Mike Pence is fighting his own email battle in court

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Vice President-elect and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence attacked Hillary Clinton's handling of her private emails on the campaign trail. Now, Pence is going to court to keep his own emails out of the public eye.

"What we already know here is troubling, and it's convincing millions of Americans that Hillary Clinton is just a risky choice," Pence told Fox News.

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The court case stems from President Obama's executive actions on immigration back in 2014. Pence opposed Obama's policy, and Pence's administration joined a lawsuit against the White House.

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Hillary Clinton addresses FBI email probe

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. The FBI dropped what amounts to a political bomb on the Clinton campaign on Friday when it announced it was investigating whether new emails involving the Democratic presidential nominee contain classified information.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, right, accompanied by campaign manager Robby Mook, second from right, and traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, second from left, departs after speaking at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Clinton is calling on the FBI to release more information about its review of emails that may be related to its investigation into her private server.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

DES MOINES, IA - OCTOBER 28: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to reporters following a campaign rally at Roosevelt High School on October 28, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. With less than two weeks to go until election day, Hillary Clinton is campaigning in Iowa.

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, center, accompanied by traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, left, arrives to speak at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. The FBI dropped what amounts to a political bomb on the Clinton campaign on Friday when it announced it was investigating whether new emails involving the Democratic presidential nominee contain classified information.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton holds an unscheduled news conference to talk about FBI inquiries into her emails after a campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. October 28, 2016.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leaves after an unscheduled news conference on FBI inquiries about her emails after a campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. October 28, 2016.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton answers a question during a press conference about the FBI's reopening of a probe into her use of a private email server while secretary of State, in Des Moines, Iowa, on October 28, 2016. The FBI dealt Hillary Clinton's seemingly unstoppable White House campaign a stunning blow Friday by reopening a probe into her use of a private email server while secretary of state. / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD

(JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, left, accompanied by traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, center, departs after speaking at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Clinton is calling on the FBI to release more information about its review of emails that may be related to its investigation into her private server.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Pence hired a private law firm to help fight that case, and one Indianapolis lawyer thinks that may have been a waste of taxpayer money. He's pressing the Indiana government for any information related to the hiring.

Pence's administration did turn over 57 pages of heavily-redacted information. But one item it didn't turn over was an email attachment Pence received while in office.

Pence's team argues it's protected from releasing the attachment under Indiana's Access to Public Records Act. The state's Supreme Court agreed. An appeal on the ruling is set for Nov. 21.

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Paul Jefferson, a former law professor at Indiana University, told the Indianapolis Star the case's decision could weaken the judiciary's ability to check the state's executive branch. He said, "It is hard to draw clean lines between what would be and what wouldn't be if excluded from a public records request if the court is going to exempt the executive branch from public records review."

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