Today's turkeys are monstrous super birds, more than twice as big as in 1929

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Are you supporting inhumane factory farming this Thanksgiving?

"The vast majority of turkeys are still being raised in conventional farms in crowded warehouses with barely enough room to move," says Daisy Freund, director of ASPCA's farm welfare program.

What's more, most turkeys grow dangerously fast and large, with breasts so big they can't copulate and may have trouble walking or breathing.

"They weighed 13 pounds in the 1930s and they weigh more than 30 pounds today, so that's really a different animal growing on largely the same skeletal structure and suffering as a result," Freund says.

Related: Also see presidential turkey pardons:

14 PHOTOS
A history of presidential turkey pardons
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A history of presidential turkey pardons
National Turkey Federation Chairman Jihad Douglas watches at right as President Barack Obama pardons National Thanksgiving Turkey Abe, during a ceremony in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015. This is the 68th anniversary of the National Thanksgiving Turkey presentation. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Nixon Giving Annual Pardon to Thanksgiving Turkey (Photo by © Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
Pres. Ronald Reagan and the annual Pardong of the Thanksgiving Turkey. (Photo By: /NY Daily News via Getty Images)
President Bush gestures during a Rose Garden ceremony Tuesday, November 25, 1992 where he pardoned this years Thanksgiving turkey presented by the National Turkey Federation. Chuck Helms, left, and Bruce Cuddy stand behind Bush. (AP Photo/Greg Gibson)
WASHINGTON, : US President Bill Clinton stands with the annual Thanksgiving turkey as his handler Walter Gislason (L) looks on during presentation ceremonies 24 November at the White House in Washington, DC. The bird, presented to the President by the National Turkey Federation was given an official pardon from becoming dinner and sent to a local petting zoo. AFP PHOTO/Tim SLOAN (Photo credit should read TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, : US President George W. Bush, with Chairman of the National Turkey Federation Ron Prestige (L) and President of the National Turkey Federation Dr. Alice Johnson (C), looks at Katie the turkey 26 November 2002 after he granted the turkey a presidential pardon in a Rose Garden Ceremony at the White House in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/Shawn THEW (Photo credit should read SHAWN THEW/AFP/Getty Images)
ST/PARDON 11/17/2004 Robert A. Reeder TWP Annual event at the White House where the President pardons a turkey, this one named Biscuits, a West Virginia bird. Ceremony took place in the Rose Garden. Here, Bush holds Biscuit by the neck. Behind the turkey is Daniel Karunakaren.
WASHINGTON - NOVEMBER 25: U.S. President Barack Obama pats a turkey named 'Courage' as daughter Sasha (2nd R) looks on during an event to pardon the 20-week-old and 45-pound turkey at the North Portico of the White House November 25, 2009 in Washington, DC. The Presidential pardon of a turkey has been a long time Thanksgiving tradition that dates back to the Harry Truman administration. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama (2nd L) gestures with his daughters Sasha (2nd R) and Malia (R) in the Rose Garden of the White House during the annual Thanksgiving turkey pardon November 21, 2012 in Washington, DC, as National Turkey Federation Chairman Steve Willardsen holds Cobbler. Obama pardoned turkeys Cobbler and Gobbler, both raised in Rockingham County, Virginia. The turkeys will then spend the rest of the holiday season on display at George Washington's Mount Vernon estate. The turkeys were raised by Craig and Nancy Miller in Rockingham County, Virginia. AFP Photo/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 26: At two feet tall and about 38 pounds, two full-grown Broad Breasted White domesticated turkeys are paraded before members of the news media in the Crystal Ballroom of the Willard InterContinental November 26, 2013 in Washington, DC. The birds were raised by the National Turkey Federation Chairman John Burkel of Badger, Minnesota, and one of the turkeys will be pardoned Wednesday by U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 27: President Barack Obama with his daughters by his side, Sasha and malia, ceremoniously pardon Popcorn the turkey during the annual 2013 National Thanksgiving Turkey Pardoning Ceremony on the north portico of the White House on Wednesday, November 27, 2013. The turkey, and turkey alternate, will be driven to George Washingtons Mount Vernon Estate and Gardens. And will be on display for visitors during Christmas at Mount Vernon, through January 6. (Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - NOVEMBER 06: A Nicholas White turkey, one of two presidential turkey candidates, sits in an enclosure during a press conference at the InterContinental Hotel on November 6, 2015 in San Francisco, California. Two presidential turkey candidates, known as Tom 1 and Tom 2, are contending for the honor of being named the 2015 National Thanksgiving turkey and being pardoned by U.S. president Barack Obama during a pardoning ceremony at the White House before Thanksgiving. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 25: U.S. President Barack Obama (C) 'pardons' Abe, a 42-pound male turkey during a ceremony with National Turkey Federation Chairman Jihad Douglas (R) and turkey farmer Joe Hedden in the Rose Garden at the White House November 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. In a tradition dating back to 1947, the president pardons a turkey, sparing the tom -- and his alternate -- from becoming a Thanksgiving Day feast. This year, Americans were asked to choose which of two turkeys would be pardoned and to cast their votes on Twitter. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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The US turkey industry has increased bird weight dramatically through careful breeding and nutrition science.

