Contenders for key jobs in Trump administration

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WASHINGTON, Nov 18 (Reuters) - New names for possible appointees to U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's Cabinet have emerged, including former CIA chief and retired General David Petraeus as a potential defense secretary, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

Petraeus resigned as CIA chief in 2012 after an extra-marital affair was revealed. Also under consideration as Pentagon chief are retired Marine General James Mattis, retired Army General Jack Keane, former national security adviser Stephen Hadley and former Senator Jim Talent, the Journal said.

Petraeus through the years

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Former CIA Director David Petraeus through the years
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Former CIA Director David Petraeus through the years

Former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (DCIA) under President Barack Obama, Gen. David Petraeus interviewed for the documentary, 'The Spymasters,' about CIA Directors for CBS/Showtime. With producers Chris Whipple, Gedeon and Jules Naudet, New York, New York, July 22, 2015.

(Photo David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)

Director, President and CEO of The Woodrow Wilson Center Hon. Jane Harman and Former Director, Central Intelligence Agency Gen. (Ret.) David H. Petraeus speak at the 2016 Concordia Summit - Day 1 at Grand Hyatt New York on September 19, 2016 in New York City.

(Photo by Ben Hider/Getty Images for Concordia Summit)

Robert DeNiro, Harvey Keitel and General David Petraeus attend the 2nd Annual Speyer Legacy School Access To Opportunity Initiative Benefit at Carnegie Hall on April 6, 2016 in New York City.

(Photo by Bobby Bank/WireImage)

Former CIA director David Petraeus speaks after leaving the Federal Courthouse in Charlotte, North Carolina, April 23, 2015. Petraeus was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay a $100,000 fine after pleading guilty to mishandling classified information.

(REUTERS/Chris Keane)

Former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency David Petraeus arrives for the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences awards Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, in Moffett Field, Calif. The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences recognizes excellence in research aimed at curing intractable diseases and extending human life. The prize is administered by the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences Foundation, a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to advancing breakthrough research, celebrating scientists and generating excitement about the pursuit of science as a career.

(AP Photo/Ben Margot)

CIA Director David Petraeus, center, stands with Admiral James A. Winnefeld, Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, right, before a baseball game between the Washington Nationals and the Miami Marlins at Nationals Park Sunday, Sept. 9, 2012, in Washington.

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

This Aug. 17, 2012 photo shows CIA Director David Petraeus, second from right, and Maj. Gen. James McConville, right, during a ceremony at Fort Campbell, Ky.

(AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Director of the Central Intelligence Agency General David Petraeus attends the Allen & Co Media Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho July 12, 2012. Petraeus resigned as CIA director on November 9, 2012 he publicly admitted to having engaged in an extramarital affair. Picture taken July 12, 2012.

(REUTERS/Jim Urquhart)

This Aug. 17, 2012 photo shows CIA Director David Petraeus, left, and his wife, Holly, during a ceremony at Fort Campbell, Ky.

(AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

In this handout image provided by the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), former Commander of International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces-Afghanistan; CIA Director Gen. Davis Petraeus shakes hands with biographer Paula Broadwell, co-author of 'All In: The Education of General David Petraeus' on July 13, 2011. CIA Director Gen. David Petraeus resigned from his post on November 9, 2012, citing an extra-marital affair with Paula Broadwell. The FBI began an investigation after it was tipped off by Jill Kelley, a long-time friend of the Petraeus family, who received threatening emails from Broadwell.

(Photo by ISAF via Getty Images)

In this Aug. 31, 2011 file photo, former Commander of International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces-Afghanistan Gen. Davis Petraeus, standing with his wife Holly, participates in an armed forces farewell tribute and retirement ceremony at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall in Arlington, Va. Gen. Petraeus, the retired four-star general who led the U.S. military campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, resigned Friday, Nov. 9, 2012 as director of the CIA after admitting he had an extramarital affair.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Jill Kelley, General David Petraeus, Holly Petraeus, Jill Kelley and Scott Kelley (l.- r.) attending event in which Gen. Petraeus was presented with community service award at the home of Jill and Scott Kelley during summer of 2011.

(New York Daily News Exclusive via Getty Images)

US General David Petraeus (2nd L) attends a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, German Defence Minister Karl Theodor zu Guttenberg and Afghan President Hamid Karsai (not in picture) during an unannounced visit to the German Army's base in the Afghan city of Masar-i-Sharif on December 18, 2010.

(STEFFEN KUGLER/AFP/Getty Images)

US President Barack Obama walks off Air Force One upon landing for an unscheduled visit to Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan December 3, 2010, and is greeted by US commander in Afghanistan General David Petraeus and US Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl W. Eikenberry (behind).

