These are the top 5 travel destinations for millennials in 2017

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By Sean Dowling, Buzz60

When it comes to traveling millennials, something that matters most is the social aspect, according to new research.

They invented the expression "do it for the gram," after all.

That's why results from the "No Regrets Travel List" by youth travel operator Contiki make sense when you look at the top 5 travel experiences for 18-35 year olds in 2017.

Contiki's survey polled over 5,000 young people around the world to see where they'd like to go and why.

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Difficult countries for Americans to travel to
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Difficult countries for Americans to travel to

Bhutan

The Asian kingdom opened its borders to foreign tourism in 1974, but in order to keep traffic down they have a 'High Value. Low Impact' policy. All U.S. tourists must obtain a visa and book their holiday through a Bhutanese tour operator. Visitors must have $200-250 per day to visit, which includes a tour guide, meals, accommodations and gear.

It is also tricky to physically get to Bhutan. Only two carriers fly into the country, Drukair and Bhutan Airlines, and you must connect from another Asian country like Thailand, India or Singapore.

Photo: Getty

Belarus

Belarus makes it difficult to Americans to visit. You need a letter of invitation from a company or organization in Belarus. You need to fill out an application that needs approval. The payment to enter Belarus was reduced in 2015, but it is still $70 for single entry. This is down from a whopping $160. These daunting requirements make the former Soviet state one of least visited places in Europe.

Russia

Russia also has a laundry list of requirements that turn off American travelers. You must list all areas in Russia that you intend to visit on your visa application and carry your passport and migration card with you at all times.

You must have a Russia-based sponsor, such as a tour group or hotel, in order to get a visa. The Russian visa application is notorious for its long list of questions, including a list all the countries you have visited in the last 10 years. The visa will also cost you $198.

Photo: Getty

North Korea

It goes without saying that the Kermit kingdom is difficult for Americans to visit. The United States is a focus of hateful propaganda and tourists are at risk of long-term detention and imprisonment. Americans can legally travel to North Korea, but the State Department strongly urges U.S. citizens to avoid all travel to North Korea. However, if you must go, there are tour groups that leave out of China.

Photo: Getty

Turkmenistan

Despite sporting an eccentric dictator who draws comparisons to Kim Jong Un, this country is lesser known to Americans.

Travel to the country is not forbidden, but you need a letter of invitation certified by the government of Turkmenistan and a tourist visa that you need to schedule an interview for.

Very few tourists visit the nation, perhaps because they are turned off by the fact that they are required to have a guide, which can be costly. There are also no travel zones, mainly the border areas next to Iran, Uzbekistan and Afghanistan.

Saudi Arabia

Not only does State Department urge caution when traveling to Saudi Arabia due to high terrorism risk from ISIS right now, but women and children must be accompanied by a male family member. U.S. citizens need to fill out a visa application that costs $110.

The country has been known to deny visas to non-Muslim applicants, and holders of passports with Israeli stamps or travelers with an Israeli birthplace have been refused entry.

Saudi Arabia is not the only country known to give tourists with Israeli stamps a hard time, so Israel changed their policy to give tourists an entry card instead.

Sudan

There is a high-risk of terrorism, armed conflict, violent crime and kidnapping if you are an American. Even family members of U.S. embassy personnel are not allowed to reside in Sudan if they are under 21. Similar to Saudi Arabia, the authorities may refuse entry to holders of passports that contain visas for Israel.

Photo: Getty

Marshall Islands

This beautiful little island country is not stricken by war or run by a dictator, but it is really, really hard to get to. There is only one direct flight from the United States that leaves from Hawaii, and it is going to cost at least $1,600.

Photo: Getty

China

The Chinese government will make you jump through hoops to get a visa. You have to submit your application to a Chinese embassy or consulate based on your state and then pick it up. There are only six locations that serve the entire United States. They do not accept mail-in visa applications, so you'd need to find a friend or visa service to drop it off and pick it up if you are far from a spot.

Luckily, the government has a rule that allows visitors without visas to stay within mainland China for 72 hours.

Photo: Getty

Tuvalu

Only about 1,600 tourists visit Tuvalu each year and hardly any from the United States. Only 12 consulates in the world offer tourist visas to this tiny country, home to less than 9,000 people, making it the world's second smallest country. There is also only one flight that services it.

Photo: Getty

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Topping the list was bathing in the Blue Lagoon in Iceland.

Don't worry about taking a bath with 50 other people all at once.

Because of the minerals and heat, the water is self-cleansing.

