Reince Priebus on Muslim registry: 'Not going to rule out anything'

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Incoming White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus said Sunday on NBC's "Meet The Press" that President-elect Donald Trump's team is not planning to create a Muslim registry, but would not rule anything out.

"Look I'm not going to rule out anything," Priebus said. "We're not going to have a registry based on a religion. But what I think what we're trying to do is say that there are some people, certainly not all people... there are some people that are radicalized. And there are some people that have to be prevented from coming into this country. And Donald Trump's position, President Trump's position is consistent with bills in the House and the Senate that say the following: If you want to come from a place or an area around the world that harbors and trains terrorists, we have to temporarily suspend that operation until a better vetting system is put in place."

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Life as a Muslim teenager in America
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Life as a Muslim teenager in America
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, studies during her math class at Northwest High School in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, helps to move prom dresses for a fundraiser at Northwest High School in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, attends her math class at Northwest High School in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: With a U.S. flag in the foreground, Hannah Shraim, 17, left, talks with Elissa Suarez, 14, right, during a gathering of the Jaguar Ambassadors Club at Northwest High School in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, left, talks with Elissa Suarez, 14, right, and other members of the Jaguar Ambassadors Club at Northwest High School in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, walks past a student art image of a veiled woman as she helps to move prom dresses for a fundraiser at Northwest High School in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, center, studies with friends for their final exams at a Starbucks in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. With Shraim are Mekhala Rao, 17, left, Bobby Sood, 18, and Megan Lynch, 18. An observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day, wears the hijab, and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. âSome of my friend not being my friends after I started wearing the hijab was unexpected. But overall I was focused on what would happen inside my high school,â says Shraim, âI never thought about how the outside world would react. I immediately noticed that when I would go outside people would definitely look at me and I would get more stares. So I noticed Iâd become more of a focus when I walked into a room. Now I can differentiate between curious stares and hateful stares. I didnât realize I would be drawing that much attention.â (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, center, turns to chat with other students before an after-hours study session for their math final at Northwest High School in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, prays in her room at home after finishing her day at Northwest High School in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, right, jokes with Mekhala Rao, 17, while studying for their final exams at a Starbucks in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, left, walks through the hallway between classes at Northwest High School in Germantown, Md., Tuesday, May 10, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, has her makeup done by Farah Kuriashi as she prepares to attend Northwest High School's senior prom, in Germantown, Md., Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, right, has her makeup done by Farah Kuriashi as she and friends Hannah Reid, and Madison Detlefs, prepare to attend Northwest High School's senior prom, in Germantown, Md., on Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, affixes her hijab that she bought to match a special prom dress she ordered from a Turkish website that specializes in modest fashion, as she prepares to attend Northwest High School's senior prom, in Germantown, Md., on Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, styles her hijab that she bought to match a special prom dress she ordered from a Turkish website that specializes in modest fashion, as she prepares to attend Northwest High School's senior prom with friends Lindsay Buck, 18, left, and Mekhala Rao, 17, in Germantown, Md., Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, helps Hannah Reid, 18, to fasten the top piece of her prom dress as the close friends prepare to attends Northwest High School's senior prom, in Germantown, Md., on Friday, May 13, 2016. Shraim specially ordered her prom dress from a Turkish website that specializes in modest fashion. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Shelly Szanto, 18, center left, and Hannah Shraim, 17, gather for a ladies group photo as their prom group takes photographs in Germantown, Md., before attending their senior prom, Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: After getting ready for her senior prom, Hannah Shraim, 17, poses with her mother, May Salloum-Shraim, for a photograph as a young girl exercising with a group runs past them in Germantown, Md., Friday, May 13, 2016. Shraim specially ordered her prom dress from a Turkish website that specializes in modest fashion. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Nails freshly manicured Hannah Shraim, 17, wears a wrist corsage as she meets her friends before they left to attend their senior prom, in Germantown, Md., Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, left, next to Hannah Reid, 18, looks out of the limousine as her prom group leaves Germantown, Md., to attend their senior prom for Northwest High School, Friday, May 13, 2016. Shraim went to prom solo while most of the others in the group brought dates. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, left, and Madison Detlefs call to the other girls to gather for a ladies group photo as their prom group takes photographs in Germantown, Md., before attending their senior prom, Friday, May 13, 2016. Shraim ordered her prom dress from a Turkish website that specializes in modest fashion. