'I am in': Howard Dean wants to be DNC Chair again

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon



Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean is putting himself back in the running for chair of the Democratic National Committee.

In a tweet on Thursday, the former chair said the party needs to rehabilitate its technology and develop a strategy that does not just play in battleground states following the upset loss to Donald Trump.

More on Hillary Clinton's loss

29 PHOTOS
Clinton supporters are fleeing her election night party in tears
See Gallery
Clinton supporters are fleeing her election night party in tears

A supporter of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton watches and waits at her election night rally in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

A Clinton supporter stands alone in the bleachers after Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally was canceled at the Jacob Javits Center in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.

(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Supporters of U.S Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton react as a state is called in favour of her opponent, Republican candidate Donald Trump, during a watch party for the U.S. Presidential election, at the University of Sydney in Australia, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Reed

A supporter of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton watches and waits at her election night rally in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Musician Lagy Gaga sits in her car after staging a protest against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump outside Trump Tower in New York City after midnight on election day November 9, 2016. Donald Trump stunned America and the world, riding a wave of populist resentment to defeat Hillary Clinton in the race to become the 45th president of the United States. The Republican mogul defeated his Democratic rival, plunging global markets into turmoil and casting the long-standing global political order, which hinges on Washington's leadership, into doubt.

(DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

Guests react to election results as they appear on a large television monitor during Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.

(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

A supporter uses his smartphone as others leave Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Supporters of Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton react at the election night rally in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

A person talks on the phone at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 9, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States.

(Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)

Emily Benn stays in a seat at the end of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally at the Jacob Javits Center in New York, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

At attendee reacts while kneeling on the floor during an election night party for 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton at the Javits Center in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. 

(Photographer: John Taggart/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

An attendee reacts while sitting on the floor during an election night party for 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton at the Javits Center in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.

(Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Matt Sanborn of Laconia, N.H., a Boston College student who volunteered for Democratic candidates including Hillary Clinton and New Hampshire Democratic Senate candidate, Gov. Maggie Hassan, rests his hands on the top of his head while watching election returns during an election night rally in Manchester, N.H., Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.

(AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

A woman weeps as election results are reported during Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.

(AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Wellesley College students and supporters of Hillary Clinton Kumari Devarajan, of Washington, left, and Diana Castillo, of Elgin, Ill,, right, wipe away tears as they watch televised election returns during a watch party on the campus of Wellesley College, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in Wellesley, Mass. Clinton graduated from Wellesley College in 1969.

(AP Photo/Steven Senne)

A supporter of U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton reacts at her election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A supporter of U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton reacts at her election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

"The dems need organization and focus on the young. Need a fifty State strategy and tech rehab. I am in for chairman again," Dean said.

The former governor's tweet echoes his strategy when he ran the DNC in the lead-up to the 2008 presidential election.

Dean aggressively courted the grassroots activists within the party while clashing occasionally with party leaders, arguing that the party should try to put every state in play, instead of focusing on key battleground states.

Though he was criticized for not raising enough money to compete with the Republican National Committee, the former governor also focused on upgrading the party's voter file and data operation, which the DNC believed it had the advantage on going into 2016.

Speaking with Business Insider on Wednesday, DNC Vice Chair RT Rybak said Dean's attempt to build a coalition and broad support within the party during his initial bid for chair in 2005 "put more democracy into the DNC."

"The best time it seems the DNC did that was when Howard Dean used his campaign apparatus to run for chair," Rybak said.

"One thing we should be asking ourselves is if we had a chair who is not representative of what was happening in the community and was perceived to be not listening, then maybe we should actually have more democracy, where there's more - where the chair actually has to go out and win a constituency and mobilize people. I hope that doesn't break along Hillary-Bernie lines, because that would be the worst thing, but I do think it's a really good time to have one of those big raw family discussions like we're all going to have over the Thanksgiving table, where there's a lot of heat but we hug on the way out the door."

Dean isn't the only Democrat vying for the spot.

The Huffington Post reported that Rep. Keith Ellison, one of the more outspoken progressive voices in the House of Representatives, is also jockeying for the DNC chair position. He garnered an endorsement from Sen. Bernie Sanders on Thursday.

NOW WATCH: A model that has correctly predicted the presidential election since 1980 says Clinton will have a landslide victory

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Trump's win has shattered the Democratic Party

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners