Where Trump could make major policy shifts — even without Congress

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Donald Trump could reverse Obama administration policies on immigration, pay and benefits for some federal workers and Cuba as soon as he enters the Oval Office.

On policing and health care, Trump's team can easily suspend some of Obama's policies, in effect killing off large swathes of what the president has achieved in office.

See more on Donald Trump's administration:

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Donald Trump's transition team
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Donald Trump's transition team
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and Chairman of the Republican National Committee Reince Priebus address supporters during his election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence attends a campaign rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S. November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Campaign CEO Stephen Bannon departs the offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Governor Chris Christie speaks to supporters in West Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. January 31, 2016. REUTERS/Brian C. Frank/File Photo
Former candidate Ben Carson arrives to attend the third and final 2016 presidential campaign debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton at UNLV in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 19, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani leaves the offices of Republican President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S., November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
Defense Intelligence Agency director U.S. Army Lt. General Michael Flynn testifies before the House Intelligence Committee on "Worldwide Threats" in Washington February 4, 2014. REUTERS/Gary Cameron/File photo TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions (R-Al) speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican President-elect Donald Trump's daughter Ivanka Trump arrives at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S., November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Son of Republican President-elect Donald Trump Eric Trump gives the thumbs up as he arrives at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S., November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Donald Trump Jr. sits between his wife Vanessa (L) and his brother Eric Trump (R) during the third and final debate between Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton at UNLV in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 19, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Jared Kushner (L) and Stephen Bannon stand by as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a campaign rally in Canton, Ohio, U.S., September 14, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
PayPal co-founder and Facebook board member Peter Thiel delivers his speech on the U.S. presidential election at the National Press Club in Washington, U.S., October 31, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
Steven Mnuchin, Chairman and Co-CEO of Dune Capital Management LP and Chairman and CEO of OneWest Bank Group LLC speaks at a panel discussion "Jump-Starting the Housing Market" at the 2009 Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills,California April 28, 2009. REUTERS/Fred Prouser (UNITED STATES BUSINESS)
Anthony Scaramucci, co-managing partner and founder of Skybridge Capital speaks at the opening of the annual Skybridge Alternatives Conference (SALT) in Las Vegas May 6, 2015. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Newly elected Congressmen Lou Barletta (R-PA) (R) and Tim Scott (R-SC) (C) arrive on Capitol Hill in Washington, November 17, 2010. The new members of the upcoming 112th Congress are going through orientation. REUTERS/Jim Young (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Representative Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 21, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. Representative Chris Collins (R-NY) flashes a thumbs-up before delivering his nomination speech at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
U.S. Representative Devin Nunes (R-CA) talks to reporters as he walks from the offices of House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) (not pictured) at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, October 15, 2013. Republicans in the House of Representatives failed to reach internal consensus on Tuesday on how to break an impasse on the federal budget that could soon result in an economically damaging default on the country's debt. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS MEDIA)
Campaign Communications Director Hope Hicks departs the offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
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But the president-elect can't eliminate one of Obama's signature domestic policy achievements — the Affordable Care Act — without Congress.

It is a complicated process for Trump to stop Obama-backed agreements to reduce climate change and limit Iran's nuclear weapons program, because those are international deals that involve other nations deeply invested in them.

Related: Obama Races to Protect His Achievements From Trump

"The United States, the most powerful economy in the world, the second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, must respect the commitments that were made," French President Francois Hollande said Tuesday, according to the Associated Press, in remarks aimed at Trump and the U.S.: "It's not simply their duty, it's in their interest."

See more on Donald Trump:

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President Obama meets with Trump
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President Obama meets with Trump
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) greets President-elect Donald Trump in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Obama and Trump discussed a range of domestic and foreign policy topics at the White House during their first meeting since Trump's stunning election victory.
U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with President-elect Donald Trump (L) to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) greets President-elect Donald Trump in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with President-elect Donald Trump (L) to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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Here's what Trump can and can't do on his own once in the Oval Office.

National Security and Foreign Policy

What Trump can do alone

Obama signed an executive order in 2009 banning so-called black sites — the secret detention facilities that were run by the CIA during the Bush administration. Then in 2013 Obama issued policy guidance limiting U.S. drone strikes unless there was "near certainty" that civilians would not be harmed.

