Trump reportedly 'furious' Kellyanne Conway went rogue and publicly bashed Romney

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

President-elect Donald Trump is reportedly furious over comments his former campaign manager Kellyanne Conway has made about Mitt Romney, who is under consideration for the secretary of state post in his Cabinet.

Conway suggested Sunday that Trump supporters felt "betrayed" by the consideration of Romney for the post. Romney, the former governor of Massachusetts and 2012 Republican presidential nominee, had been one of the most vocal critics of Trump during the 2016 election.

Two high-level sources on Trump's transition team told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" that the president-elect was "furious" that Conway went rogue at Trump's expense "at the worst possible time." Aides are reportedly "baffled" by Conway's comments and concerned that "instead of driving Trump's message," Conway is "pushing her own agenda," according to the report, which was laid out on air by hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski.

One top aide described Conway's behavior as "dangerous."

See photos of Conway from the campaign trail:

18 PHOTOS
Donald Trump's Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway on the trail
See Gallery
Donald Trump's Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway on the trail
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway is pictured during a meeting with Trump's Hispanic Advisory Council at Trump Tower in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., August 20, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway (L) is pictured during a meeting with Trump's Hispanic Advisory Council at Trump Tower in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., August 20, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump stands near his campaign manager Kellyanne Conway (L) before being introduced for the Commander in Chief Forum in Manhattan, New York, U.S., September 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway (C) attends a campaign rally in Fort Myers, Florida, U.S. September 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Campaign manager Kellyanne Conway and Paul Manafort of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's staff speak during a round table discussion on security at Trump Tower in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., August 17, 2016. Picture taken August 17, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway (L) and Paul Manafort, staff of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, speak during a round table discussion on security at Trump Tower in the Manhattan borough of New York, U.S., August 17, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
UNITED STATES - JUNE 18: Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, talks with Kellyanne Conway at the Faith & Freedom Coalitions Road to Majority conference which featured speeches by conservative politicians at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, June 18, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 18: Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, greets Kellyanne Conway at the Faith & Freedom Coalitions Road to Majority conference which featured speeches by conservative politicians at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, June 18, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 18: Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., talks with Kellyanne Conway at the Faith & Freedom Coalitions Road to Majority conference which featured speeches by conservative politicians at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, June 18, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Matt Bai. National Politics Correspondent, Yahoo! News, Kellyanne Conway, Republican Strategist and Pollster, and moderator Chuck Todd appear on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday May 8, 2016. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
Kellyanne Conway, president and chief executive officer of Polling Co. Inc./Woman Trend, smiles during an interview on 'With All Due Respect' in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, July 5, 2016. Asked how Trump reassures conservatives about his positions on issues such as abortion without losing ground with voters in the center, Republican pollster Conway, one of Trump's new senior strategists, said he would work to shift the spotlight to Clinton. Photographer: Chris Goodney/Bloomberg via Getty Images
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) Kellyanne Conway, Republican Strategist & Pollster, left, and Robert Costa, National Political Reporter, The Washington Post, right, appear on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday May 29, 2016. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
GOOD MORNING AMERICA - Kellyanne Conway is a guest on 'Good Morning America,' 5/10/16, airing on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Lou Rocco/ABC via Getty Images) KELLYANNE CONWAY, GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS
ASTON, PA - SEPTEMBER 22: Campaign manager Kellyanne Conway (R) stands backstage as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at the Sun Center Studios September 22, 2016 in Aston, Pennsylvania. A national poll released yesterday shows Trump trailing Democratic rival Hillary Clinton by 6 points in a four-way matchup. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
GOOD MORNING AMERICA - Kellyanne Conway discusses the Trump Campaign on 'Good Morning America,' 9/7/16, airing on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Ida Mae Astute/ABC via Getty Images) GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS, KELLYANNE CONWAY
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, talks with his campaign manager Kellyanne Conway during a visit to Goody's Restaurant, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016, in Brook Park, Ohio. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Kellyanne Conway, new campaign manager for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, speaks to reporters in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus, the incoming chief of staff in Trump's administration, is also reportedly frustrated with Conway.

Conway responded to the MSNBC report by calling it "sexist" and saying she could have any job she wanted in a Trump administration.

Conway continued her public attacks on Romney over the weekend, telling CNN on Sunday that while she hoped Romney would be a gracious secretary of state if selected, his aggressive criticism of Trump during the primaries did not sit well with the president-elect's supporters.

"It's just breathtaking in scope and intensity the type of messages I have received from all over the country," Conway said. "The number of people who feel betrayed to think that Governor Romney would get the most prominent Cabinet post, after he went so far out of his way to hurt Donald Trump — there was the Never Trump movement, and then there was Mitt Romney."

She added: "If President-elect Trump chooses Mitt Romney as his secretary of state, or whomever he chooses, that will have the full support and backing of all of us. I respect the brilliance and judgment and sheer instincts of President-elect Trump to form his Cabinet as he wishes. But I felt compelled to come forward on behalf of the people who were weighing in."

