The Dead Sea is drying out at an alarming rate

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The salt lake located between Israel and Jordan known as the Dead Sea is drying out at an alarming rate.

The lake is shrinking by about 3.3 feet per year due to water resources being diverted from it for the use of a pipeline to supply water to Israel.

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Dead Sea
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Dead Sea

The thick layer of salt covers the stones, instantly drying in the sun on the Dead Sea shore, Ein Gedi, Israel.

(efesenko via Getty Images)

A beautiful sunrise is reflected in a pool of water in a sinkhole that was formed on the coast of the dead sea due to lack of rain water and excessive usage of the rain water that does fall.Salt formations can be seen on the ground around it.

(Ilan Shacham via Getty Images)

Clouds are seen above the Dead Sea north of Ein Gedi February 22, 2009. Warnings continue that the Dead Sea is slowly but surely drying up, and could be gone completely in 50 years if no action is taken.The water level is dropping at close to three feet per year due to a sharp decrease in inflow from the Jordan and other rivers whose waters now irrigate fields.

(REUTERS/Yannis Behrakis)

Waterfall in national park Ein Gedi near the Dead Sea in Israel.

(Getty Images)

An aerial view photo shows sinkholes created by the drying of the Dead Sea, near Kibbutz Ein Gedi, on November 10, 2011. The Dead Sea is one of the sites candidate of other 28 sits in a international online campaign votes to select the new Seven Wonders of World Heritage Sites.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Mineral deposits can be seen at the shore of the dead sea near Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016.

(REUTERS/Nir Elias)

A picture taken on February 8, 2014 near Ein Gedi, in Israel shows the Dead Sea shoreline shaped by the decline in water levels as a result of the drying up. The Dead Sea, 400 meters below sea level, is the lowest point on earth and its mineral-rich waters and shores have been celebrated for their cleansing, healing and therapeutic properties. In the background is the Jordanian coast.

(THOMAS COEX/AFP/Getty Images)

The path from the evaporated salt in the Dead Sea. Israel

(Getty Images)

Bathers in the Dead Sea, with salty shoreline, Ein Bokek beach, Israel, Middle East

(Eleanor Scriven via Getty Images)

Dead Sea, Israel.

(Peter Ginter via Getty Images)

Dead Sea

(Getty Images)

A beautiful sunrise is reflected in the calm of waters of the dead sea in Israel, with a small island of salt harboring a dead tree.

(Ilan Shacham via Getty Images)

An aerial view photo shows sinkholes created by the drying of the Dead Sea, near Kibbutz Ein Gedi, on November 10, 2011. The Dead Sea is one of the sites candidate of other 28 sits in a international online campaign votes to select the new Seven Wonders of World Heritage Sites.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

A general view shows part of the Dead Sea in Jordan, November 5, 2016.

(REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed)

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Another reason it's losing water is mineral extraction. Minerals from the Dead Sea are often used in cosmetics and other products.

In 2015, Israel and Jordan signed a $900 million dollar deal in an attempt to stabilize the water levels of the Dead Sea.

The Dead Sea remains a popular travel destination, with many flocking to the lake which is 34% salt.

A group of marathon swimmers recently swam a stretch of the Dead Sea to bring awareness to the falling water levels. They wore protective face masks, but one still said the water was "like acid burning your eyeballs."

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Swimmers cross the Dead Sea for eco-campaign
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Swimmers cross the Dead Sea for eco-campaign
A general view shows the shore of the Dead Sea as it is seen from off shore while environmental activists take part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
A research boat can be seen on the dead sea while environmental activists take part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
An environmental activist takes part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
Environmental activists take part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
Environmental activists react after they finish "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
Environmental activists take part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
Environmental activists wash themselves after they finish "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
An environmental activist adjusts his mask while taking part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
Environmental activists take part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
An environmental activist washes her face while taking part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
Mineral deposits can be seen at the shore of the dead sea near Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
Environmental activists cheer each other as they finish "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
A research boat is seen on the dead sea while environmental activists take part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
Environmental activists cheer each other as they finish "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias
Environmental activists take part in "The Dead Sea Swim Challenge", swimming from the Jordanian to Israeli shore, to draw attention to the ecological threats facing the Dead Sea, in Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Israel November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nir Elias 
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