Without any congressional authorization, Obama also took a number of steps to normalize relations with Cuba, including allowing U.S. airlines to run direct flights there.

All of these are presidential orders that Trump could reverse immediately if he chose.

Congress has allowed Obama to wage war with ISIS with little formal authorization from the legislative branch, which according to the U.S. Constitution is supposed to be the authority that declares war. Trump has said repeatedly he will bomb ISIS strongholds more aggressively than the Obama administration, although he has not given details of strategy.

See more on the Trump family:

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Members of the Trump family
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Members of the Trump family
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 26: Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner are seen on March 26, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Tal Rubin/GC Images)
BRIARCLIFF MANOR, NY - SEPTEMBER 21: Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump attends the 9th Annual Eric Trump Foundation golf invitational at Trump National Golf Club Westchester on September 21, 2015 in Briarcliff Manor City. (Photo by Bobby Bank/WireImage)
BRIARCLIFF MANOR, NY - SEPTEMBER 21: (L-R) Vanessa Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Ivana Trump, Eric Trump, Lara Trump, Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner attend the 9th Annual Eric Trump Foundation Golf Invitational Auction & Dinner at Trump National Golf Club Westchester on September 21, 2015 in Briarcliff Manor, New York. (Photo by Grant Lamos IV/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 04: Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump attend the 'China: Through The Looking Glass' Costume Institute Benefit Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 4, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 16: (L-R) Eric Trump, Lara Yunaska Trump, Donald Trump, Barron Trump, Melania Trump, Vanessa Haydon Trump, Kai Madison Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Donald John Trump III, Ivanka Trump, Jared Kushner, and Tiffany Trump pose for photos on stage after Donald Trump announced his candidacy for the U.S. presidency at Trump Tower on June 16, 2015 in New York City. Trump is the 12th Republican who has announced running for the White House. (Photo by Christopher Gregory/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 07: Jared Kushner (L) and Ivanka Trump attend the American Theatre Wing's 69th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 7, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images)
BEDMINSTER, NJ - OCTOBER, 25: In this handout image provided by Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, Ivanka Trump (R) and Jared Kushner (L) attend their wedding at Trump National Golf Club on October 25, 2009 in Bedminster, New Jersey. (Photo Brian Marcus/Fred Marcus Photography via Getty Images)
Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, center, speaks as his sons Donald Trump Jr., left, and Eric Trump, right, listen during a caucus night rally in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016. Trump's dominating victory in the Nevada caucuses pushes him further out ahead of his nearest competitors for the Republican presidential nomination, giving his unorthodox candidacy a major boost heading into Super Tuesday contests next week. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
20/20 - Donald Trump and his family - including wife Melania Trump and his children - sit down for an interview with ABC News' Barbara Walters in a special edition of 20/20 airing Friday, Nov. 20 (10-11pm, ET) on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Lorenzo Bevilaqua/ABC via Getty Images) DONALD TRUMP, JR., IVANKA TRUMP, ERIC TRUMP, TIFFANY TRUMP, BARBARA WALTERS
LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 28: Marla Maples (L) and Tiffany Trump have dinner at Sumosan on July 28, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Getty Images)
BRIARCLIFF MANOR, NY - SEPTEMBER 15: (EDITORS NOTE: Retransmission of #455504994 with alternate crop.) (L-R) Donald Trump, Ivana Trump, Eric Trump and Lara Yunaska attend The Eric Trump 8th Annual Golf Tournament at Trump National Golf Club Westchester on September 15, 2014 in Briarcliff Manor, New York. (Photo by Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 18: Donald Trump, Eric Trump and Lara Yunaska attend the New York Observer's 2013 Young Philanthropy event at PH-D Rooftop Lounge at Dream Downtown on April 18, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Laura Cavanaugh/Getty Images)
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Whatever his policy, Trump is likely to have largely unchecked authority in anti-ISIS efforts, based on the precedent of the last two years set by Obama.

