Australia says Islamic State recruiter arrested in Turkey

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

An Australian citizen believed to be a top recruiter for Islamic State has been arrested by Turkish authorities and will be subject to a formal extradition request from Australia, the Australian government said on Saturday.

A man believed to be Neil Prakash, who was linked to several Australia-based attack plans, has been detained in Turkey and was being interrogated by Turkish authorities, a government spokesperson said in an emailed statement.

"The arrest of the person we believe is Prakash is the result of close collaboration between Australian and Turkish authorities," the spokesperson said.

13 PHOTOS
Erasing the legacy of the Islamic State
See Gallery
Erasing the legacy of the Islamic State
A member of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA), seen with a mural of the Islamic State in the background, stands guard in front of a building in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) fighters patrol in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) fighters are seen as they rest in a building in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
Women sit in front of their home in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
A girl carries water in a plastic can, with Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) fighters in the background, in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
A member of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA), seen with the Islamic State flags in the background, walks outside of a building in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
A boy holding a rifle stands next to a member of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) fighters are seen in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
Members of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) are pictured as they look out from a building in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
A member of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) patrols in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
A member of Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) is pictured in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas
A member of the Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army (FSA) patrols in the border town of Jarablus, Syria, August 31, 2016. REUTERS/Umit Bektas TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Melbourne-born Prakash appeared in Islamic State videos and magazines and actively recruited Australian men, women and children and encouraged acts of terrorism, the Australian government said in May.

The spokesperson said Australia was working closely with Turkish authorities and Prakash would be subject to a formal extradition request.

Australia said in May that Prakash was killed in an airstrike in Mosul, Iraq, on April 29, based on U.S. intelligence.

But the New York Times reported on Friday that he had been wounded in the attack and survived. The Australian government subsequently confirmed he was alive.

Australia last year announced financial sanctions against Prakash, including threatening anyone giving financial assistance with punishment of up to 10 years in jail.

(Reporting by Harry Pearl; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)


Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners