Kerry becomes first Secretary Of State to visit all 7 continents

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Secretary of State John Kerry was not in Washington, D.C., on election night. He was actually traveling about as far away from civilization as possible.

Kerry is currently in Antarctica, where he plans to witness some of the greatest effects of climate change firsthand.

SEE MORE: A Giant Stretch Of Sea Near Antarctica Is Now Universally Protected

But he's also breaking a few records while he's at it.

Kerry is now the first secretary of state to visit all seven continents. According to the U.S. Department of State, he's traveled more than 1.3 million miles and spent the equivalent of 118 days in the air.

After visiting Antarctica, Kerry will fly to Marrakesh, Morocco, for the next round of climate negotiations. Combating climate change has been a pivotal aspect of Kerry's agenda.

See more photos from his trip:

19 PHOTOS
John Kerry visits Antarctica
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John Kerry visits Antarctica
US Secretary of State John Kerry visits the historic Shackleton hut near McMurdo Station in Antarctica on November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
General view of the Blood Falls and the Taylor Glacier while in flight during a visit by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and members of his delegation hike towards the historic Shackleton hut near McMurdo Station, Antarctica November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry flies over the Taylor Valley area near McMurdo Station, in Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
US Secretary of State John Kerry and scientist Kelly Falkner pose outside the historic Shackleton hut near McMurdo Station, Antarctica November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (C) disembarks from a U.S. Air Force C-17 near McMurdo Station, in Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hikes in front of Mount Erebus, in Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
The Taylor Glacier is seen in this aerial view while in flight during a visit by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry flies over the Taylor Glacier area near McMurdo Station, in Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
US Secretary of State John Kerry (R) visits the historic Shackleton hut with Scott Borg (L), the head of the Polar Program for the National Science Foundation, during Kerry's visit to McMurdo Station in Antarctica on November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (C) disembarks from a U.S. Air Force C-17 near McMurdo Station, in Antarctica, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry sits in the cockpit of his U.S. Air Force C-17 flight to Antarctica at Christchurch International Airport, New Zealand November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry leaves a chapel at the McMurdo Station in Antarctica on November 12, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry talks with New Zealand scientist Gavin Dunbar about the movement of icebergs, at the New Zealand run Scott Base, beside the Ross Sea, in Antarctica on November 12, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (C) leaves the New Zealand run Scott Base beside the Ross Sea in Antarctica on November 12, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
The motorcade of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry heads towards the Pegasus ice runway for his flight to New Zealand from Antarctica on November 12, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry looks out at a frozen section of the Ross Sea beside the McMurdo Station in Antarctica on November 12, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (2nd R) onboard a US Air Force C-17 Globemaster as it leaves the McMurdo station in Antarctica for New Zealand on November 12, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Ralston/Pool
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