Romney is reportedly Trump's top pick for secretary of state, but the infighting over Romney's potential appointment has reached a boiling point inside Trump's camp. Former Mayor Rudy Giuliani of New York is also under consideration, as is former CIA Director David Petraeus, according to a Bloomberg report Monday.

RELATED: See Trump's rumored administration picks:

15 PHOTOS
Rumored contenders for Trump's administration
See Gallery
Rumored contenders for Trump's administration

(Contenders) Treasury Secretary, pending Senate confirmation

Steven Mnuchin, former Goldman Sachs Group Inc executive and Trump's campaign finance chairman

Jeb Hensarling, US representative from Texas and chairman of the House Financial Services Committee

Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan Chase & Co chief executive officer

Tom Barrack, founder and chairman of Colony Capital Inc

(Contenders) Secretary of State, pending Senate confirmation

Mitt Romney, 2012 Republican presidential nominee and former Massachusetts governor

Rudy Giuliani, former mayor of New York City

Nikki Haley, governor of South Carolina

John Bolton, former US ambassador to the United Nations under President George W. Bush

Bob Corker, US senator from Tennessee and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee

Zalmay Khalilzad, former US ambassador to Iraq

(Contenders) Defense Secretary, pending Senate confirmation

Tom Cotton, US senator from Arkansas

Jon Kyl, former US senator from Arizona

Duncan Hunter, US representative from California and early Trump supporter, member of the House Armed Services Committee

Jim Talent, former US senator from Missouri who was on the Senate Armed Services Committee

Kelly Ayotte, outgoing US senator from New Hampshire and member of the Senate Armed Services Committee

Retired Marine Gen. James Mattis

(Contenders) Health and Human Services Secretary, pending Senate confirmation

Tom Price, US representative from Georgia who is an orthopedic surgeon

Rick Scott, Florida governor

Rich Bagger, former pharmaceutical executive and former top aide to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie

Bobby Jindal, former Louisiana governor

(Contenders) Homeland Security Secretary, pending Senate confirmation

Michael McCaul, US representative from Texas and chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee

David Clarke, Milwaukee county sheriff and vocal Trump supporter

Joe Arpaio, outgoing Maricopa County, Arizona, sheriff who campaigned for Trump

(Contenders) Environmental Protection Agency Administrator, pending Senate confirmation

Jeff Holmstead, energy lawyer, former EPA official during George W. Bush administration

Mike Catanzaro, energy lobbyist, former EPA official during George W. Bush administration

Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors

Leslie Rutledge, Arkansas attorney general

Carol Comer, commissioner of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management

(Contenders) Energy Secretary, pending Senate confirmation

Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, chief executive of Continental Resources Inc

Kevin Cramer, US Representative from North Dakota

Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors

Larry Nichols, co-founder of Devon Energy Corp

James Connaughton, chief executive of Nautilus Data Technologies and a former environmental adviser to President George W. Bush

(Contenders) Interior Secretary, pending Senate confirmation

Sarah Palin, former Alaska governor, 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee

Jan Brewer, former Arizona governor

Forrest Lucas, founder of oil products company Lucas Oil

Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, chief executive of Continental Resources Inc

(Contenders) Commerce Secretary, pending Senate confirmation

Wilbur Ross, billionaire investor, chairman of Invesco Ltd subsidiary WL Ross & Co

Linda McMahon, former World Wrestling Entertainment executive and two-time Senate candidate

(Contenders) Director of National Intelligence, pending Senate confirmation

Ronald Burgess, retired lieutenant general and former Defense Intelligence Agency chief

Robert Cardillo, director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Pete Hoekstra, former US representative from Michigan

(Contender) US Trade Representative, pending Senate confirmation

Dan DiMicco, former chief executive of steel producer Nucor Corp

(Contenders) Labor Secretary, pending Senate confirmation

Victoria Lipnic, US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission commissioner and former Labor Department official during the George W. Bush administration

Andrew Puzder, CEO of CKE Restaurants

FILE - This Oct. 12, 2016, file photo, Republican Sen. Mike Lee, speaks with reporters after squaring off in a debate with Democratic challenger Misty Snow at Brigham Young University, in Provo, Utah. In Utah's three other congressional districts, incumbent Republican Reps. Rob Bishop, Jason Chaffetz and Chris Stewart expected to successfully defend their seats from Democratic challengers, while Lee is expected to win his first re-election bid. Lee, is being challenged by Misty Snow, 31-year-old grocery store clerk running on a platform of progressive and millennial issues in hopes of becoming the first openly transgender woman elected in Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, Pool, File)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Watch the 'Morning Joe' report below:

NOW WATCH: Clinton and Trump's final ads perfectly explain how different they are

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Top Trump adviser continues public crusade against Mitt Romney as secretary of state

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners