New Yorkers build walls of sticky notes in defiance of Trump

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Wall of sticky notes in New York subway defies Trump
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Wall of sticky notes in New York subway defies Trump
Messages written on post-it notes decorate a wall that was started in reaction to the election of President-elect Donald Trump in New York, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A woman stops to read and photograph messages written on post-it notes regarding the election of President-elect Donald Trump in New York, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A young girl adds a message written on a post-it note to a display that was started in reaction to the election of President-elect Donald Trump in New York, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A woman adds a message written on a post-it note to a display that was started in reaction to the election of President-elect Donald Trump in New York, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Messages written on post-it notes decorate a wall that was started in reaction to the election of President-elect Donald Trump in New York, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A woman stops to photograph messages written on post-it notes regarding the election of President-elect Donald Trump in New York, U.S., November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Post-election Post-it notes are seen pasted along a tiled walk at Union Square subway station in New York U.S., November 14, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 10: Post-it notes, many with politically themed messages, hang on a wall at the 6th Avenue subway station as part of a public art project entitled 'Subway Therapy,' November 10, 2016 in New York City. Artist Matthew Chavez, who goes by 'Levee,' created the 'Subway Therapy' wall to offer New Yorkers a chance to write down their feelings in the wake of the presidential election. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Subway riders leave post-it notes on the walls of a subway tunnel on November 10, 2016 in New York City. New York commuters are venting anger and frustration over Republican Donald Trump's shock victory by indulging in collective therapy -- writing messages on post-it notes and sticking them on a subway wall. / AFP / Catherine Triomphe (Photo credit should read CATHERINE TRIOMPHE/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 10: People write and hang post-it notes, many with politically themed messages, on a wall at the 6th Avenue subway station as part of a public art project entitled 'Subway Therapy,' November 10, 2016 in New York City. Artist Matthew Chavez, who goes by 'Levee,' created the 'Subway Therapy' wall to offer New Yorkers a chance to write down their feelings in the wake of the presidential election. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 10: A man writes a message on a post-it note as part of a public art project entitled 'Subway Therapy' at the 6th Avenue subway station, November 10, 2016 in New York City. Artist Matthew Chavez, who goes by 'Levee,' created the 'Subway Therapy' wall to offer New Yorkers a chance to write down their feelings in the wake of the presidential election. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Matthew Chavez, who goes by the artist name Levee, talks to children about the messages posted on the "Subway Therapy" wall, Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, in New York. Levee started the installation in the underground passageway that connects the 1 train to the L train on 14th St., where people are encouraged to leave their feelings about the presidential election written on Post-It notes. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
EDS NOTE: VULGAR LANGUAGE - Post-it note are seen on the "Subway Therapy" wall, Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, in New York. Matthew Chavez, who goes by the artist name Levee, started the installation in the underground passageway that connects the 1 train to the L train on 14th St., where people are encouraged to leave their feelings about the presidential election written on Post-It notes. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Post-it note are seen on the "Subway Therapy" wall, Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, in New York. Matthew Chavez, who goes by the artist name Levee, started the installation in the underground passageway that connects the 1 train to the L train on 14th St., where people are encouraged to leave their feelings about the presidential election written on Post-It notes. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
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​​​​​​NEW YORK (Reuters) - This is not the kind of wall Donald Trump was talking about.

In the liberal stronghold of New York City, residents distraught over the incoming Republican administration were finding solace a week after the U.S. presidential election by placing handwritten, anonymous notes on the walls of a busy subway station.

SEE ALSO: Trump softens promise of border wall, says parts could be fence

On Tuesday, many notes offered support to immigrants or mocked Trump's promise to build a wall along the United States-Mexico border and have Mexico pay for it.

"A better wall," read one sticky note.

"This is the wall that love can build," read another.

Titled "Subway Therapy," the installation lining the underground walls beneath Manhattan's Union Square was the idea of artist Matthew "Levee" Chavez.

"The last couple days have been stressful and I wanted to provide people with an opportunity to engage in a small and easy way," he wrote in the magazine Quartz.

Anyone can post a note, and more than 10,000 people have, Chavez wrote on Instagram.

Democrat Hillary Clinton bested Trump 79 percent to 18 percent in New York City.

Writers of the sticky notes took varied approaches. Some pledged political action, saying "Vote in 2018" and "I will do my part to change this!"

A blue sticky note quotes novelist Zadie Smith on the subject of despair, and a pink one quotes Jesus' Sermon on the Mount: "Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth."

New York's Democratic governor, Andrew Cuomo, struck a pro-immigrant message, posting a note with lines from the Emma Lazarus poem that appear on the Statue of Liberty: "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to be free... I lift my lamp beside the golden door."

The defiant stance expressed in the notes is the right message for New Yorkers to send, said waitress Caitlin Cherry, 28, as she paused to look at them.

"I'm happy that people who are visiting can see that not all Americans want this," she said.

In a separate sign of protest, three apartment buildings on Manhattan's Upper West Side are dropping the name Trump Place and will be known by their addresses, the trade publication Real Deal reported, citing an email to tenants from landlord Equity Residential. Some tenants had circulated a petition requesting the change.

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