'It was arrogance' — Clinton staffers explain how she lost key battleground states

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Hillary Clinton's campaign ignored pleas from staff members for the candidate to boost her efforts in Michigan and Wisconsin, two unexpected battleground states, the Huffington Post reported Wednesday.

The two states, considered safely Democratic by virtually all pollsters ahead of the election, swung for Donald Trump on Election Day, securing the Republican his shocking victory.

SEE ALSO: How Donald Trump blew up the electoral map

In Michigan, which Clinton is on track to lose by about 12,000 votes, one senior operative said her campaign's canvassing operation was one-tenth the size of Democratic candidate John Kerry's in 2004.

According to one organizer, the campaign sent canvassers to a trailer park in Flint, unaware that the park had burned down, the Huffington Post reported.

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Hillary Clinton at Children's Defense Fund Gala
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Hillary Clinton at Children's Defense Fund Gala

Hillary Clinton addresses the Children's Defense Fund's Beat the Odds celebration at the Newseum in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016.

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Hillary Clinton hugs Marian Wright Edelman, president and founder of the, Children's Defense Fund, before addressing the group's Beat the Odds celebration at the Newseum in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016.

(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Hillary Clinton walks from the stage after speaking to the Childrenâs Defense Fund in Washington, U.S., November 16, 2016.

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Hillary Clinton pauses as she speaks at the Children's Defense Fund Beat the Odds Celebration at the Newseum in Washington on November 16, 2016.

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton receives a standing ovation while being honored during the Children's Defense Fund's Beat the Odds Celebration at the Newseum November 16, 2016 in Washington, DC. This was the first time Clinton had spoken in public since conceeding the presidential race to Republican Donald Trump.

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Hillary Clinton is seen thru two chairs as she addresses the Children's Defense Fund's Beat the Odds celebration at the Newseum in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016.

(AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Former Secretary of State and former Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton delivers remarks while being honored during the Children's Defense Fund's Beat the Odds Celebration at the Newseum November 16, 2016 in Washington, DC. This was the first time Clinton had spoken in public since conceeding the presidential race to Republican Donald Trump.

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Hillary Clinton and Marian Wright Edelman, founder of the Children's Defense Fund, wave before Clinton speaks to the group in Washington, U.S., November 16, 2016.

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Hillary Clinton arrives at the Children's Defense Fund Beat the Odds Celebration at the Newseum in Washington on November 16, 2016.

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Hillary Clinton speaks to the Childrenâs Defense Fund in Washington, U.S., November 16, 2016.

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Hillary Clinton is seen through a teleprompter as she speaks at the Children's Defense Fund Beat the Odds Celebration at the Newseum in Washington on November 16, 2016.

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"It was arrogance, arrogance that they were going to win. That this was all wrapped up," a senior operative told the publication.

Meanwhile, in Wisconsin, local campaign officials were forced to raise $1 million in last-minute get-out-the-vote funds after Clinton's national campaign declined to provide it, operatives told the Post.

Clinton's Wisconsin office also reportedly lobbied for the campaign to send African-American surrogates to boost Democratic turnout in Milwaukee. Clinton received 39,000 fewer votes in Milwaukee County than Barack Obama did in 2012, and she lost the state by about 27,000 votes, thanks to lower turnout in three key counties.

"There are only so many times you can get folks excited about Chelsea Clinton," a Wisconsin Democrat told the Huffington Post.

RELATED: See upset Clinton supporters on election night

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Clinton supporters are fleeing her election night party in tears
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Clinton supporters are fleeing her election night party in tears

A supporter of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton watches and waits at her election night rally in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016.

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A Clinton supporter stands alone in the bleachers after Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally was canceled at the Jacob Javits Center in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.

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Supporters of U.S Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton react as a state is called in favour of her opponent, Republican candidate Donald Trump, during a watch party for the U.S. Presidential election, at the University of Sydney in Australia, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Reed

A supporter of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton watches and waits at her election night rally in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Musician Lagy Gaga sits in her car after staging a protest against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump outside Trump Tower in New York City after midnight on election day November 9, 2016. Donald Trump stunned America and the world, riding a wave of populist resentment to defeat Hillary Clinton in the race to become the 45th president of the United States. The Republican mogul defeated his Democratic rival, plunging global markets into turmoil and casting the long-standing global political order, which hinges on Washington's leadership, into doubt.

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Guests react to election results as they appear on a large television monitor during Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.

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A supporter uses his smartphone as others leave Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

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Supporters of Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton react at the election night rally in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

A person talks on the phone at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 9, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States.

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Emily Benn stays in a seat at the end of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally at the Jacob Javits Center in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.

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At attendee reacts while kneeling on the floor during an election night party for 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton at the Javits Center in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. 

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An attendee reacts while sitting on the floor during an election night party for 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton at the Javits Center in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.

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Matt Sanborn of Laconia, N.H., a Boston College student who volunteered for Democratic candidates including Hillary Clinton and New Hampshire Democratic Senate candidate, Gov. Maggie Hassan, rests his hands on the top of his head while watching election returns during an election night rally in Manchester, N.H., Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.

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A woman weeps as election results are reported during Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.

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Wellesley College students and supporters of Hillary Clinton Kumari Devarajan, of Washington, left, and Diana Castillo, of Elgin, Ill,, right, wipe away tears as they watch televised election returns during a watch party on the campus of Wellesley College, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in Wellesley, Mass. Clinton graduated from Wellesley College in 1969.

(AP Photo/Steven Senne)

A supporter of U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton reacts at her election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A supporter of U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton reacts at her election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
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Trump, for his part, ramped up his efforts in Michigan in the final weeks of the campaign, making multiple stops there, including his final campaign appearance that stretched into the early morning of Election Day.

An average of pre-election polls showed Clinton with a 3.4-point lead in Michigan and a 6.5-point lead in Wisconsin. The two states are worth a combined 26 electoral votes — still not enough for Clinton to reach the 270 threshold. She also lost Pennsylvania, which hadn't swung Republican in a presidential race since 1988.

Clinton's campaign has pinned the loss on FBI Director James Comey, who announced 11 days before the election that the bureau was reactivating its investigation into Clinton's use of a private email server. The announcement likely helped depress voter turnout, a campaign director wrote in an email last week.

Comey's subsequent letter clearing Clinton of any wrongdoing, issued two days before the election, may have energized Trump's supporters in turn, the director said.

Read the Huffington Post report here.

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