will reorder the nation's priorities and fundamentally alter America's relationship with the world.

(Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

On the campaign trail, Trump had made even his party's establishment uneasy with his abrasive tone and policy positions, including his promise to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexican border, deport 11 million illegal immigrants and temporarily bar Muslims from entering the country.

Earlier this year, however, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said the Olympics transcended politics and it would not matter whether Trump or Clinton ended up winning the presidential election.

"When the dust settles on these presidential campaigns and we have a new president, he or she will squarely be behind Los Angeles' bid to bring these Games back to the U.S." Garcetti said at the United States Olympic Committee media summit.

"This is something that breaks down walls and something that brings us together."

Los Angeles is up against European glamor cities Paris and Budapest in the race to host the 2024 Summer Games.

37 PHOTOS
Where are they now? The stars of Sydney 2000, Michael Phelps' first Olympics
See Gallery
Where are they now? The stars of Sydney 2000, Michael Phelps' first Olympics

Michael Phelps was 15 years old in the 2000 Olympics. He finished fifth in the 200-meter butterfly, his only event of the games.

Now 31, Phelps is the most decorated Olympian in history and is expected to medal again in Rio.

Australian swimmer Ian Thorpe won five medals, three of them gold, in 2000 as a 17-year-old.

Today, the "Thorpedo" does occasional media commentary, owns an aquatic center in Australia, and recently launched a line of pool cleaners called Thorpedo.

Nicknamed "Eric the Eel," Eric Moussambani, a swimmer from Equatorial Guinea, became a fan-favorite for his inspirational story, though he finished the 100-meter freestyle with the worst time in Olympic history.

Moussambani will attend the Rio Olympics as the coach of the Equatorial Guinea swim team.

Misty Hyman became the hero of US Swimming when she pulled off a major upset over Australia's Susie O'Neill to win gold in the 200-meter butterfly.

Hyman didn't qualify for the 2004 Olympics and retired from swimming. Today, she's an assistant coach for Arizona State University's swim team.

Dara Torres was another US swimming star, winning five medals, two gold in relays, after taking a seven-year break from swimming from 1992 to 1999.

Torres won 12 medals in her Olympic career. She is now an author and CBS Sports Network panelist.

Russian gymnast Alexei Nemov won the most medals in the entire games, pulling in two individual golds.

It's unclear what Nemov currently does, though he made headlines in 2016 for getting in an altercation with a political activist.

Michael Johnson concluded his legendary career with a gold medal in the 400 meters.

Widely considered the greatest 400-meter runner in history, Johnson now works with BBC and owns a training company called Michael Johnson Performance. He will be with BBC at Rio 2016.

Maurice Greene also starred for US track, winning a gold in the 100 meters and the 4x100-meter relay.

Greene retired as one of the best male sprinters, and has since appeared on "Dancing With the Stars" and volunteered as a track coach at UCLA.

Marion Jones dominated women's track for the US, winning five medals, three of them gold.

Jones was later stripped of those medals after admitting to taking performance-enhancing drugs. She has since written a book and become a public speaker.

Ato Boldon shined for the Trinidad and Tobago track team, pulling in a silver and bronze medal.

Today, Boldon is a track and field analyst for NBC Sports and ESPN.

Sprinter Cathy Freeman was a star for Australia in 2000. An Indigenous Australian, she won gold in the 400 meters and carried the torch in a spectacular opening ceremony.

Today, Freeman runs her own foundation focusing on the education of indigenous children and is an IOC Sport and Active Society Commission Member

Vince Carter was one of the stars of the US basketball team after pulling off "le dunk de la mort" — his wild dunk over 7-foot French center Frederic Weis.

Now, Carter is 39 years old and still playing in the NBA.

Meanwhile, Sheryl Swoopes averaged over 13 points per game to lead the US women to a gold medal.

Swoopes was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2016 and was coaching the Loyola Chicago women's basketball team but was fired in 2016.

American wrestler Rulon Gardner became a legend when he pulled off a massive upset over Russian wrestler Alexander Karelin, who had not lost in 15 years.

Gardner has had a bit of a wild journey since 2000. He's attempted several comebacks, struggled with weight, appeared on "The Biggest Loser," and worked briefly as an analyst. He attempted to make the trials for Rio 2016 but was unsuccessful.

Lisa Fernandez set an Olympics softball strikeouts record for the US.

Today, Fernandez is an assistant coach for UCLA's softball team.

In 2000, Venus, 20, and Serena Williams, 18, won gold in women's doubles. Venus also won gold in women's singles.

Now, Serena is 34, Venus is 36, they're ranked first and sixth in the world, respectively, and own 114 combined singles titles.

In 2000, Lance Armstrong was 28 years old and fresh off his first Tour de France victory. He won bronze in the individual time trial.

Armstrong, of course, after his immense doping scandal, was stripped of his Olympic medal. Now, Armstrong has various projects, including a podcast.

Leontien Van Moorsel took home three gold medals in cycling for the Netherlands in her return from a battle with anorexia.

Van Moorsel is the most decorated women's cyclist of all-time and now owns Leontien Total Sports, a sportswear shop, and the Leontien Foundation, which raises money and awareness for eating disorders.

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Read Full Story

From Our Partners