Related: How Trump Can Gut Obama's National Security Policies on Day One

Where Trump faces limits

While Trump can limit U.S. involvement in international agreements, it has already been agreed with Iran and five other nations that international sanctions on Iran were lifted, in exchange for the country agreeing to closer inspections of their nuclear weapons facilities. The agreement would not end simply because the United States is not involved.

Similarly, the so-called Paris agreement between more than 100 nations, including the United States, to ensure the planet warms no more than 2°C, is unlikely to end simply because the U.S. withdraws. But Trump could unilaterally end U.S. involvement.

Trump has suggested that U.S military personnel should use whatever techniques are necessary to fight terrorism. But Congress approved and Obama signed a bill in 2015 that is intended to ban so-called enhanced interrogation techniques, such as waterboarding.

Immigration and the Border

What Trump Can Do On His Own

Trump has suggested he wants to deport as many as three million undocumented immigrants. Presidents generally have wide authority in setting priorities for deportation. Similarly, presidents generally have the power to determine how many refugees the U.S. accepts and from where — although a specific ban on Muslim refugees could be challenged in court.

See more on reactions to the election:

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Trump name taken down from NYC buildings
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Trump name taken down from NYC buildings
Workers remove signage on the Trump Place apartment buildings on Manhattan's Upper West Side in New York City, U.S., November 16, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Workers remove signage on the Trump Place apartment buildings on Manhattan's Upper West Side in New York City, U.S., November 16, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Workers remove signage on the Trump Place apartment buildings on Manhattan's Upper West Side in New York City, U.S., November 16, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
TOPSHOT - Letters lie on the sidewalk after workers removed Trump signage from 160 Riverside Blvd. on Manhattan's upper west side, Wednesday, November 16, 2016. President-elect Donald Trump's name will be taken off the three luxury buildings at Trump Place after tenants signed a petition saying they did not want their home associated with the president-elect. / AFP / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers remove Trump signage from 180 Riverside Blvd. on Manhattan's upper west side November 16, 2016 in New York. President-elect Donald Trump's name will be taken off the three luxury buildings at Trump Place after tenants signed a petition saying they did not want their home associated with the president-elect. / AFP / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
The facade of a building after workers remove Trump the signage on Manhattan's upper west sideNovember 16, 2016 in New York. President-elect Donald Trump's name will be taken off the three luxury buildings at Trump Place after tenants signed a petition saying they did not want their home associated with the president-elect. / AFP / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
Trump signage at 180 Riverside Blvd. on Manhattan's upper west side November 16, 2016 in New York. President-elect Donald Trump's name will be taken off the three luxury buildings at Trump Place after tenants signed a petition saying they did not want their home associated with the president-elect. / AFP / Bryan R. Smith (Photo credit should read BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)
A man removes letters from the awning of a building formerly known as Trump Place in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. Donald Trump's name is being stripped off three luxury apartment buildings after hundreds of tenants signed a petition saying they were embarrassed to live in a place associated with the Republican president-elect. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A man removes letters from the awning of a building formerly known as Trump Place in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. Donald Trump's name is being stripped off three luxury apartment buildings after hundreds of tenants signed a petition saying they were embarrassed to live in a place associated with the Republican president-elect. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A man scrubs off the impressions of letters on a building formerly known as Trump Place in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. Donald Trump's name is being stripped off three luxury apartment buildings after hundreds of tenants signed a petition saying they were embarrassed to live in a place associated with the Republican president-elect. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A man uses a power washer to remove the impressions of letters on a building formerly known as Trump Place in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. Donald Trump's name is being stripped off three luxury apartment buildings after hundreds of tenants signed a petition saying they were embarrassed to live in a place associated with the Republican president-elect. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Workers remove signage on the Trump Place apartment buildings on Manhattan's Upper West Side in New York City, U.S., November 16, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
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Trump could also act unilaterally to end Obama's policy of stopping deportations of young people referred to as Dreamers. And if Trump suspended the DACA(Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program, it does not mean that the beneficiaries will be deported, but rather they would lose specific protection from deportation.

"Dreamers would at best thrown back into the shadows. At worst they will be deported," said Frank Sharry, executive director of the pro-immigration advocacy group America's Voice. "If that happens immediately, culturally American young people are about to have their lives upended."

