Australian zoo celebrates arrival of echidna puggles

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Taronga Zoo in Sydney, Australia released footage of their new baby echidnas on Friday, November 18th.

The trio of puggles were born between August 16 and August 30, 2016, and were the first echidna births at the zoo in 29 years.

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Interacting with echidnas
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Interacting with echidnas

Prince Harry holds Echidna 'Spike' at the beginning of his sabatical in front of Sydney harbor during the Prince Harry Photo opportunity at the Taronga Zoo September 23, 2003 in Sydney, Australia. Prince Harry arrived in Sydney today as part of his 4 month sabatical in Australia.

(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

Bo, a 55-day-old baby Echidna known as a puggle, rests in the hands of vet nurse Annabelle Sehlmeier at Taronga Zoo in Sydney November 1, 2012. The puggle was bought to the zoo after it being found by itself on a walking track north of Sydney and will be fed by hand until it is weaned at about six months of age.

(REUTERS/Tim Wimborne)

An echidna eats its food during a National Threatened Species Day event, held in central Sydney September 7, 2012. The National Threatened Species Day is an event organized by the Zoo and Aquarium Association to educate local communities about the importance of threatened species and what people can do to help them, according to the organizers.

(REUTERS/Daniel Munoz)

US Vice-President Joe Biden with his three grandchildren visit Taronga Zoo and are introduced to a echidna on July 19, 2016 in Sydney, Australia. Biden is visiting Australia on a four day trip which includes a visit to Melbourne at the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre to promote US-Australia cancer research and will host a round-table discussion with business leaders in Sydney.

(Photo by Jessica Hromas/Getty Images)

A curious Echidna climbs on one of the photographer's camera during a visit to Sydney's Taronga Zoo, Australia, Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2003. The Echidna is a member of the monotreme family which are mammals that lay eggs and produce milk for their young.

(AP Photo/Dan Peled)

Britain's Prince William and his wife Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, pat two echidnas after watching a bird and Australian native animal show during a visit to Taronga Zoo in Sydney on April 20, 2014. William, his wife Kate and their son Prince George are on a three-week tour of New Zealand and Australia.

(WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)

Bo, a 55-day-old baby Echidna known as a puggle, rests in the hands of vet nurse Annabelle Sehlmeier at Taronga Zoo in Sydney November 1, 2012. The puggle was bought to the zoo after it being found by itself on a walking track north of Sydney and will be fed by hand until it is weaned at about six months of age.

(REUTERS/Tim Wimborne)

Alexander Skarsgard greets an echidna during the Legend of Tarzan Photo Call at WILD LIFE Sydney Zoo on June 14, 2016 in Sydney, Australia.

(Photo by Don Arnold/WireImage)

Bo, a 55-day-old baby Echidna known as a puggle, rests in the hands of vet nurse Annabelle Sehlmeier at Taronga Zoo in Sydney November 1, 2012. The puggle was bought to the zoo after it being found by itself on a walking track north of Sydney and will be fed by hand until it is weaned at about six months of age.

(REUTERS/Tim Wimborne)

Prince Harry reacts as he holds 'Spike' the echidna, at Sydney's Taronga Zoo, 23 September 2003. Harry, Prince Charles second son and third in line to the British throne, arrived in Australia 23 September for a three-month stay during his gap year before military college, planning to work during his trip as a jackaroo at cattle and sheep stations.

(GREG WOOD/AFP/Getty Images)

"Cess" short-beaked echidna is held by keeper Gemma Watkinson at the Wildlife Clinic center at Taronga Zoo in Sydney, Australia, Tuesday, July 25, 2006. Cess suffered a broken foot and severe cuts to her nose that required expert veterinary surgery at Taronga Zoo Wildlife Clinic after a road accident.

(AP Photo/Mark Baker)

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According to a press release published by the zoo, echidnas are difficult to breed in captivity.

''Echidnas are quite elusive in the wild, so it's hard to study their natural breeding behaviors," said zookeeper Suzi Lemon.

"All three mothers are doing an amazing job and tending to their puggles as needed," she added.

The three baby echidnas, which are yet to be named, will explore the world beyond their burrows in the beginning of 2017.

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