LSU has reportedly fired Les Miles

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LSU has fired football coach Les Miles, multiple sources confirmed to The Advocate on Sunday.

Miles coached the Tigers for 12 years, winning the BCS championship in 2007. His team entered the season ranked fifth in the country, but after losing to Auburn on Saturday to fall to 2-2 on the season, the Tigers are no longer ranked in the top 25.

Along with Miles, offensive coordinator Cam Cameron has also reportedly been fired.

Check out the highest-paid college football coaches of 2016:

The highest-paid college football coaches of 2016
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The highest-paid college football coaches of 2016
11. Les Miles, LSU – $4.39 million

Les Miles has been the head coach at LSU since 2005 when he was hired to replace Nick Saban, who left Baton Rouge to take a stab at coaching in the National Football League with the Miami Dolphins. LSU hired Miles away from Oklahoma State, and “The Mad Hatter” has proven to be one of the premier coaches during his 11 seasons leading the “Bayou Bengals.”

Miles has posted an overall record of 112-32 (a .778 winning percentage); led LSU to two SEC titles and one national title; and has had countless former players go on to play in the NFL. The 62-year-old coach is under contract with LSU through the 2019 season, but after two straight seasons of failing to reach 10 wins, Miles may be coaching to save his job in 2016.

(Stacy Revere via Getty Images)

10. James Franklin, Penn State – $4.4 million

Penn State hired James Franklin away from Vanderbilt in 2014 after their former head coach, Bill O’Brien, left the college ranks behind to become the head coach of the Houston Texans. Judging by the hefty contract he received, the Penn State administration thinks extremely highly of Franklin’s abilities as a football coach.

In his two seasons of guiding the Nittany Lions, Franklin has posted a 14-12 overall record with two bowl game appearances. More importantly though, he has helped revive the program and started convincing big-time recruits that the future is bright in State College, Penn.

(Joe Robbins via Getty Images)

9. Dabo Swinney, Clemson – $4.55 million

Dabo Swinney is hands down one of the most polarizing personalities in all of college football. And it just so happens that he is an excellent coach, too. Since being promoted to the full-time head coach at Clemson in 2009, Swinney has led the Tigers to an overall record of 71-24, two ACC titles, and an appearance in the 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship Game. As a result, Clemson rewarded Swinney with a contract extension this spring that makes him one of the highest-paid college football coaches in the country.

(Tyler Smith via Getty Images)

8. Hugh Freeze, Ole Miss – $4.7 million

When Hugh Freeze took over at Ole Miss in 2012, he inherited a program that was coming off of a disastrous 2-10 season in 2011. He was able to quickly turn things around in Oxford, Miss., going 7-6 in his first year on the job.

In the three seasons after that, he’s led the Rebels to a 27-12 record. He has guided the program to bowl games in every year he has held the job, and he was rewarded with a contract extension this January. Looking forward, 2016 has a chance to be a special season (barring any NCAA sanctions following Laramy Tunsil’s draft day meltdown) for the Rebels with a Heisman Trophy candidate under center in Chad Kelly.

(Wesley Hitt via Getty Images)

7. Kevin Sumlin, Texas A&M – $5 million

Texas A&M hired Kevin Sumlin away from the University of Houston in 2012, and the 51-year-old coach instantly turned the Aggies into one of the most exciting teams in the country to watch. Under Sumlin, Texas A&M has emerged as an offensive juggernaut and a place where NFL scouts go to find high-quality talent. With that being said, Sumlin will undoubtedly start to feel the heat if the Aggies do not improve in the win/loss column in 2016.

(Scott Halleran via Getty Images)

6. Charlie Strong, Texas – $5,100,270

Texas hired Charlie Strong away from Louisville to take over for longtime head coach Mack Brown back in 2014. At the time of his hiring, Strong was one of the fastest rising coaches in the business, but his time in Austin hasn’t exactly gone as planned.

To be fair, Strong did go in and clean house during his first two seasons on the job. Nevertheless, his two-year record at Texas is 11-14, which means that he is firmly entrenched in the hot seat entering the 2016 season.

(Cooper Neill via Getty Images)

5. Jimbo Fisher, Florida State – $5.15 million

Taking over for a legend is never an easy task, but Jimbo Fisher has made it look extremely easy. Since taking over for Bobby Bowden in 2010, Fisher has led the Seminoles to a 68-14 overall record, three ACC titles, one national title, and one appearance in the College Football Playoff.

Knowing this, it should come as no surprise that the 50-year-old coach is among the highest-paid coaches in the country. His recently signed contract extension runs through the 2022 season and could be worth as much as $44 million in total.