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, center, stands next to Ashley Riddle, right, as their prom group takes photographs for their parents in Germantown, Md., before attending their senior prom, Friday, May 13, 2016. Shraim and Riddle both went to prom solo while the others in the group brought dates. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, gets out of a limousine to attend her senior prom for Northwest High School, Friday, May 13, 2016, in Silver Spring, Md., at the Fillmore Theater. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." Although not the only Muslim student attending her diverse high schoolâs prom, she was the only student wearing a hijab among the hundreds of sequined dancers that evening. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, right, fixes her headscarf as she takes a break from dancing and chats with her friend's prom date during Northwest High School's senior prom in Silver Spring, Md., on Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." Although not the only Muslim student attending her diverse high schoolâs prom, she was the only student wearing a hijab among the hundreds of sequined dancers that evening. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, center, dances next to Shelly Szanto, 18, right, during their senior prom for Northwest High School, Friday, May 13, 2016, in Silver Spring, Md., at the Fillmore Theater. Shraim went to prom solo while the others in the group brought dates. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." Although not the only Muslim student attending her diverse high schoolâs prom, she was the only student wearing a hijab among the hundreds of sequined dancers that evening. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, right, dances next to Jahnavi Muralidarin during Northwest High School's senior prom held at the Fillmore Theater in Silver Spring, Md., on Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." Although not the only Muslim student attending her diverse high schoolâs prom, she was the only student wearing a hijab among the hundreds of sequined dancers that evening. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, dances with a group of friends as they attends senior prom in Germantown, on Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." Although not the only Muslim student attending her diverse high schoolâs prom, she was the only student wearing a hijab among the hundreds of sequined dancers that evening. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, center, dances with a group of her friends during their senior prom for Northwest High School, Friday, May 13, 2016, in Silver Spring, Md., at the Fillmore Theater. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." Although not the only Muslim student attending her diverse high schoolâs prom, she was the only student wearing a hijab among the hundreds of sequined dancers that evening. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Samantha Bischoff, left, compliments Hannah Shraim on her prom dress during Northwest High School's senior prom at the Fillmore Theater in Silver Spring, Md., on Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." Although not the only Muslim student attending her diverse high schoolâs prom, she was the only student wearing a hijab among the hundreds of sequined dancers that evening. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, takes a break from dancing while attending senior prom in Silver Spring, Md., on Friday, May 13, 2016. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." Although not the only Muslim student attending her diverse high schoolâs prom, she was the only student wearing a hijab among the hundreds of sequined dancers that evening. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim attends a study session of her youth group as part of the Muslim American Society of Maryland, in Germantown, Md., Saturday, May 7, 2016. The members of the youth group are also members of Girl Scout Troop 3797, a faith based troop. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, second from left, attends a study session of her youth group as part of the Muslim American Society of Maryland, in Germantown, Md., Saturday, May 7, 2016. The members of the youth group are also members of Girl Scout Troop 3797, a faith based troop. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
MUSLIMS IN AMERICA: Hannah Shraim, 17, right, leans against her friend Mariam Aiyad, 16, as the girls attends a study session with their youth group from the Muslim American Society of Maryland, in Germantown, Md., Saturday, May 7, 2016. The members of the youth group are also members of Girl Scout Troop 3797, a faith based troop. Senior class president and an observant Muslim, Shraim prays five times a day and hopes to become an advocate for Muslims in the United States. After convincing her parents that she was ready for the responsibility of wearing the hijab, she began wearing the Islamic headscarf in the 10th grade. It was a decision her parents were concerned about due to their fears of how strangers might treat her. "If Trump becomes the president then not just Muslims but a lot of people will live in fear of the future for themselves and their children," says Shraim, "given the scapegoating technique of pushing out minorities rather than focusing on how we can benefit everyone." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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Priebus further maintained that tougher screening was needed before the incoming administration could consider immigration.

"When a better vetting system is put in place then those radical folks, they'll not be allowed in, but then others will be allowed in, but only until that is done. That's what Gen. Michael Flynn believes and that's what President Trump believes."

When asked if Trump agrees with incoming National Security Adviser Flynn's past statement that "fear of Muslims is rational," Priebus said that the president-elect did not think that religious judgments should be categorical.

"He believes that no faith in and of itself should be judged as a whole," Priebus said. "But there are some people in countries abroad that need to be prevented... there are some people that need to be prevented from coming into this country. So I think that's where 99 percent of Americans are at."

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