Roger Goodell just pumped the brakes on the Raiders' potential move to Las Vegas

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Roger Goodell is not yet sold on the Raiders' potential move from Oakland to Las Vegas.

Speaking from the Vikings' new stadium in Minneapolis on Sunday night, the NFL commissioner said a lot has to happen before any possible relocation. Last week, the South Nevada Tourism Infrastructure Committee voted unanimously to recommend a financing proposal for a $1.9 billion, 65,000-seat stadium in downtown Las Vegas for the Raiders.

"There's still a lot that has to happen before we would get to that stage," Goodell said of the Raiders move, according to Pro Football Talk. "Recognizing that they came out of committee with a bill, but there's still a lot of work to be done to improve that recommendation."

Goodell added that organizations struggling to build new stadiums in their current location should look to the Vikings, who managed to construct a new stadium in Minneapolis to replace the Metrodome in large part because of the $500 million in public funding that the city provided.

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"Well, you never want to see a community lose their franchise once, much less twice," Goodell said. "The Minnesota community did that in a great way. I think we can do it in Oakland. I think there's a solution there, but it takes the community to help identify it."

Considering that St. Louis has lost two football franchises (the Rams and the Cardinals), there's plenty of irony to be found in Goodell's quote. Still, it's noteworthy that Goodell is publicly advocating for the Raiders to stay in Oakland, especially as momentum appears to be moving in the direction of Las Vegas.

Raiders' owner Mark Davis would need 23 other owners to approve the move. In Goodell's mind, right now, that's still a long shot.

TOURING EVERY NFL STADIUM AROUND THE COUNTRY:

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Touring all 31 NFL stadiums (Architectural Digest)
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Touring all 31 NFL stadiums (Architectural Digest)

In Charlotte, North Carolina, the Carolina Panthers play before 75,400 fans at Bank of America Stadium. Completed in 1996, the venue was designed by Populous.

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Gillette Stadium has been the home of the New England Patriots since 2002. Situated just outside Boston, in Foxborough, Massachusetts, the Populous-designed venue can seat 68,750 fans.

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Ford Field is where the Detroit Lions have played since 2002. Designed by the locally based firm Rossetti Architects, the hometown venue has a capacity of 65,000.

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The Dallas Cowboys play before 80,000 in the HKS-designed AT&T Stadium. Built in 2009, the venue is located in Arlington, Texas.

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When the Rams return to Los Angeles this year (after a ten-year run in St. Louis), they’ll take residence in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Completed in 1923 by architects John and Donald Parkinson, the venue is also home to USC’s college football team. The two will only have to share the stadium until 2019, when the Rams move into their soon-to-be-built City of Champions Stadium, designed by the Dallas-based firm HKS. Estimated at $2.6 billion, the new venue would be the world’s most expensive sports complex.

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In 1972, the Kansas City Chiefs’ new home was opened in Kansas City, Missouri. Designed by the locally based firm Kivett and Myers and renovated in 2007–10 by Populous, Arrowhead Stadium holds up to 76,400 fans.

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Since 2002, the Seattle Seahawks have played in the 69,000-capacity CenturyLink Field. The Seattle stadium was designed by Minnesota-based firm Ellerbe Becket.

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Located in Landover, Maryland, FedEx Field is home to the Washington Redskins. The 82,000-seat stadium was designed by the New York-based firm Populous in 1997.

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The Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans is the home field of the Saints. Built in 1975, the 73,200-capacity stadium was designed by the locally based firm Curtis and Davis Architects.

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Ralph Wilson Stadium is where the Buffalo Bills pack in 71,870 screaming fans. Located in Orchard Park, New York, the venue was designed by HNTB in 1973 and renovated by Populous in 2013.

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Back in 1995, Populous completed its design of Jacksonville, Florida’s EverBank Field, home to the Jaguars. The venue can accommodate 67,245 ardent supporters.

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Since 1992, the Atlanta Falcons have called the Georgia Dome their home. Built by the Philadelphia-based firm Heery International, the structure can seat 71,250 fans. Plans for the Falcons’ new home, the HOK-designed Mercedes-Benz Stadium, are in the works, with construction expected to be completed by 2017.

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The Baltimore Ravens play before 71,000 exuberant fans at M&T Bank Stadium in their home city. The structure was completed in 1998 by Populous.

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Some 70,560 spectators pack into Qualcomm Stadium to cheer on their beloved San Diego Chargers. Built in 1967, the venue was designed by the San Diego–based firm Frank L. Hope and Associates.

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Lincoln Financial Field has been the Philadelphia Eagles’ home field since 2003. Located in the team’s home city, the 69,600-capacity stadium was designed by the New York-based firm NBBJ.

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Designed by Populous in 1999, Nissan Stadium in Nashville, Tennessee, can pack in some 69,150 fans to cheer on the Tennessee Titans.

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The 68,400 faithful that pack Heinz Field each game day come to support the Pittsburgh Steelers. Built in 2001 by Populous, the venue is located in the team’s home city.

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In Green Bay, Wisconsin, some 81,435 fans can pack into Lambeau Field to cheer on their beloved Packers. The Green Bay–based firm Somerville built the iconic venue in 1957.

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Completed in 2014, Levi’s Stadium is the new home of the San Francisco 49ers. Located in Santa Clara, California, the 68,500-capacity venue was designed by HNTB.

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Sports Authority Field at Mile High is home to the Denver Broncos. Located in the team’s home city, the venue was completed in 2001 by the New York–based firm HNTB and can accommodate 76,125 spectators.

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The Cleveland Browns have played in FirstEnergy Stadium since 1999. Designed by Populous, their hometown stadium can seat 67,430 fans each game.

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Lucas Oil Stadium has been the home field of the Indianapolis Colts since 2008. Located in downtown Indianapolis, the HKS-designed venue was completed in 2008.

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The Houston Texans play before 71,500 fans at NRG Stadium in their home city. The venue was completed in 2002 by Populous.

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Raymond James Stadium has been home to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers since 1998. Some 65,890 fans can pack into the Tampa, Florida, venue, another Populous project.

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The recently completed U.S. Bank Stadium is the new home of the Minnesota Vikings. The HKS-designed structure is located in the heart of downtown Minneapolis and can seat 66,200 fans.

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Back in 2000, Paul Brown Stadium became the new home of the Cincinnati Bengals. Created by NBBJ, the venue can hold up to 65,515 spectators.

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Although it’s called New Miami Stadium, the Dolphins’ homefield was actually completed in 1987, by Populous. The stadium can currently hold 65,325 people.

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MetLife Stadium is the only NFL venue that is home to two teams. Both the New York Giants and the New York Jets play in the 82,500-seat East Rutherford, New Jersey, stadium, which was designed by the Missouri–based 360 Architecture and completed in 2010.

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The Arizona Cardinals have been playing at the University of Phoenix Stadium, in Glendale, since 2006. Created by New York–based Eisenman Architects, the structure has seating for 63,400 fans.

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Built in 1966, the Oakland Alameda Coliseum in California—home to the Oakland Raiders—is among the oldest operating NFL stadiums in the country. Designed by the Chicago-based firm SOM, the team’s hometown venue has a capacity for 56,055 fans.

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The iconic Soldier Field is home to the Chicago Bears. Situated along Lake Michigan, the venue was completed in 1924 by Holabird and Roche. In 2003 the stadium underwent a renovation by Wood + Zapata, which enhanced crowd capacity to 61,500 and made it the first-ever LEED-certified NFL stadium.

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