Trump tells '60 Minutes' he will try to keep the 'strongest assets' of Obamacare

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US President-elect Donald Trump said he will keep parts of President Obama's health care law after campaigning on a promise to immediately repeal it in full.

Trump made the comments in an interview with Leslie Stahl for CBS' "60 Minutes," which airs on Sunday. In the same interview, Trump called his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton a "very strong and very smart" woman.

Trump said he would keep one part of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, that prevents insurers from denying coverage because of pre-existing conditions. "It happens to be one of the strongest assets," Trump told Stahl.

Trump also said he would "very much try and keep" another part of the law that allows children to be covered under their parent's insurance policies until 26. "It adds cost, but it's very much something we are going to try and keep," he said.

See photos from Trump and Obama's first White House meeting:

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U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington November 10, 2016.REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) greets President-elect Donald Trump in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump (L) to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Obama and Trump discussed a range of domestic and foreign policy topics at the White House during their first meeting since Trump's stunning election victory.
U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with President-elect Donald Trump (L) to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) greets President-elect Donald Trump in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with President-elect Donald Trump (L) to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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The president-elect added that the health care law would be repealed and replaced "simultaneously."

Trump said he was willing to preserve these two provisions of Obamacare in an interview with The Wall Street Journal as well. A big reason he is no longer calling for an all-out repeal, he told the publication, was his meeting with Obama on Thursday.

"I told him I will look at his suggestions, and out of respect, I will do that," Trump told the Journal. "Either Obamacare will be amended, or repealed and replaced."

Business Insider's Bob Bryan notes that Republicans cannot repeal these parts of the law anyway because they are not related to government funding. Additionally, roughly 20 million people could be left without health insurance even with these provisions kept.

You can watch a segment of the "60 Minutes" interview below:

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