Donald Trump said he saved a Ford plant that was never leaving

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A man dedicated a portion of his Thursday night to tweeting falsehoods. Normally, this would not be newsworthy, except that said man is also the president-elect of the United States.

Donald Trump took to Twitter to claim that Ford would not be moving a plant from Kentucky to Mexico, and said that the car company's chairman, Bill Ford Jr., called him personally to tell him so.

Related: Trump's life leading up to the election

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Donald Trump's life leading up to the election
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Donald Trump's life leading up to the election

Bound for the rigors of business school in the future, Donald Trump received discipline at an early age by attending a military academy. There, he reportedly excelled in extracurricular activities such as being the Honor Cadet.

Donald Trump in the New York Military Academy's 1964 yearbook

Source: Classmates

As someone who loves the art of negotiation, Donald Trump was able to negotiate New York City to provide a 40-year tax abatement for the Grand Hyatt Hotel — the first ever granted to a commercial property.

Governor Hugh Carey points to an artists' conception of the new New York Hyatt Hotel/Convention facility that will be build on the site of the former Commordore Hotel, June 28, 1978.  (AP Photo)

Source: The Trump Organization

Master renovator: Trump offered to renovate decrepit areas in need, such as a long-closed ice-skating rink, at no profit to himself, after the city's renovation effort went through five years of delays and more than double the original cost estimate.

Developer Donald Trump, right, poses with New York City's Park Commissioner Henry Stern holding a pair of ice skates that are intended for use at the Wollman Skating Rink Central Park in New York, Aug. 7, 1986.  (AP Photo/G. Paul Burnett)

Source: AP

Trump's enterprise also stretched out into sports, where he was the original owner of the New Jersey Generals of the United States Football League.

In this March 8, 1984 photo, Donald Trump shakes hands with Herschel Walker in New York after agreement on a 4-year contract with the New Jersey Generals USFL football team.  (AP Photo/Dave Pickoff, File)

Trump owns a fleet of luxury helicopters.

 Donald Trump poses in front of one of three Sikorsky helicopters at New York Port Authority's West 30 Street Heliport on March 22, 1988. (AP Photo/Wilbur Funches)

Trump also enjoys tennis — he even played a round, wearing his traditional suit, against the legendary Serena Williams.

Developer Donald Trump talks with his former wife Ivana Trump during the men's final at the U.S. Open September 7, 1997. REUTERS/File Photo 

Trump was also notorious for befriending attractive supermodels. His first wife, Ivana, a Czech-American, was a member of the social elite.

Donald Trump and his wife, Ivana, pose outside the Federal Courthouse after she was sworn in as a United States citizen, May 1988. (AP Photo)

No expense was spared for his belongings, as Donald Trump once paid the sultan of Brunei $30 million for a nearly 300-foot yacht.

In this July 4, 1998 photo, Donald Trump waves to reporters with his former wife, Ivana, as they board their yacht "The Trump Princess" in New York. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler, File)

Being the entertaining host, Trump also spared no expense in providing a spectacular show for friends and family.

 Developer and multi-millionaire Donald Trump (R) watches as ex-wife Marla Maples gets a kiss from Earl Sinclair of TV's 'Dinosaurs' during lunch at the Trump Plaza Hotel November 2, 1992. REUTERS/Henry Ray Abrams

As a self-proclaimed family man, Trump attended many public events and television shows with his family, even before his current campaign.

 Donald Trump and Ivanka Trump attend U.S. Open Tennis Tournament on August 30, 1991 at Flushing Meadows Park in New York City. (Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)

Source: Oprah

Trump first started showing signs of interest for a possible bid for the US presidency with the formation of a presidential exploratory committee ahead of the 2000 election.

Billionaire real estate developer Donald Trump (R) talks with host Larry King after taping a segment of King's CNN talk show, in New York October 7. Reuters

Source: Reuters

To test the political waters, the potential Reform Party presidential candidate traveled to several areas to address party leaders.

New York billionaire real estate tycoon Donald Trump made an appearance for the media atop a Beverly Hills, Calif., hotel Monday, Dec. 6, 1999. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)

Source: AP

In 2005, Donald Trump married fashion designer and model Melania Trump.

