Obama: 'I still don't feel responsible' for Trump's win

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President Barack Obama kicked off his last official overseas trip in Greece on Tuesday saying he isn't to blame for Donald Trump's victory in the wake of an election that has left foreign leaders skittish about the next administration.

Obama, when asked by NBC News about whether he feels personally responsible for the election of Trump — seen as a referendum on his last eight years in office — the president said: "I still don't feel responsible for what the president-elect says or does," while acknowledging that the GOP nominee's win was a way for Americans to "shake things up."

Related: Obama meets with Trump

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President Obama meets with Trump
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) greets President-elect Donald Trump in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Obama and Trump discussed a range of domestic and foreign policy topics at the White House during their first meeting since Trump's stunning election victory.
U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with President-elect Donald Trump (L) to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) greets President-elect Donald Trump in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with President-elect Donald Trump (L) to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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Obama said his view of globalization and increased international relations runs counter to what Trump had campaigned on.

"Time will now tell whether the prescription being offered — whether Brexit or the U.S. election — actually ends up satisfying people who have been angry ... or concerned," Obama added in a joint news conference with Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras.

Following the divisive presidential election which saw the Republican nominee win the White House, Obama has had to allay fears following campaign rhetoric that suggested the president-elect is willing to abandon NATO allies if other partner nations don't pay more as part of the military alliance.

But after a meeting with Trump at the White House last week, Obama said Monday he remains "encouraged" by him and that he personally reaffirmed a commitment to NATO.

Obama's seven-day farewell foreign tour includes visiting the ancient Acropolis before traveling Wednesday to Germany to meet with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other European heads of state.

The outgoing commander in chief will also arrive in Peru later in the week for the Asia Pacific Cooperation summit, which will bring together Pacific nation leaders. Russian President Vladimir Putin is among the expected attendees.

A Kremlin spokesman reportedly said Putin and Obama may meet on the sidelines of the summit to discuss the ongoing conflict in Syria.

Bill Clinton was the last U.S. president to visit Greece in 1999. The nation in recent months has been grappling with a migrant and refugee crisis coupled with a difficult climb out of a deep recession that forced a string of unpopular austerity measures. Greek leaders are hoping Obama can help convince their nation's international creditors, including Germany, to forgive some of its soaring debt.

Obama praised Greece for being among the five countries of the 28-member NATO alliance who have met a requirement to pay 2 percent or more of their respective country's GDP on their own military defense.

Related: Obama Races to Protect His Legacy From Trump

The other nations include the United States, the United Kingdom, Estonia and Poland.

"Greece has done this even during its difficult economic times," Obama told reporters. "If Greece can meet this commitment, all of the nations should be able to."

Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos earlier thanked Obama upon his arrival and said the U.S. and Greece share a "solidarity ... throughout deep and painful economic and social crisis."

"I'm certain your successor, Mr. Trump, will continue on the same path," Pavlopoulos said.

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