New poll: Majority of Americans think the US is divided

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This probably isn't surprising, but Americans feel very divided right now. And Gallup has some empirical data to prove it.

The polling organization found 77 percent of Americans believe the nation is more divided than united on its fundamental values. That's the highest percentage Gallup has recorded over the past 20 years.

Related: Thousands protest Donald Trump across the nation

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Thousands protest Donald Trump across the nation
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Thousands protest Donald Trump across the nation
Demonstrators protest outside of City Hall following the election of Republican Donald Trump as President of the United States in downtown Los Angeles, California November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
SOUTH GATE, CA - NOVEMBER 10: Students in South Gate protest the election Donald Trump as president in front of City Hall. (Photo by Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - NOVEMBER 10: Protesters of President-elect Donald Trump march down the I-94 on November 10, 2016 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Thousands of people across the country have taken to the streets in protest in the days following the election of Republican Donald Trump over Democrat Hillary Clinton. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
Demonstrators gesture toward an approaching line of police officers as they stopped traffic on Interstate 580 during a demonstration following the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States, in Oakland, California, U.S. November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

Thousands of anti-Trump protesters shut down 5th Avenue in front of Trump Tower as New Yorkers react to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in an upset to become the 45th president.

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Protesters reach Trump Tower as they march against Republican president-elect Donald Trump in the neighborhood of Manhattan in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)

Protestors hanging onto a signpost shout slogans on 5th Avenue across from Trump Tower on November 9, 2016 in New York, after Donald Trump was elected as the next president of the US.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

People march in protest to the election of Republican Donald Trump as the president of the United States in Seattle, Washington, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jason Redmond)

Office workers show their support for protesters marching along Sixth Avenue, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York, in opposition of Donald Trump's presidential election victory.

(AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

The Empire State Building is seen in the background as demonstrators hold a sign during a march against President-elect Donald Trump in Manhattan, New York, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Andrew Kelly)

Demonstrators protest on top of a bus outside of the Trump Tower November 9, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. Thousands of people across the United States took to the streets in protest a day after Republican Donald Trump was elected president, defeating Democrat Hillary Clinton.

(Photo by John Gress/Getty Images)

Remy joins protestors marching against Republican Donald Trump's victory in Tuesday's U.S. presidential election in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Mark Makela)

People try to reach Trump Tower as they protest against Republican president-elect Donald Trump in the neighborhood of Manhattan in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)

A demonstrator wears a headpiece depicting the crown of the Statue of Liberty during a protest in San Francisco, California, U.S. following the election of Donald Trump as the president of the United States November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Stephen Lam)

Protesters burn an effigy of Donald Trump in Lee Circle before a march through New Orleans, La., November 9, 2016.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Protestors rally against Donald Trump outside of Trump Tower, November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset.

(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

People protest against Republican president-elect Donald Trump in the neighborhood of Manhattan in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz/TEMPLATE OUT/TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Demonstrators walk through Downtown San Diego in protest to the election of Republican Donald Trump as the president of the United States in San Diego, California, U.S. November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Sandy Huffaker)

A woman chants from a window as demonstrators march on Market Street in San Francisco, California, U.S. following the election of Donald Trump as the president of the United States November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Stephen Lam)

People climb a pole on Fifth Avenue outside Trump Tower during protests following President-elect Donald Trump's election victory in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Andrew Kelly)

Security forces stand guard in front of the Trump Tower during a protest against President-elect Donald Trump of Republican Party in Chicago, United States on November 9, 2016.

(Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Protestors brandish a tattered US national flag during a demonstration on 5th Avenue across from Trump Tower on November 9, 2016 in New York, after Donald Trump was elected as the next president of the US.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

People take part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in New York City on November 9, 2016.

(KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

A protester carries an upside down American flag as she walks along Sixth Avenue while demonstrating against President-elect Donald Trump, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York. Thousands of protesters around the country took to the streets Wednesday to condemn the election of Trump as president.

(AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Protesters burn a U.S. flag while they reach Trump Tower as they march against Republican president-elect Donald Trump in the neighborhood of Manhattan in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)

People take part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump in New York City on November 9, 2016.

(KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

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More from Newsy: These Chicagoans Refuse To Unite For A Donald Trump Presidency

Gallup's polling suggests Americans have generally been more likely to describe the country as divided than united — except after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which flipped the trend.

The divide falls along partisan lines — Democrats are more likely than Republicans to view the country as divided.

That tracks with Gallup's previous post-election surveys, which found members of the losing party believed the country was more divided.

Related: Anti-Trump protests in New York City

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Anti-Trump protests in New York City
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Anti-Trump protests in New York City
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people march towards Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12 : Thousands of people gather outside Trump Tower during a protest against US President-elect Donald Trump in New York, United States on November 12, 2016. (Photo by Volkan Furuncu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
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In the most recent survey, 83 percent of Democrats told Gallup they felt the country was more divided than united, compared to 68 percent of Republicans and 78 percent of independents who felt the same way.

In 2012, 80 percent of Republicans thought the country was divided, as opposed to 63 percent of Democrats. And in 2004, 70 percent of Democrats viewed the country as divided, compared with 59 percent of Republicans.

More from Newsy: Even After The Election, Clinton Polls Better Than Trump

But this time, fewer Americans than before are hopeful the new president-elect will be able to unite the country: 45 percent of respondents told Gallup Donald Trump would do more to unite the country than divide it.

When Obama was re-elected in 2012, 55 percent of respondents said he'd do more to unite than divide the country. George W. Bush received similar support from 57 percent of respondents after his 2004 win.

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