Real estate magnate Donald Trump (L) and Melania Trump leave Hollinger International's annual meeting at the Metropolitan Club in New York on May 22, 2003.

REUTERS/Peter Morgan PM/ME

Source: PolitiFact

As no stranger to the political process, Donald Trump was even acquainted with members of the judicial branch.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas (L), serving as the grand marshal for the Daytona 500, speaks to Donald Trump  on the starting grid at the Daytona International Speedway February 14. JLS/ELD

He also became the owner of the infamous Miss Universe beauty pageant for many years.

 Donald Trump and Miss Connecticut USA Erin Brady pose onstage after Brady won the 2013 Miss USA pageant, Sunday, June 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Jeff Bottari)

Unbeknownst to many, Donald Trump is a formidable opponent on the green. He owns 15 golf courses.

Real Estate mongul Donald Trump takes a swing on the 11th green of his newly acquired Ocean Trails Golf Club in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 9, 2002.  (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Source: Golf

Sometimes, negotiating can be a tough sport. What better way to exert your dominance by taking the center stage among the world's most bombastic figures?

Donald Trump, left, and Bobby Lashley, right shave the head of Vince McMahon after Lashley defeated Umaga Detroit, Sunday, April 1, 2007. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Trump famously launched his presidential campaign in June 2015 by coming down an escalator in Trump Tower. Since then, he has weathered waves of controversy to become the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

 (Photo by Christopher Gregory/Getty Images)

As the fog of the political battlefield has cleared on the Republican side, Trump is now preparing for a likely battle with presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

(AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Trump made his final appeal to voters in swing-states as the contentious campaign drew to a close.

 Donald Trump speaks at a rally at SNHU Arena in Manchester, NH, on Nov. 7, 2016, the night before election day. (Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

President-elect Trump at his election night party at the Hilton Hotel in New York City.

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Republican president-elect Donald Trump acknowledges the crowd during his election night event. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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According to Trump, he is already saving Kentucky jobs by convincing car manufacturers to stay there, and he is doing it at least partially because Kentucky voted for him in the presidential election. It is concerning, if not surprising, that the future president is apparently playing favorites with states based on which ones like him best. But it is perhaps more concerning that the future president is demonstrating the same propensity towards exaggeration at best and outright lies at worst on social media that he displayed before he won the presidential election.

More from Vocativ: Turkey Overwhelmingly Leads World In Twitter Censorship

According to basically every reputable news source and as well as the Ford company itself, there were never any plans for either of the two Ford plants in Kentucky to leave the state for Mexico or anywhere else.

Reuters reports that "Ford has repeatedly said it has no plans to close any U.S. plants and likely could not do so under the terms of the current United Auto Workers contract that expires in 2019," while the Wall Street Journal said that while Ford had "initially planned" to move production of a Lincoln SUV that Reuters describes as "low-selling" out of the state (though where that production would move to — Mexico or otherwise — was never stated), that was so the plant that produced it could devote more resources to the Ford Escape. In summary: The plant itself was never in danger of closing, and it doesn't appear that it would have lost any jobs by stopping its production of that Lincoln SUV, as they would have been re-allocated to the Ford Escape.

More from Vocativ: After Coup Attempt, Turkey Cracks Down Even Harder

The Louisville Courier-Journal published Ford's statement on the matter where it diplomatically and carefully said that it "continue[d] to engage with President-elect Trump's team" and "shared our commitment to continue to investing in the US and creating American jobs." It said that on Thursday, Ford "confirmed with the President-elect that our small Lincoln utility vehicle made at the Louisville Assembly Plant will stay in Kentucky." So, yes, at least part of Trump's tweets are true. The company also made sure to note that it has invested $12 billion in American plants and created almost 28,000 jobs in the last five years (thanks Obama).

