120-year-old fire still burning in Colorado town

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NEW CASTLE, Colo. (KDVR) -- For more than a century a small town near the Western Slope has been burning its way into Colorado's history book.

The town of New Castle is home to a historic coal seam fire that has been burning for more than 120 years, according to History Colorado.

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There are actually two coal seam fires burning in New Castle, but the biggest and longest running is by far the one burning at the old Vulcan Mine.

See more from this unusual story:

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120-year-old fire burns in Colo. town
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120-year-old fire burns in Colo. town

The town of New Castle is home to a historic coal seam fire that has been burning for more than 120 years, according to History Colorado.

(Photo credit: KDVR)

The town of New Castle is home to a historic coal seam fire that has been burning for more than 120 years, according to History Colorado.

(Photo credit: KDVR)

The town of New Castle is home to a historic coal seam fire that has been burning for more than 120 years, according to History Colorado.

(Photo credit: KDVR)

The town of New Castle is home to a historic coal seam fire that has been burning for more than 120 years, according to History Colorado.

(Photo credit: KDVR)

The town of New Castle is home to a historic coal seam fire that has been burning for more than 120 years, according to History Colorado.

(Photo credit: KDVR)

The town of New Castle is home to a historic coal seam fire that has been burning for more than 120 years, according to History Colorado.

(Photo credit: KDVR)

The town of New Castle is home to a historic coal seam fire that has been burning for more than 120 years, according to History Colorado.

(Photo credit: KDVR)

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In the late 1800s into the early 1900s, New Castle was known as a coal mining town.

Steve Turner, the Executive Director of History Colorado, said coal seam fires aren't rare. In fact there are more than 1,000 of them world-wide. But what makes Colorado's unique, is its age.

"[It] is actually the longest burning fire in the country. It started in the late 1800s," Turner explained.

For residents of New Castle, it's considered a source of pride.

"We have this historic feature right here in town," said New Castle Mayor Pro-Tempore, Bruce Leland.

In the winter months you can usually see smoke rising from the site of the fire on Burning Mountain, even from as far back as I-70.

New Castle is about 15 miles west of Glenwood Springs. To learn more about the town, click here.

Editor's Note: Special thanks to Ann Louise Ramsey for helping us tell this story by sharing her photographs and video of New Castle!

Related: See firefighters smokingjumping:

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Firefighters smokejumping in Washington
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Firefighters smokejumping in Washington
Supervisors Guy McLean (L) and Inaki Baraibar (R) observe smokejumper recruits as they complete their first jump from an airplane into a field adjacent to the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A smokejumper navigates towards the ground after leaping from an airplane during a training exercise in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A smokejumper recruit lands after leaping from an airplane during a training exercise in a field adjacent to the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A smokejumper is seen under his parachute after leaping from an airplane during a training exercise in a field adjacent to the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Veteran smokejumpers and recruits watch as a recruit completes his first jump from an airplane into a field adjacent to the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A smokejumper lands in a large gravel circle after leaping from an airplane during a training exercise at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumpers celebrate a successful training jump at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Assistant spotter Scott McClanahan (L) and spotter Daren Belsby (R) size up the landing area for smokejumpers preparing to complete a practice jump from an airplane while flying above Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 30, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumpers navigate towards the ground after leaping from an airplane during a training exercise in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumper recruit Ross Lindell untangles his parachute after landing in cow manure during his first training jump from an airplane into a field adjacent to the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Spotter Daren Belsby communicates with a smokejumper preparing to complete a practice jump from an airplane while flying above Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 30, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumper recruit Leo Brett winds up a hose after cleaning equipment at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A smokejumper recruit lands in gravel while practising parachute landing fall techniques at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumpers exit an airplane during a training flight in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Smokejumper recruits clean their sweat-soaked equipment after training in extreme heat at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, United States June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Rookie smokejumper Brian Anderson (R) prepares to jump from an airplane with fellow smokejumpers while flying above Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 30, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Parachutes ready for use are seen in the parachute loft at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A smokejumper prepares to leap from an airplane while flying above Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 30, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumper Jeremy Zemke labels a parachute he has finished packing, in the parachute loft at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumper recruits train by jumping from a large tower while attached to zip lines at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumper recruit Jeff Rasmussen does squats with a large rock, punishment for dropping his helmet from atop the practice tower, during training at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A smokejumper recruit trains by jumping from a large tower while attached to a zip line at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Instructors (R) watch a rookie class of eight smokejumper recruits as they practise parachute landing fall techniques at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A smokejumper leaps from an airplane during a training flight above Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 30, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Smokejumper recruits exercise at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
(L-R) Supervisors Daren Belsby, Inaki Baraibar, and Fidel Verduzco observe a smokejumper recruit as he jumps from a training tower while connected to a zip line at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumper recruit Ross Lindell lands after jumping from a large tower while attached to a zip line at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumper recruits enter the parachute loft during training at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumper recruits train at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumper Jeremy Zemke labels a parachute he has finished packing, in the parachute loft at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Smokejumpers gather for a meeting in the parachute loft at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Tools for packing parachutes are seen in the parachute loft at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 7, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Magnets identifying which smokejumpers are scheduled to deploy are seen on a board in the parachute loft at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base in Winthrop, Washington, U.S., June 6, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder SEARCH "SMOKEJUMPING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
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