Democratic Senator Barbara Boxer wants to eliminate the Electoral College

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Outgoing California Sen. Barbara Boxer planned to introduce a bill on Tuesday that would eliminate the Electoral College, following Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's electoral loss to President-elect Donald Trump but near-certain popular vote victory.

The legislation would amend the Constitution, and would need to be ratified by three-fourths of the states within seven years after passage in Congress to be enacted.

RELATED: Somber scenes from the White House after 2016 election

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Somber scenes from the White House post-election

A White House staff member weeps openly as she awaits U.S. President Barack Obama's arrival to speak about the election results in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

White House staff, including Press Secretary Josh Earnest (2nd L), senior advisor Valerie Jarrett (3rd L) and Communication Director Jen Psaki (2nd R), listen as U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement on the election results at the Rose Garden of the White House November 9, 2006 in Washington, DC. Republican presidential nominee has won the election and will become the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

U.S. President Barack Obama, with Vice President Joe Biden at his side, speaks about the election results that saw Donald Trump become President-elect from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Staff, including White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest, right, listen as President Barack Obama speaks about the election results, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

White House staff members applaud in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, after listening to President Barack Obama speak about the election.

(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Staff members listen as U.S. President Barack Obama, not pictured, speaks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. No U.S. president put more on the line than Obama to ensure the election of his chosen successor. Now, Hillary Clinton's failure may serve as a repudiation of much of his two-term legacy.

(Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the election results that saw Donald Trump become President-elect from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

White House staff listen as U.S. President Barack Obama made a statement on the election results in the Rose Garden at the White House November 9, 2016 in Washington, DC. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has won the election and will become the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

White House spokesman Josh Earnest speaks to reporters about the presidential election victory of Republican Donald Trump from the White House in Washington November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Staff members applaud as U.S. President Barack Obama, not pictured, speaks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. No U.S. president put more on the line than Obama to ensure the election of his chosen successor. Now, Hillary Clinton's failure may serve as a repudiation of much of his two-term legacy.

(Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

U.S. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden (L) walk to the Oval Office after Obama spoke about the election results that saw Donald Trump become President-elect from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett (at column) and White House staffers listen as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks after the election of Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential election at the White House in Washington, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

U.S. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden (L) enter the Oval Office after Obama spoke about the election results that saw Donald Trump become President-elect from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

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"In my lifetime, I have seen two elections where the winner of the general election did not win the popular vote," she said in a statement, noting former Vice President Al Gore's electoral loss in 2000. "When all the ballots are counted, Hillary Clinton will have won the popular vote by a margin that could exceed two million votes, and she is on track to have received more votes than any other presidential candidate in history except Barack Obama."

"This is the only office in the land where you can get more votes and still lose the presidency," she continued. "The Electoral College is an outdated, undemocratic system that does not reflect our modern society, and it needs to change immediately. Every American should be guaranteed that their vote counts."

As of Tuesday, Clinton led Trump by roughly 900,000 votes, with some votes in Democratic strongholds still outstanding. Prior to Clinton and Gore, just three times in presidential history had a nominee lost while winning the popular vote. Grover Cleveland in 1888, Samuel Tilden in 1876, and Andrew Jackson in 1824 are the only other three to lose the presidency in that fashion.

With Michigan yet to be called for either candidate, Trump leads Clinton 290-to-232 in the Electoral College.

While he praised the Electoral College following his win, saying it puts more states into play, he tweeted in 2012 following Republican nominee Mitt Romney's loss, that the system was a "disaster for democracy."

Boxer said she agreed with that sentiment in her statement.

"I couldn't agree more," the California Democrat wrote. "One person, one vote!"

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