Justin Trudeau tries to woo back supporters by tempering comments on Castro

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A day after Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau broke hearts by praising Fidel Castro in the wake of the Cuban leader's death, everyone's favorite Canadian since Michael J. Fox stood by his comments while making some allowances for Castro's darker side.

Trudeau kicked off an uproar on Saturday morning when he released a statement that spoke of Castro's "tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people" and called Castro a "legendary revolutionary and orator" as well as "remarkable."

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Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau waves on stage in Montreal on October 20, 2015 after winning the general elections. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie wave on stage in Montreal on October 20, 2015 after winning the general elections. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau arrives on stage in Montreal on October 20, 2015 after winning the general elections. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie walk off stage in Montreal on October 20, 2015 after winning the general elections. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Justin Trudeau, Canada's prime minister-elect and leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, shares a moment with his wife Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau after being elected prime minister on election night Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015. Trudeau's Liberal Party swept into office with a surprise majority, ousting Prime Minister Stephen Harper and capping the biggest comeback election victory in Canadian history. Photographer: Kevin Van Paassen/Bloomerg
Supporters of Justin Trudeau, leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, not pictured, celebrate as results come in on election night in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. Trudeau's Liberal Party has swept into office with a comfortable majority, tapping into voter fatigue with Prime Minister Stephen Harper by pledging more spending to stimulate Canada's sluggish economy. Photographer: Kevin Van Paassen/Bloomerg
Supporters of Justin Trudeau, leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, not pictured, celebrate as results come in on election night in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. Trudeau's Liberal Party has swept into office with a comfortable majority, tapping into voter fatigue with Prime Minister Stephen Harper by pledging more spending to stimulate Canada's sluggish economy. Photographer: Kevin Van Paassen/Bloomerg
Supporters of Justin Trudeau, leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, not pictured, celebrate as results come in on election night in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. Trudeau's Liberal Party has swept into office with a comfortable majority, tapping into voter fatigue with Prime Minister Stephen Harper by pledging more spending to stimulate Canada's sluggish economy. Photographer: Kevin Van Paassen/Bloomerg
Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie wave on stage in Montreal on October 20, 2015 after winning the general elections. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Conservative Leader Stephen Harper, Canada's prime minister, gestures during a news conference where he conceded victory on election day in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party has swept into office with a surprise majority, ousting Prime Minister Stephen Harper and capping the biggest comeback election victory in Canadian history. Photographer: Ben Nelms/Bloomerg
Conservative Leader Stephen Harper, Canada's prime minister, attends a news conference where he conceded victory on election day in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party has swept into office with a surprise majority, ousting Prime Minister Stephen Harper and capping the biggest comeback election victory in Canadian history. Photographer: Ben Nelms/Bloomerg
Supporters of Conservative Leader Stephen Harper, Canada's prime minister, not pictured, watch the polls as broadcasters project a Liberal Party victory on election day in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party has swept into office with a comfortable majority, tapping into voter fatigue with Harper by pledging more spending to stimulate Canada's sluggish economy. Photographer: Ben Nelms/Bloomerg
TORONTO, CANADA - OCTOBER 19: A supporter of former Prime Minister Stephen Harper during former Finance Minister Joe Oliver's election night reception, October 19, 2015 in Toronto, Canada. Oliver lost his seat to Liberal Marco Mendicino. Canadians went to the polls on October 19th and ousted Prime Minister Stephen Harper in favour of Justin Trudeau's Liberal party. (Photo by Ian Willms/Getty Images)
People walk into voting stations on election day in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. Canadians vote Monday in a tight federal election that polls suggest will bring Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party to power, ending the decade-long run of Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Conservatives. Photographer: James MacDonald/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A woman exits a voting station on election day in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. Canadians vote Monday in a tight federal election that polls suggest will bring Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party to power, ending the decade-long run of Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Conservatives. Photographer: James MacDonald/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau waits with his son Xavier to cast his ballot in Montreal on October 19, 2015. The first of 65,000 polling stations opened Monday on Canada's Atlantic seaboard for legislative elections that pitted Prime Minister Stephen's Tories against liberal and social democratic parties. Up to 26.4 million electors are expected to vote in 338 electoral districts. Some 3.6 million already cast a ballot in advance voting a week ago, and the turnout Monday is expected to be high. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 9: Liberal leader Justin Trudeau meets with the editorial board at the Toronto Star in Toronto. (Todd Korol/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
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Speaking at a conference in Madagascar, Trudeau stood by his original comments, but tried to frame them in a more historical context.

Recognizing issues surrounding Castro and his abuse of human rights, Trudeau said, "The fact is Fidel Castro had a deep and lasting impact on the Cuban people. He certainly was a polarizing figure and there certainly were significant concerns around human rights. That's something I'm open about and that I've highlighted."

Trudeau also defended himself, saying his statement was meant to show the deep connections between Canadians and Cubans and defended his own actions on human rights, name-checking Castro's brother, current Cuban president Raul.

Additionally, when asked if Castro was a dictator, Trudeau said, "yes."

Trudeau's original comments led to swift reaction on the internet, including — of course — a hashtag.

It's not the first time Trudeau found himself memed, and it surely won't be the last.

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