Besides, everyone will be too busy getting the right shot and mingling given that 74% of respondents said social experiences were the most valuable; ahead of cultural, culinary and spiritual experiences.

Seeing the Great Pyramids of Giza comes in second.

You can get learn about culture, have a spiritual experience or take a bunch of fun pictures!

Walking the Great Wall of China comes in third.

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Don't look down: Scariest travel destinations
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Don't look down: Scariest travel destinations

Chamonix in the French Alps.

The Chamonix Skywalk is a five-sided glass structure installed on the top terrace of the Aiguille du Midi (3842m), with a 1,000 metre drop below, where visitors can step out from the terrace, giving the visitors the impression of standing in the void.

(REUTERS/Robert Pratta (FRANCE)

The Burj Kahlifa, the world's tallest building in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Situated in downtown Dubai, the building was completed in October 2009. The building stands 829.8 metres tall, 2,722 feet. Visitors to Dubai can visit the buidling, with an observation deck on the 124th floor, named 'At the Top'. The views from the deck are stunning and give an amazing view of the surrounds of Dubai. The lift taking visitors to the deck hurtles guests at top speed and then allows them space outside to view the surrounds. There are 24,348 windows in the building. The building dominates for miles around and is truly a spectacular building of our day.

Zhangjiajie, China

Picture shows the glass-bottomed bridge across the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon on June 12, 2016 in Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province of China. The bridge stretched 430 meters long, 6 meters wide and the biggest vertical drop was 1,430 meters under the path. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

Skywalk at the Grand Canyon on the Hualapai Indian Reservation at Grand Canyon West, Ariz.

(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Willis Tower, Chicago.

The observation deck of the 108-story Willis Tower (formerly named the Sears Tower), January 15, 2014. Over one million people visit its observation deck each year. The 1,451-foot building is home to United Airlines's main office.

(Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)

CN Tower, Toronto.

(AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Darren Calabrese)

Langkawi Sky Bridge, Malaysia.

It's a curved pedestrian bridge built on top of Mt. Machinchang at a height of 700 meters above sea level. The bridge is suspended from a 82 meter pylon swinging out over the landscape to give visitors a unique view of the surrounding area and neighboring islands.

(Photo by John S Lander/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Blackpool, England.

 The observation deck at the top of the tower becomes the Blackpool Tower Eye and features a skywalk made of glass overlooking the sea and the promenade.

(Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Zhangjiajie, China.

Aerial view of tourists walking on the 100-meter-long and 1.6-meter-wide glass skywalk clung the cliff of Tianmen Mountain (or Tianmenshan Mountain) in Zhangjiajie National Forest Park on August 1, 2016 in Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province of China. The Coiling Dragon Cliff skywalk, featuring a total of 99 road turns, layers after another, is the third glass skywalk on the Tianmen Mountain (or Tianmenshan Mountain).

(Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

Auckland's Sky Tower, New Zealand.

Steeplejacks celebrate the completion of electrical and construction work on Auckland's Sky Tower.

Dachstein Mountains, Austria.

People on the 'Stairway to Nothingness' on the Dachstein Mountains.

Lion's Head, Cape Town, South Africa.

Lion's Head is known for spectacular views over both the city and the Atlantic Seaboard, and the hike to the top is particularly popular hike in the city and people hike up during full moon. Its slopes are also a popular launching point for paragliders.

(Photo by Nardus Engelbrecht/Gallo Images/Getty Images)

Via Ferrata, Telluride, Colorado. 

Traversing the Main Event section of the Via Ferrata. 

Capilano River, Vancouver.

The Capilano Suspension Bridge across the Capilano River in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, circa 1960.

(Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images)

Royal Gorge in Colorado Springs.
Devil's pool, Victoria Falls, Zambia.
Stone Stairway, Skellig Michael, Ireland.

El Caminito del Ray, Malaga Spain.

'El Caminito del Rey', which was built in 1905 and winds through the Gaitanes Gorge, reopened last weekend after a safer footpath was installed above the original. The path, known as the most dangerous footpath in the world, was closed after two fatal accidents in 1999 and 2000. The restoration started in 2011 and reportedly cost 5.5 million euros.

(Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)

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Chances are both your legs and arms will be sore, walking miles and snapping pics along the way.

Chilling out on the beach in Australia's Byron Bay comes in fourth.

You need to relax after all of that walking.

Rounding out the top 5 list is learning how to make pizza in Italy.

A culinary experience you can't get back in the states, that's for sure!

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