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S Army General David Petraeus, commander of the Multi-National Force in Iraq, testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, April 8, 2008. Petraeus said progress in Iraq is too "fragile and reversible'' to allow for U.S. troop levels to fall below about 140,000 earlier than September.

(Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

US Army General David Petraeus, incoming commander of US Central Command and former commanding general of the Multi-National Force in Iraq, interacts with other guest riders after returning to the White House following a bicycle ride with US President George W. Bush, in Washington, October 11, 2008.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

U.S. Army General David Petraeus throws out the first pitch prior to Game 2 of Major League Baseball's World Series between the Tampa Bay Rays and Philadelphia Phillies in St. Petersburg, Florida, October 23, 2008.

(REUTERS/Scott Audette)

U.S. Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) listens as U.S. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus provides a situation update on Iraq to a congressional delegation in Baghdad, July 21, 2008. Obama and other members of the delegation met with Iraqi leaders and U.S. military commanders in a visit overshadowed by the question of when U.S. troops should go home.

(REUTERS/Lorie Jewell/Multi-National Forces Iraq Public Affairs/Handout)

Gen. David Petraeus, the top commander for U.S. troops in Iraq, appears at a graduation ceremony for 700 Iraqi National Police cadets in Baghdad, Iraq, on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2007.

(AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)

U.S. Commander in Iraq, Gen. David Petraeus wearing a military helmet gives a gift to a Iraqi child a soccer ball which reads" General David Petraeus" during his visit at the village of Jadihah northeast of Baghdad, Iraq, on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2007. Despite Petraeus have listened from people that the security has improved dramatically he has a new, if more distant, problem nagging at his mind and that is Turkey's threat to cross into Iraq to chase Kurdish militants. "We're very worried about that," he said.

(AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed )

U.S. President George W. Bush speaks to reporters following a meeting on the war in Iraq at the White House in Washington October 5, 2005. Standing with Bush are the former commander of the multi-national security and transition command U.S. Army Major General David H. Petraeus (L) and U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

General David Petraeus, the three-star U.S. General charged with overseeing the transition of power from the Coalition military authorities to the Iraqis poses June 21, 2004 in Najaf, Iraq.

(Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images)

U.S. Lt. General David Petraeus, commander of the 101st. Airborne Division shakes hands with an Iraqi Army soldier celebrating his graduation in Kirkush Military Training base, July 8, 2004. Columns of 720 soldiers of the newly U.S-trained Iraqi Army celebrated their graduation on Thursday as part of U.S initial plan of creating a new Iraqi army division numbering 12,000 troops within a year to replace 400,000-strong army dispended by the U.S led coalition authority after the fall of Baghdad on April 2003.

(Zohra Bensemra / Reuters)

Paul Bremer (L), the the U.S. administrator for Iraq listens to US Commander Maj. Gen. David Petraeus upon his arrival at Mosul airport in northern Iraq before a short helicopter tour of the city 18 May 2003. The U.S. administrator for Iraq, Paul Bremer, said on Sunday he was pushing ahead with setting up an Iraqi interim authority, denying media reports that Washington was suspending the transition process.

(REUTERS/Roberto Schmidt/POOL JV)

In this handout photo from the U.S. Army, Maj. Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), speaks during the 716th Military Police Battalion during a assumption of command ceremony November 2, 2003 in Babylon, Iraq. Lt. Col. Ashton L. Hayes took command of the battalion after former commander Lt. Col. Kim S. Orlando was killed Oct. 16 in Karbala, Iraq.

(Photo by Chris Jones/U.S. Army via Getty Images)

Major General David Petraeus, commander of the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne division meets with local Kurd and Arab leaders July 26, 2003 in the ethnically mixed town of Domiz, in northern Iraq. Petraeus was the guest of honor at a dinner hosted by the leaders and participated in a ribbon cutting ceremony for a new hospital clinic built with the aid of the U.S. Army there.

(Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images)

David H. Petraeus got a diploma from the U.S. Military Academy and the boss's daughter as well. The cadet captain and assistant brigade adjutant, who comes from Cornwall-On-The-Hudson, New York, is to marry Holly Knowlton, daughter of West Point Superintendent Lt. General William Knowlton.

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

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Keane said on Twitter on Friday that he will not be joining the new administration.

On Saturday, Trump is scheduled to meet with 2012 presidential candidate Mitt Romney and could discuss the possibility of him becoming secretary of state, as he works to fill administration positions ahead of his inauguration on Jan. 20.

On Friday it was announced that Trump had chosen Republican Senator Jeff Sessions to be attorney general, retired Lieutenant General Michael Flynn to be national security adviser and Republican Congressman Mike Pompeo to head the CIA.

