Colin Kaepernick booed in Miami for 'defending' Fidel Castro

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On top of Colin Kaepernick's lackluster performance against the home team Miami Dolphins on Sunday, the 49ers quarterback rubbed some people the wrong way with his off-field comments, the latest of which defended late Cuban leader Fidel Castro.

When Kaepernick took the field on Sunday, boos proved again that the NFL star is now one of the league's most polarizing figures.

Earlier this season, Kaepernick sported a t-shirt capturing the meeting between Castro and Malcolm X in 1960. A Miami Herald reporter whose parents emigrated from Cuba grilled Kaepernick last week for wearing the shirt.

The reporter accused Kaepernick of dodging questions about Castro when the quarterback spent most of his answers discussing Malcolm X.

Kaepernick responded by saying, "One thing that Fidel Castro did do is they have the highest literacy rate because they invest more in their education system than they do in their prison system, which we do not do here, even though we're fully capable of doing that."

The back-and-forth continued, but it was enough for the reporter to call Kaepernick an "unrepentant hypocrite" for defending Castro while espousing the American virtues of free speech during his recent protests of police brutality. Miami fans appeared to echo that sentiment during Sunday's win over San Francisco.

Of course, Kaepernick is no stranger to backlash this season.

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Colin Kaepernick and more pro athletes protesting during the national anthem
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Colin Kaepernick and more pro athletes protesting during the national anthem
SANTA CLARA, CA - SEPTEMBER 12: Colin Kaepernick #7 of the San Francisco 49ers kneels in protest during the national anthem prior to playing the Los Angeles Rams in their NFL game at Levi's Stadium on September 12, 2016 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Robert Reiners/Getty Images)
SANTA CLARA, CA - OCTOBER 02: (L-R) Rashard Robinson #33, Antoine Bethea #41, and Jaquiski Tartt #29 of the San Francisco 49ers raise their fists in protest during the national anthem prior to the game against the Dallas Cowboys at Levi's Stadium on October 2, 2016 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
CINCINNATI, OH - SEPTEMBER 25: Brandon Marshall #54 of the Denver Broncos takes a knee in protest during the National Anthem before the game against the Cincinnati Bengals at Paul Brown Stadium on September 25, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio.The Broncos defeated the Bengals 29-17. (Photo by John Grieshop/Getty Images)
FOXBORO, MA - SEPTEMBER 22: Duane Brown #76 of the Houston Texans raises his fist during the national anthem before the game against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on September 22, 2016 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. (Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)
FOXBORO, MA - SEPTEMBER 18: Kenny Stills #10 of the Miami Dolphins (C) kneels during the national anthem before the game against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on September 18, 2016 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Philadelphia Eagles players Steven Means (51), Malcolm Jenkins (27) and Ron Brooks (33) raise their fists in the air during the national anthem for a game against the Chicago Bears on Monday, Sept. 19, 2016 at Soldier Field in Chicago, Ill. (Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
USA's Megan Rapinoe, right, kneels next to teammates Samanth Mewis (20) Christen Press (12), Ali Krieger (11), Crystal Dunn (16) and Ashlyn Harris (22) as the US national anthem is played before an exhibition soccer match against Netherlands Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016 file photo, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, middle, kneels during the national anthem before the team's NFL preseason football game against the San Diego Chargers, in San Diego. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell disagrees with Kaepernick's choice to kneel during the national anthem, but recognizes the quarterback's right to protest. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)
Sep 8, 2016; Denver, CO, USA; Denver Broncos inside linebacker Brandon Marshall (54) kneels during the national anthem next to defensive end Jared Crick (93) and defensive tackle Billy Winn (97) and defensive tackle Adam Gotsis (99) before the game against the Carolina Panthers at Sports Authority Field at Mile High. Mandatory Credit: Ron Chenoy-USA TODAY Sports
From left, Miami Dolphins' Jelani Jenkins, Arian Foster, Michael Thomas, and Kenny Stills, kneel during the singing of the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks, Sunday, Sept. 11, 2016, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Stephen Brashear)
SANTA CLARA, CA - SEPTEMBER 12: Kenny Britt #18 and Robert Quinn #94 of the Los Angeles Rams raise their fists in protest prior to playing the San Francisco 49ers in their NFL game at Levi's Stadium on September 12, 2016 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
Phoenix Mercury's Kelsey Bone, right, and Mistie Bass, second from right, kneel during the playing of the national anthem before the start of a first round WNBA playoff basketball game against the Indiana Fever, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
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The quarterback has kneeled during the national anthem in protest of American racial inequalities. A number of athletes (including some Dolphins players) have followed his lead. He's also received death threats, taunts from fans and heated responses from Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen A. Smith.

Kapernick clarified his comments about Castro after Sunday's game.

"What I said was I agree with the investment in education," Kaepernick said, per USA Today. "I also agree with the investment in free universal health care, as well as the involvement in helping end apartheid in South Africa."

"Trying to push the false narrative that I was a supporter of the oppressive things [Castro] did is just not true," Kaepernick continued. "I said I support the investment in education."

Kaepernick beat the Dolphins back in 2012, the season he emerged as San Francisco's dominant young quarterback, rushed for 181 yards against Green Bay in the playoffs and led the 49ers to the Super Bowl.

That Kaepernick — and that San Francisco team — is gone. The 49ers are 1-10 this year and Kaepernick isn't putting up the numbers he used to.

These days, he's the NFL's lightning rod for a much different reason.

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