Ryan Clark defends Colin Kaepernick and wears his jersey after the killing of another unarmed black man

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The whole point of Colin Kaepernick kneeling during the Star-Spangled Banner isn't because he doesn't love The Troops or because he hates America — it's because he reached his breaking point with police brutality, specifically cops murdering unarmed black men.

On Monday, Tulsa police released video of officer Betty Shelby killing Terence Crutcher, an unarmed black man whose vehicle had broken down. After Crutcher was shot, officers on the scene offered no assistance for several minutes.

This led to ESPN's Ryan Clark offering a refresher course on why Kaepernick has been doing what he's been doing.

Clark makes the point that the Chelsea bomber that was captured in New Jersey on Monday engaged in a firefight with cops but managed to survive, yet Crutcher did not.

This led to a calm and rational exchange of ideas on Twitter, a great place for people of various backgrounds to engage and learn and... just kidding.

On the Twitter troll bingo card, "you just want attention" should be the center square. Yes, a black man being shot and left to die in the streets is the moment Clark has been waiting for so he can interact with an anonymous dude with 11 followers or a guy with a confederate flag as his avatar. It's a real dream come true for Clark.

It all culminated with Clark making an appearance on the ESPN radio show Mike & Mike this morning in the Kaepernick jersey.

Hopefully this doesn't hurt the feelings of any cops that may choose to withdraw their services in the Bristol, Conn., area, because the last thing anyone wants in all this is sad cops.

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See which NFL players are joining Kaepernick's protest:

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Colin Kaepernick and more pro athletes protesting during the national anthem
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Colin Kaepernick and more pro athletes protesting during the national anthem
SANTA CLARA, CA - SEPTEMBER 12: Colin Kaepernick #7 of the San Francisco 49ers kneels in protest during the national anthem prior to playing the Los Angeles Rams in their NFL game at Levi's Stadium on September 12, 2016 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Robert Reiners/Getty Images)
FOXBORO, MA - SEPTEMBER 22: Duane Brown #76 of the Houston Texans raises his fist during the national anthem before the game against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on September 22, 2016 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. (Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)
FOXBORO, MA - SEPTEMBER 18: Kenny Stills #10 of the Miami Dolphins (C) kneels during the national anthem before the game against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on September 18, 2016 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Philadelphia Eagles players Steven Means (51), Malcolm Jenkins (27) and Ron Brooks (33) raise their fists in the air during the national anthem for a game against the Chicago Bears on Monday, Sept. 19, 2016 at Soldier Field in Chicago, Ill. (Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
USA's Megan Rapinoe, right, kneels next to teammates Samanth Mewis (20) Christen Press (12), Ali Krieger (11), Crystal Dunn (16) and Ashlyn Harris (22) as the US national anthem is played before an exhibition soccer match against Netherlands Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016 file photo, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, middle, kneels during the national anthem before the team's NFL preseason football game against the San Diego Chargers, in San Diego. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell disagrees with Kaepernick's choice to kneel during the national anthem, but recognizes the quarterback's right to protest. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)
Sep 8, 2016; Denver, CO, USA; Denver Broncos inside linebacker Brandon Marshall (54) kneels during the national anthem next to defensive end Jared Crick (93) and defensive tackle Billy Winn (97) and defensive tackle Adam Gotsis (99) before the game against the Carolina Panthers at Sports Authority Field at Mile High. Mandatory Credit: Ron Chenoy-USA TODAY Sports
From left, Miami Dolphins' Jelani Jenkins, Arian Foster, Michael Thomas, and Kenny Stills, kneel during the singing of the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks, Sunday, Sept. 11, 2016, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)
SANTA CLARA, CA - SEPTEMBER 12: Kenny Britt #18 and Robert Quinn #94 of the Los Angeles Rams raise their fists in protest prior to playing the San Francisco 49ers in their NFL game at Levi's Stadium on September 12, 2016 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
Phoenix Mercury's Kelsey Bone, right, and Mistie Bass, second from right, kneel during the playing of the national anthem before the start of a first round WNBA playoff basketball game against the Indiana Fever, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
#Chiefs Marcus Peters and team during playing of National Anthem before game vs #Chargers https://t.co/86JPRzZJL6
@EdgeofSports https://t.co/ppxkQtLKqF
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