Related: Trump's transition team

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Donald Trump's transition team
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Donald Trump's transition team
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and Chairman of the Republican National Committee Reince Priebus address supporters during his election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence attends a campaign rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S. November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Campaign CEO Stephen Bannon departs the offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Governor Chris Christie speaks to supporters in West Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. January 31, 2016. REUTERS/Brian C. Frank/File Photo
Former candidate Ben Carson arrives to attend the third and final 2016 presidential campaign debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton at UNLV in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 19, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani leaves the offices of Republican President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S., November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
Defense Intelligence Agency director U.S. Army Lt. General Michael Flynn testifies before the House Intelligence Committee on "Worldwide Threats" in Washington February 4, 2014. REUTERS/Gary Cameron/File photo TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions (R-Al) speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican President-elect Donald Trump's daughter Ivanka Trump arrives at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S., November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Son of Republican President-elect Donald Trump Eric Trump gives the thumbs up as he arrives at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S., November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Donald Trump Jr. sits between his wife Vanessa (L) and his brother Eric Trump (R) during the third and final debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton at UNLV in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 19, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Jared Kushner (L) and Stephen Bannon stand by as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a campaign rally in Canton, Ohio, U.S., September 14, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
PayPal co-founder and Facebook board member Peter Thiel delivers his speech on the U.S. presidential election at the National Press Club in Washington, U.S., October 31, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
Steven Mnuchin, Chairman and Co-CEO of Dune Capital Management LP and Chairman and CEO of OneWest Bank Group LLC speaks at a panel discussion "Jump-Starting the Housing Market" at the 2009 Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills,California April 28, 2009. REUTERS/Fred Prouser (UNITED STATES BUSINESS)
Anthony Scaramucci, co-managing partner and founder of Skybridge Capital speaks at the opening of the annual Skybridge Alternatives Conference (SALT) in Las Vegas May 6, 2015. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Newly elected Congressmen Lou Barletta (R-PA) (R) and Tim Scott (R-SC) (C) arrive on Capitol Hill in Washington, November 17, 2010. The new members of the upcoming 112th Congress are going through orientation. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Representative Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 21, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. Representative Chris Collins (R-NY) flashes a thumbs-up before delivering his nomination speech at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
U.S. Representative Devin Nunes (R-CA) talks to reporters as he walks from the offices of House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) (not pictured) at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, October 15, 2013. Republicans in the House of Representatives failed to reach internal consensus on Tuesday on how to break an impasse on the federal budget that could soon result in an economically damaging default on the country's debt. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS MEDIA)
Campaign Communications Director Hope Hicks departs the offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
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If anything, Ford's original plans to move the Lincoln SUV's production would have been better for that plant's employees: According to the Louisville Courier-Journal, the plant sometimes shuts down for a few weeks when demand for the cars it produces is low, so that the supply can match that demand. When this happens, employees get just 80 percent of their usual pay. This happened just a few weeks ago because, the Courier-Journal said, the Lincoln SUV wasn't selling as well as the "fast-selling" Escape. Ridding the plant of the Lincoln model's production may well have saved employees from a few more weeks shutdowns and 80 percent wages. Oops!

More from Vocativ: Turkey's Failed Coup: Why No One Saw It Coming

Trump's "friend" Bill Ford said in October that Trump's criticism of Ford's factories in Mexico — which Trump repeatedly used as an example that America was losing manufacturing jobs to other countries as he campaigned on promises that he and he alone would bring those jobs back — was "infuriating" and "frustrating."

Last Tuesday, Ford said it was moving forward with its plans to produce all of its small cars in Mexico by 2018. This would not result in the closure of any plants nor the loss of any American jobs, Ford said. Those plans appear to be unaffected by Trump's phone calls with the company's chairman.

Since his win, Trump has used his Twitter feed to yell at the New York Times and claim that "wow, @nytimes is losing thousands of subscribers" when, in fact, it has actually gained tens of thousands of them since the election. He has also tweeted two very different takes on the protests across the country over his win just nine hours apart from each other. And he has praised the electoral college system that won him the election (Hillary Clinton is almost certain to win the popular vote by at least a million when the final count comes in), which was a much different opinion than in 2012, when he thought Mitt Romney won the popular vote and lost the electoral college (Romney actually lost both) and went on a tweet rant-storm about how the "phony electoral college made a laughingstock out of our nation" and called for a "revolution" against the "great and disgusting injustice" that a presidential candidate could win the popular vote but not actually be elected president. Trump has since deleted many of those tweets, for some reason.

The post Donald Trump Said He Saved A Ford Plant That Was Never Leaving appeared first on Vocativ.

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