Trump announced on Sunday he would hire Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus as White House chief of staff and named Stephen Bannon, former head of the conservative website Breitbart News, as his chief strategist and senior counselor.

Below are people mentioned as contenders for senior roles.

TREASURY SECRETARY

* Steven Mnuchin, former Goldman Sachs Group Inc executive and Trump's campaign finance chairman

* Jeb Hensarling, U.S. representative from Texas and chairman of the House Financial Services Committee

* Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan Chase & Co chief executive officer

* Tom Barrack, founder and chairman of Colony Capital Inc

SECRETARY OF STATE

* Mitt Romney, 2012 presidential nominee and former Massachusetts governor

* Rudy Giuliani, former mayor of New York City

* Nikki Haley, governor of South Carolina

* Jeff Sessions, U.S. senator from Alabama and early Trump supporter, member of the Senate Armed Services Committee

* John Bolton, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under President George W. Bush

* Bob Corker, U.S. senator from Tennessee and chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee

* Zalmay Khalilzad, former U.S. ambassador to Iraq

DEFENSE SECRETARY

* David Petraeus, ex-CIA director and retired general

* Tom Cotton, U.S. senator from Arkansas

* Jon Kyl, former U.S. senator from Arizona

* Duncan Hunter, U.S. representative from California and early Trump supporter, member of the House Armed Services Committee

* Jim Talent, former U.S. senator from Missouri who was on the Senate Armed Services Committee

* Kelly Ayotte, outgoing U.S. senator from New Hampshire and member of the Senate Armed Services Committee

ATTORNEY GENERAL

* Jeff Sessions, senior member of the Senate Judiciary Committee who takes a hard line on immigration, was announced as the choice on Nov. 18.

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SECRETARY

* Tom Price, U.S. representative from Georgia who is an orthopedic surgeon

* Rick Scott, Florida governor

* Rich Bagger, former pharmaceutical executive and former top aide to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie

* Bobby Jindal, former Louisiana governor

HOMELAND SECURITY SECRETARY

* Michael McCaul, U.S. representative from Texas and chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee

* David Clarke, Milwaukee county sheriff and vocal Trump supporter

* Joe Arpaio, outgoing Maricopa County, Arizona, sheriff who campaigned for Trump

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ADMINISTRATOR

* Jeff Holmstead, energy lawyer, former EPA official during George W. Bush administration

* Mike Catanzaro, energy lobbyist, former EPA official during George W. Bush administration

* Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors

* Leslie Rutledge, Arkansas attorney general

* Carol Comer, commissioner of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management

ENERGY SECRETARY

* Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, chief executive of Continental Resources Inc

* Kevin Cramer, U.S. Representative from North Dakota

* Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors

* Larry Nichols, co-founder of Devon Energy Corp

* James Connaughton, chief executive of Nautilus Data Technologies and a former environmental adviser to President George W. Bush

INTERIOR SECRETARY

* Sarah Palin, former Alaska governor, 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee

* Jan Brewer, former Arizona governor

* Forrest Lucas, founder of oil products company Lucas Oil

* Harold Hamm, Oklahoma oil and gas mogul, chief executive of Continental Resources Inc

* Robert Grady, venture capitalist, partner in private equity firm Gryphon Investors

COMMERCE SECRETARY

* Wilbur Ross, billionaire investor, chairman of Invesco Ltd subsidiary WL Ross & Co

* Linda McMahon, former World Wrestling Entertainment executive and two-time Senate candidate

DIRECTOR OF NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE

* Ronald Burgess, retired lieutenant general and former Defense Intelligence Agency chief

* Robert Cardillo, director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

* Pete Hoekstra, former U.S. representative from Michigan

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY DIRECTOR

* Republican U.S. Representative Mike Pompeo was announced as the choice on Nov. 18.

NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER

* Michael Flynn, retired lieutenant general and former director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, was announced as the choice on Nov. 18.

UNITED NATIONS AMBASSADOR

* Kelly Ayotte, outgoing U.S. senator from New Hampshire and member of the Senate Armed Services Committee

* Richard Grenell, former spokesman for the United States at the United Nations

* Peter King, U.S. representative from New York

U.S. TRADE REPRESENTATIVE

* Dan DiMicco, former chief executive of steel producer Nucor Corp

SUPREME COURT VACANCY

The Trump transition team confirmed he would choose from the list of 21 names he drew up during his campaign, including U.S. Senator Mike Lee of Utah, and William Pryor, a federal judge with the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

LABOR SECRETARY

* Victoria Lipnic, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission commissioner and former Labor Department official during the George W. Bush administration.

* Andrew Puzder, CEO of CKE Restaurants.

(Reporting by Caren Bohan; Editing by Paul Tait and Andrew Hay)

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