Related: Donald Trump's Deportation Plan Must Still Overcome These Roadblocks

Where He Faces Limits

The deportation force and the border wall Trump campaigned on would likely require congressional funding.

Related: Donald Trump's Deportation Plan Must Still Overcome These Roadblocks

Gun Control

What Trump Can Do on His Own

Earlier this year, Obama announced a series of executive actions on gun control, ones that he and his aides acknowledged were small-bore measures. The most important of these provisions was one that expanded the definition of who is a gun dealer and therefore who must conduct background checks on potential buyers — an attempt to regulate more tightly the growing number of gun sales over the Internet.

See Politico's list of people rumored to be considered for Trump's cabinet:

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Donald Trump's rumored picks for his administration
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Donald Trump's rumored picks for his administration
Sarah Palin is rumored to be among Trump's picks for Interior Secretary. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump named Jeff Sessions his pick for U.S. attorney general. (MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump named Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn his pick for National Security Adviser. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Trump named Rep. Mike Pompeo, R-Kan., as his preferred pick for CIA director. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Newt Gingrich is rumored to be among Trump's top picks for secretary of state. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Mitt Romney has reportedly been in discussions for secretary of state. 

(Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)

Ted Cruz was believed to be under consideration for Trump's attorney general

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Steven Mnuchin is rumored to be Trump's top pick for Treasury Secretary. (KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
 

Bob Corker is also rumored to be among Trump's picks for secretary of state. REUTERS/Mike Theiler

Stephen Hadley is rumored to be in the running for secretary of defense. REUTERS/Larry Downing

Jim Talent is rumored to also be in the running for secretary of defense. REUTERS/Tim Parker 

Rudy Giuliani was also rumored to be among Trump's top picks for attorney general. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Forrest Lucas is rumored to be Trump's top pick for Interior Secretary. ( Amanda Edwards/WireImage)

Robert Grady is also being eyed for the Interior Secretary position.  REUTERS/Fred Prouser 

Donald Trump Jr. is also said to have interest in the Interior Secretary position. (REUTERS/Mike Segar)

Controversial pick Sid Miller is one of the many being considered for Agriculture Secretary. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

Sam Brownback is also one of the several names being considered for Agriculture Secretary. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Billionaire Wilbur Ross is a rumored choice for Commerce Secretary. FINANCE-WLROSS/ REUTERS/Tim Chong 

Daniel Dimicco, a Trump Trade Advisor is also on the possible list for Commerce Secretary.  REUTERS/Chris Keane 

Victoria Lipnic (left) is being considered for Labor Secretary.(AP Photo/Wade Payne)

Rick Scott is considered to be a top contender for Health and Human Services Secretary.  REUTERS/Joe Skipper/File Photo

Ben Carson was also rumored to be in the running for Health and Human Services Secretary -- but said he doesn't want the job. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Harold Hamm is considered to be the top contender for Energy Secretary.  (AP PhotoKevin Cederstrom)

Jeff Miller's name has been bounced around many times for the Veterans Affairs Secretary position. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

David Clarke is rumored to be among Trump's top picks for Homeland Security Secretary. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Myron Bell who has been a part of Trump's transition team is rumored to be the top pick for Environmental Protection Agency Administrator position. 

Photo Credit: Twitter/oliverwasow

Representative Tom Price of Georgia is being considered for the position of secretary of health and human services.

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Ivana Trump, the president-elect's ex-wife, has said she wants Trump to name her as ambassador to the Czech Republic.

(Photo by Michael Zorn/Invision/AP)

John Bolton is yet another rumored pick for secretary of state. 

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

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Trump could rescind this policy on his first day in office.

The Economy

What Trump Can Do On His Own

Obama used executive actions to require federal contractors to pay at least $10.10 per hour, offer seven days per year of paid leave to workers and require businesses to offer overtime pay for salaried employees who make less than $48,000 a year. Trump can unilaterally stop these moves.

Trump's appointees at the Securities and Exchange Commission and The Consumer Finance Protection Bureau could severely weaken enforcement of key planks of the Dodd-Frank law even if it is not repealed.

