That monster sinkhole in Japan is sinking again

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A monster sinkhole that was repaired in 48 hours in the Japanese city of Fukuoka is sinking again.

Local police closed part of the road near JR Hakata railway station because a section of it began sinking again. The road has since been re-opened.

An official of the Fukuoka city government said the road had sunk by up to 7 centimetres over an area of 30 square metres.

RELATED: See the massive sinkhole

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Huge Japanese sinkhole spans five lanes of traffic
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Huge Japanese sinkhole spans five lanes of traffic
A huge sinkhole is seen at an intersection near Hakata station in Fukuoka, Japan, November 8, 2016 in this photo taken by Kyodo. Mandatory credit Kyodo/via REUTERS 
A huge sinkhole is seen at an intersection near Hakata station in Fukuoka, Japan, November 8, 2016 in this photo taken by Kyodo. Mandatory credit Kyodo/via REUTERS
A huge sinkhole is seen at an intersection near Hakata station in Fukuoka, Japan, November 8, 2016 in this photo taken by Kyodo. Mandatory credit Kyodo/via REUTERS 
This combo shows a photo of a giant sinkhole (R), measuring around 30 metres (98 feet) wide and 15 metres deep, which appeared in a five-lane street in the middle of the Japanese city of Fukuoka on November 8, 2016 and another photo (L) of the same section of road after repairs were made on November 15. The Japanese city on November 15 reopened the busy street that collapsed into a giant sinkhole, with efforts of crews who worked round the clock for a week drawing raves on social media. / AFP / JIJI PRESS / JIJI PRESS / Japan OUT (Photo credit should read JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images)
This combo shows a photo of a giant sinkhole (L) measuring around 30 metres (98 feet) wide and 15 metres deep, which appeared in a five-lane street in the middle of the Japanese city of Fukuoka on November 8, 2016 and another photo (R) of the same section of road after repairs were made on November 15. The Japanese city on November 15 reopened the busy street that collapsed into a giant sinkhole, with efforts of crews who worked round the clock for a week drawing raves on social media. / AFP / JIJI PRESS / JIJI PRESS / Japan OUT (Photo credit should read JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images)
Personnel are seen by a giant sinkhole as they work to fill the hole that appeared in the middle of Fukuoka's bustling business district, swallowing part of a five-lane street, on November 9, 2016. Workers dumped huge amounts of wet cement and sand into the gaping hole, measuring around 30 metres (98 feet) wide and 15 metres deep, that had exposed support columns of nearby buildings at a traffic intersection. / AFP / JIJI PRESS / STR / Japan OUT (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Personnel are seen by a giant sinkhole as they work to fill the hole that appeared in the middle of Fukuoka's bustling business district, swallowing part of a five-lane street, on November 9, 2016. Workers dumped huge amounts of wet cement and sand into the gaping hole, measuring around 30 metres (98 feet) wide and 15 metres deep, that had exposed support columns of nearby buildings at a traffic intersection. / AFP / JIJI PRESS / STR / Japan OUT (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
A giant sinkhole is seen in a five-lane urban boulevard, exposing support columns of nearby buildings at a traffic intersection in Fukuoka, southwestern Japan, on November 8, 2016. A giant sinkhole, measuring around 20 metres (66 feet) by 15, appeared in the middle of a busy Japanese city on November 8, swallowing part of a five-lane street near the main railway station. / AFP / JIJI PRESS / JIJI PRESS / Japan OUT (Photo credit should read JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images)
This photo shows a giant sinkhole (C) in a five-lane urban boulevard, eroding soil and exposing underground steel columns supporting commercial buildings in Fukuoka, southwestern Japan, on November 8, 2016. No injuries were reported as the accident occurred in the early morning hours. / AFP / JIJI PRESS / STR / Japan OUT (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
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City officials said some movement had been expected as a special mix of soil and cement used to fill the original sinkhole may have compressed a layer of soil underneath.

Fukuoka mayor Soichiro Takashima posted an apology on his Facebook page for not warning residents about the possibility the ground could move again.

Engineers and workers in Fukuoka were praised for how quickly they repaired the massive sinkhole, which swallowed parts of the main street in the city.

The road was fixed in 48 hours but it reopened on Tuesday, Nov. 15, after local officials declared the stretch safe.

The sinkhole began just 300 meters from the JR Hakata railway station and grew to more than half the size of an Olympic pool (30m). It resulted in power, water and gas supplies being cut in parts of the city. No one was injured.

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