(Joe Robbins via Getty Images)

4. Bob Stoops, Oklahoma – $5.4 million

Bob Stoops is currently tied with Kirk Ferentz of Iowa as the longest tenured Football Bowl Subdivision head coaches in the country. In his 17 seasons on the job at Oklahoma, Stoops has put together a Hall of Fame-caliber career.

With a career record of 179-46, Stoops has led the Sooners to nine Big 12 championships and one national championship, won multiple Coach of the Year awards, coached two Heisman Trophy winners, and led his teams to bowl games in every season he has held the position. With a resume like that, it’s no wonder that Stoops is one of the most handsomely paid coaches in college football history.

(Kevin C. Cox via Getty Images)

3. Urban Meyer, Ohio State – $5.86 million

Very few coaches have ever achieved the kind of success Urban Meyer has enjoyed over the course of his career. Every program he has been in charge of has reached new heights under his guidance, and he has proven to be one of the best in the business when it comes to developing NFL-caliber talent.

Since taking over at The Ohio State University in 2012, all Meyer has done is lead the Buckeyes to a 50-4 overall record, one national title, one Big Ten title, and three New Year’s Day bowl games. He is one of the highest-paid coaches in college football, and he has been worth every penny to Ohio State.

(Andrew Weber via Getty Images)

2. Jim Harbaugh, Michigan – $7.004 million

Simply put, Jim Harbaugh is unlike any other coach in college football. He has a huge personality, does things his own way, and demands excellence out of his players and his coaching staff. More notably, though, he is a flat-out winner. In just one year, Harbaugh has taken Michigan from being a mediocre team in the Big Ten to a legitimate national title contender and a force to be reckoned with on the recruiting trail.

For Michigan, landing Harbuagh wasn’t cheap — despite the fact that he played quarterback in Ann Arbor from 1983–86. But when it comes down to it, he has already proven to be well worth his enormous contract.

(Christian Petersen via Getty Images)

1. Nick Saban, Alabama – $7.09 million

The bottom line here is that Nick Saban is the gold standard in today’s college football coaching landscape. Back in 2007, he took over a dormant Alabama program and has since turned the Crimson Tide into a bona fide college football dynasty.

Saban’s program is currently on one of the greatest runs in college football history, posting a 105-18 overall record with four national titles, four SEC titles, and two Heisman Trophy winners in nine years. Needless to say, Alabama has seen and incredible return on their massive investment in Saban.

(Christian Petersen via Getty Images)


Miles was nearly fired at the end of the 2015 season, only to have LSU President F. King Alexander nix the plan at the last minute.

LSU has not finished a season ranked in the top 10 since losing the BCS championship game following the 2011 season.

Defensive line coach Ed Orgeron will serve as the interim head coach for the remainder of the season, according to The Advocate. Orgeron previously served as the interim head coach at USC when Lane Kiffin was fired in the middle of the 2013 season.

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RELATED: Ranking the best college football programs of all time:

Ranking the best college football programs of all time
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Ranking the best college football programs of all time

Total wins: 878
National championships: 16*
Conference titles: 25
Heisman Trophy winners: 3

In our eyes, the University of Alabama is home to the greatest program in college football history. The Tide have had massively successful runs (including their ongoing dynasty) under arguably the two greatest coaches in college football history in Bear Bryant (1958–82) and Nick Saban (2007 to the present). They have won a record 16 national titles (some people will argue that it’s only 14, though), 25 conference titles, 878 total games, and had three Heisman Trophy winners. And with the way things are shaping up, there is a good chance that the Tide will win another national championship in 2016.

Statistics courtesy of Sports-Reference.

Total wins: 815
National championships: 11
Conference titles: n/a
Heisman Trophy winners: 7

The Notre Dame Fighting Irish have never been affiliated with a specific conference, but that hasn’t stopped them from becoming one of the most storied college football programs of all time. Everything from their helmets, to their stadium, to their never-ending list of All-Americans and College Football Hall of Famers, to “Touchdown Jesus” looking over their home field (see above photo) makes Notre Dame iconic. The Fighting Irish have won 815 total games, 11 national championships, and have had seven Heisman Trophy winners.

Total wins: 729
National championships: 11
Conference titles: 37
Heisman Trophy winners: 7*

The USC Trojans have been a college football powerhouse since the early ’20s. They have had three different head coaches win 100 or more games, and a fourth coach, Pete Carroll, won 97 games. During the Trojans’ run to 729 wins, 11 national titles, and 37 conference titles, they became known as “Tailback U” and served as the main football attraction in the major media market of Los Angeles from 1995–2016 while the city was without a team in the National Football League. USC is currently fighting to get back into national title contention, and with the type of talent they bring in on a yearly basis, it shouldn’t be long before we see the Trojans competing in the College Football Playoff.