Where He Faces Limits

Reversing Obama's tax hikes on the wealthy — rates increased from 35 to 39.6 percent for individuals with incomes over $400,000 a year and capital gains and estate taxes — requires Congress, as do Trump's plans for major tax cuts on both individuals and corporations.

Criminal Justice

What Trump Could Do On His Own

Obama's Justice Department this summer announced a requirement that federal agents and prosecutors must undergo implicit bias training, a move aimed at reducing racial discrimination that some argue leads to the shooting of African-Americans in particular by police officers.

An attorney general tapped by Trump could eliminate that requirement.

Where He Faces Limits

Trump suggested that he would he look to institute nationwide stop-and-frisk policing practices. Most policing in America is done at the local level, so it's not clear Trump could do more than encourage police departments to adopt this approach. Expanded stop and frisk would almost certainly be challenged in court because civil rights experts say it is unconstitutional.

See more on post-election reactions:

28 PHOTOS
Protesters, politicians and fans converge on Trump Tower
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Protesters, politicians and fans converge on Trump Tower
Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) departs Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Vice president-elect Mike Pence departs Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Retired Lieutenant General Keith Kellogg speaks to the media in the lobby of Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Steven Mnuchin, national finance chairman for Republican president-elect Donald Trump, arrives at Trump Tower in New York, U.S. November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A worker yawns as the elevator doors close in the lobby of Republican president-elect Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Sons Eric Trump (L) and Donald Trump Jr go down escalators outside offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Communications adviser Jason Miller arrives at the offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) arrives in the lobby of Republican president-elect Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A woman watches U.S. President Barack Obama on a TV in Trump Bar in the lobby of Republican president-elect Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Women wearing Make America Great Again hats sit at a table at Trump Bar at the offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Campaign manager Kellyanne Conway arrives at the offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Campaign CEO Stephen Bannon departs the offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. on November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri/File Photo
A cardboard sign is seen posted across from Trump Tower in New York U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Republican President-elect Donald Trump's daughter Ivanka Trump arrives at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S., November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Filmmaker Michael Moore leaves a note for the Republican president-elect Donald Trump as he visits Trump Tower in New York, U.S. November 12, 2016. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
Workers joke inside Republican president-elect Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, U.S. November 13, 2016. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
Nigel Farage, leader of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP), arrives at Republican president-elect Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, U.S. November 12, 2016. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
Campaign Communications Director Hope Hicks departs the offices of Republican president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani leaves the offices of Republican President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S., November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
NYPD officers pose for pictures inside Republican president-elect Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, U.S. November 13, 2016. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
Secret Service agents ride down an escalator at Trump Tower after the election selected Republican president-elect Donald Trump in New York, New York, U.S. November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A supporter of Republican president-elect Donald Trump visits Trump Tower in New York, U.S. November 13, 2016. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
Son of Republican President-elect Donald Trump Eric Trump arrives at Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S., November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A U.S. secret service agent looks on, inside Republican president-elect Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, U.S. November 13, 2016. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
A doorman stands outside an elevator in the lobby of Republican president-elect Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, New York, U.S. November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. secret service agents patrols inside Republican president-elect Donald Trump's Trump Tower in New York, U.S. November 12, 2016. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
New York Police Department (NYPD) officers stand guard outside Trump Tower during a protest against president-elect Donald Trump in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Bria Webb
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Related: How Trump Could Erase Key Parts of Obama's Legacy

Obamacare

What Trump Could Do On His Own

Obama has been encouraging Americans to enroll in health insurance through the Affordable Care Act and encouraging states to expand their Medicaid programs as part of the law. Trump's team could discontinue that outreach, which would likely result in fewer people enrolling in Obamacare.

Where He Faces Limits

Major changes to Obamacare, such as ending its mandate that Americans buy health insurance, require congressional approval.

Related: Repeal Obamacare? Maybe Not, Says Trump

Other Issues

Courts have blocked Obama administration initiatives to ensure that transgender students can use the bathroom of the gender they identify as, impose strict limits on emissions from power plants and grant protection from deportation to about five million undocumented immigrants.

Trump is very unlikely to revive these policies.

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