Rare, recently discovered comet visible for the first time this January

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A newly discovered comet will be close enough to Earth to be visible — but catch it while you can, because it won't return for thousands of years, Tech Times reported Tuesday.

The comet, named C/2016 U1 NEOWISE, was discovered in October by NASA's NEOWISE mission, which monitors outer space for potential threats to our planet. For those in the Northern Hemisphere, C/2016 U1 NEOWISE will be visible just before dawn in the southeastern sky during the first two weeks of 2017, according to NASA.

The comet is moving farther south each day until Jan. 14, at which point it will be closest to the sun. Then, it'll be "heading back out to the outer reaches of the solar system for an orbit lasting thousands of years," according to NASA.

Some avid sky watchers have already been sharing photos on Twitter with images tagged "C/2016 U1 NEOWISE."

It's close to us, but don't panic: Just because you can see it doesn't mean it's coming to destroy us — while the comet "will be visible to skywatchers at Earth, it is not considered a threat to our planet either," according to NASA.

RELATED: Astronauts return to Earth

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NASA's Soyuz spacecraft returns to earth
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NASA's Soyuz spacecraft returns to earth
A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule carrying International Space Station (ISS) crew members, Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, descends near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule carrying International Space Station (ISS) crew members, Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, descends outside the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule carrying International Space Station (ISS) crew members Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, lands outside the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule stands on the ground shortly after its landing with International Space Station (ISS) crew members Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, as a rescue helicopter lands nearby, outside the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
A Russian Soyuz MS space capsule stands on the ground shortly after its landing with International Space Station (ISS) crew members Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, as a rescue helicopter lands nearby, outside the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists stand around the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule after its landing southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan waves shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team helps International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. calls his relatives shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan calls his relatives shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
The International Space Station (ISS) crew members Kate Rubins of the U.S., Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia and Takuya Onishi of Japan, surrounded by ground personnel, rest shortly after landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team members carry International Space Station (ISS) crew member Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. shortly after landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. shortly after landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Specialists help International Space Station (ISS) crew member Anatoly Ivanishin of Russia shortly after landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Russian space agency rescue team members carry International Space Station (ISS) crew member Takuya Onishi of Japan shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
Rescue team members carry International Space Station (ISS) crew member Kate Rubins of the U.S. shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS space capsule near the town of Dzhezkazgan (Zhezkazgan), Kazakhstan, October 30, 2016. REUTERS/Dmitri Lovetsky/Pool
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So now's your chance to wake up before dawn and catch a glimpse of this comet before it's gone for good. But don't worry too much about missing this one — 2017 will have plenty more exciting celestial events to observe before the year is over.

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