*Includes the Heisman Trophy won by Reggie Bush which has since been vacated.

Total wins: 899
National championships: 11
Conference titles: 42
Heisman Trophy winners: 3

The University of Michigan is home to one of the proudest and most tradition-rich college football programs in the country. The Wolverines have won more games than any other team in the Football Bowl Subdivision; they almost always lead the nation in home game attendance figures; they have won a whopping 11 national titles and 42 conference titles; and they have 39 former coaches and players who have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Michigan is currently in the midst of a program revival under new head coach Jim Harbaugh, who has built the Wolverines into legitimate national title contenders in just his second year on the job.

Total wins: 767
National championships: 8
Conference titles: 36
Heisman Trophy winners: 7

Ohio State University is home to one of the greatest college football programs of all time. The Buckeyes have won eight national titles, 36 conference titles (34 came in the Big Ten), and 767 total games. Their seven Heisman Trophy winners ties them for the most by a single program in college football history. Few other schools can boast attendance figures that rival Ohio State’s, and Ohio Stadium (nicknamed “The Horseshoe”) is one of the most recognizable sporting venues in the country.

With head coach Urban Meyer at the helm, the Buckeyes are in the midst of yet another dominant run and should be among the top contenders to win the College Football Playoff National Championship Game in 2016.

Total wins: 808
National championships: 7
Conference titles: 44
Heisman Trophy winners: 5

The Oklahoma Sooners are one of a handful of college football programs that have withstood the test of time. They are the only program in major college football history to have four coaches each win 100 or more games during their time in Norman, Okla.. Over the last decade they have won 10 or more games in a season eight times (they have also accomplished the feat 25 times in the last 50 years); they have had five Heisman Trophy winners; and they have won 808 total games, 44 conference titles, and seven national titles. With a loaded squad that includes a serious Heisman contender in quarterback Baker Mayfield, the Sooners will likely contend for their program’s eighth national championship in 2016.

Total wins: 845
National championships: 5
Conference titles: 43
Heisman Trophy winners: 3

Ever since Bob Devaney took over as their head coach in 1962, the University of Nebraska football team has been a force to be reckoned with. Devaney’s eventual replacement, Tom Osborne, was one of the greatest football coaches (at any level) in the history of the sport and the ’99 College Football Hall of Fame inductee led the Huskers program to new heights. From 1973–97, Nebraska had 15 10-win seasons, won three national titles, and had two Heisman Trophy winners. Perhaps the greatest indication of how great this program truly is, is the fact that anything less than a 10-win season typically results in their head coaches landing in the hot seat.

Total wins: 835
National championships: 4
Conference titles: 30
Heisman Trophy winners: 2

No matter the level, football is king in Texas. Knowing this, it should come as no surprise that the Texas Longhorns are among the greatest college football programs of all time. Their dominance has been somewhat forgotten as of late given their recent struggles, but when it comes down to it, 835 wins, 53 bowl game appearances, 30 conference titles, and four national titles is nothing to scoff at.

Total wins: 555
National championships: 5
Conference titles: 9
Heisman Trophy winners: 2

In the early ’80s, the Miami Hurricanes went from being one of the biggest laughingstocks in all of college football to being one of the best programs in the history of the sport. In the process of becoming “The U,” Miami went on two dynasty-esque runs. The first was from 1983–1994 under head coaches Howard Schnellenberger, and the second came during the 2000–05 seasons with Butch Jones and Larry Coker at the helm. On top of it all, there may not be a better school in the country when it comes to producing NFL talent.

Total wins: 486*
National championships: 3
Conference titles: 15
Heisman Trophy winners: 3

The fact that the Florida State football program has had just two head coaches since 1974 should tell you everything you need to know about how successful the Seminoles have been throughout the years. Former FSU head coach Bobby Bowden, who coached the Noles from 1976–2009, can be credited for the program’s rise into national prominence. Current head coach Jimbo Fisher has carried on the tradition of excellence in Tallahassee. On top of churning out countless All-Americans, Florida State has also become a haven for future NFL draft picks.

Total wins: 674
National championships: 3
Conference titles: 9
Heisman Trophy winners: 3

Over the last 25 years, the Florida Gators have been one of the most dominant college football programs in the country. During that stretch of time, they have posted 14 double-digit win seasons, won eight SEC titles and three national titles, and had two Heisman Trophy winners (quarterbacks Danny Wuerffel and Tim Tebow).

The University of Florida football program has always been strong, but they truly became a national power in the mid-’90s when Steve Spurrier took over as the team’s head coach. They also later enjoyed an immense run of success under Urban Meyer, and despite a rough four-year run from 2011–14 under former head coach Will Muschamp, the future again looks bright in Gainesville, Fla. with new head coach Jim McElwain leading the way.


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