The following image from an NC State study shows a typical modern breed next to a typical breed from 1966 at 6 weeks old—where the modern breed weighs about twice as much:

66 vs now turkeys

Here's a chart of turkey growth since 1929:

turkey growth since 29

America is actually making progress on farm animal welfare, according to the ASPCA, with a rise in welfare certifications, a decline in caged animals, and more attention to crowding of chicken.

With turkeys, "there are a small number of higher welfare pasture- or welfare-certified turkey products, and we see an increased interest in that pasture heritage," Freund says. Still, "the turkey industry has not had a huge amount of movement."

If you want to buy humane turkeys, ASPCA says you should watch out for deceptive labels and look for Certified Humane, Global Animal Partnership (step 2 and above), and Animal Welfare Approved.

Related: Also see all the stores that will be open for shopping on Thanksgiving:

29 PHOTOS
Complete list of store openings on Thanksgiving and Black Friday
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Complete list of store openings on Thanksgiving and Black Friday
Belk: Open 4 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 1 a.m. on Black Friday. Will reopen 6 a.m. on Black Friday.

Big Lots: Open 7 a.m. to midnight on Thanksgiving. Will reopen 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Black Friday.

Best Buy: Open 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 1 a.m. on Black Friday. Will reopen 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Costco: Open 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on Black Friday.

Dick's Sporting Goods: Open 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 2 a.m. on Black Friday. Will reopen 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Black Friday.

Dollar General: Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Thanksgiving. Will reopen 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

GameStop: Open 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Black Friday.

hhgregg: Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Home Depot: Open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Black Friday.

JCPenney: Open 3 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Kmart: Open 6 a.m. on Thanksgiving to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Kohl's: Open 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 12 a.m. on Saturday.

Lowe's: Open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Black Friday.

Macy's: Open 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 2 a.m. on Black Friday. Will reopen 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Marshalls: Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Michaels: Open 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 12 a.m. on Black Friday. Will reopen 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Nordstrom: Open 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday

Office Depot/OfficeMax: Open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Black Friday.

Old Navy: Open 4 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 12 a.m. on Saturday.

PetSmart: Open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Black Friday.

Sam's Club: Open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Black Friday.

Sears: Open 6 p.m. to midnight on Thanksgiving. Will reopen 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Staples: Open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Black Friday.

Target: Open 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 11 p.m. on Black Friday.

T.J. Maxx: Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Toys R Us: Open 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 11 p.m. on Black Friday.

Victoria's Secret: Open 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving to 10 p.m. on Black Friday.

Walmart: Open 6 p.m. Thanksgiving through Black Friday.

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