World leaders pledge to work with Trump after election win

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BERLIN, Nov 9 (Reuters) - World leaders pledged to work with Donald Trump after his shock victory in the U.S. presidential election but some officials expressed alarm that the vote could mark the end of an era in which Washington promoted democratic values and was seen by its allies as a guarantor of peace.

Trump, the real estate magnate and former reality TV star, sent conciliatory signals in his first remarks since his stunning upset of Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, pledging to seek common ground with America's partners, not conflict.

See more on the election outcome:

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Newspapers around the world react to Trump's win
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Newspapers around the world react to Trump's win
A businessman walks past copies of the London Evening Standard newspaper, featuring a picture of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump on its front page, waiting to be picked up in the square mile financial district of the City of London, U.K., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Donald Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States in a stunning repudiation of the political establishment that jolted financial markets and likely will reorder the nation's priorities and fundamentally alter America's relationship with the world. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Mexican holds a newspaper with headlines referring to the eventual triumph of Donald Trump on November 9, 2016 in Mexico City. / AFP / PEDRO PARDO (Photo credit should read PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images)
Mexican newspapers with their front page referring to the eventual triumph of US presidential candidate Donald Trump on November 9, 2016 in Mexico City. / AFP / YURI CORTEZ (Photo credit should read YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A Mexican holds a newspaper with headlines about on the eventual triumph of Donald Trump on November 9, 2016 in Mexico City. / AFP / PEDRO PARDO (Photo credit should read PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images)
Copies of a special edition of the Financial Times newspaper, featuring a picture of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump on its front page, sit waiting to be picked up in the square mile financial district of the City of London, U.K., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Donald Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States in a stunning repudiation of the political establishment that jolted financial markets and likely will reorder the nation's priorities and fundamentally alter America's relationship with the world. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Mexican newspaper with its front page referring to the eventual triumph of US presidential candidate Donald Trump on November 9, 2016 in Mexico City. / AFP / YURI CORTEZ (Photo credit should read YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A Mexican newspaper with its front page referring to the eventual triumph of US presidential candidate Donald Trump on November 9, 2016 in Mexico City. / AFP / YURI CORTEZ (Photo credit should read YURI CORTEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A Mexican reads a newspaper with headlines about on the eventual triumph of Donald Trump on November 9, 2016 in Mexico City. / AFP / PEDRO PARDO (Photo credit should read PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images)
View of Guatemalan newspapers informing about the victory of US presidential candidate Donald Trump in their front pages, in Guatemala City on November 9, 2016. / AFP / JOHAN ORDONEZ (Photo credit should read JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Colombian newspapers report the victory of US presidential candidate Donald Trump on their front pages, in Medellin, Colombia, on November 9, 2016 / AFP / STR / RAUL ARBOLEDA (Photo credit should read RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images)
An 'I Voted' sticker adorns a newspaper at an election watch party organized by the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Republican Donald Trump was projected to win North Carolina and Florida, an unexpectedly strong showing in results Tuesday night that potentially throws the balance in the presidential race to Michigan and Wisconsin, key parts of Hillary Clinton's Midwestern electoral firewall. Photographer: Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg via Getty Images
TOKYO, JAPAN - NOVEMBER 09: A man distributes an extra edition of a newspaper featuring a front page report on the U.S. Presidential Election and Republican President-elect Donald Trump on November 9, 2016 in Tokyo, Japan. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Yuya Shino/Getty Images)
Chilean newspapers report the victory of US presidential candidate Donald Trump on their front pages, in Santiago, on November 9, 2016 / AFP / MARTiN BERNETTi (Photo credit should read MARTIN BERNETTI/AFP/Getty Images)
An Iraqi man holds an edition of Iraqi daily newspaper Azzaman displaying pictures of US presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in Baghdad on November 9, 2016. Billionaire populist Donald Trump, tapping into an electorate fed up with Washington insiders, was on the verge of a shock victory over Hillary Clinton in a historic US presidential election that sent world markets into meltdown. / AFP / SABAH ARAR (Photo credit should read SABAH ARAR/AFP/Getty Images)
The New York Post newspaper featuring president-elect Donald Trump's victory is displayed on a New York newsstand, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016 in New York. Donald Trump claimed his place Wednesday as America's 45th president, an astonishing victory for the celebrity businessman and political novice who capitalized on voters' economic anxieties, took advantage of racial tensions and overcame a string of sexual assault allegations on his way to the White House. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
A Clarin newspaper, left, with a headline reading in Spanish "Trump was winning and U.S begins an era that shocks the world" with a picture of President-elect Donald Trump is prepared to be delivered outside a building in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
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Governments in Britain, China, Germany, Israel, Japan, Russia and Turkey all congratulated Trump and said they would work with him.

"It is not an easy path but we are ready to ready to do our part and do everything to return Russian and American relations to a stable path of development," said Russian President Vladimir Putin, for whom Trump expressed admiration during the election campaign.

Israel's Benjamin Netanyahu said he hoped to reach "new heights" in bilateral ties under Trump. And British Prime Minister Theresa May said the "enduring and special relationship" between Britain and the United States would remain intact.

But other officials, some of them with senior roles in government, took the unusual step of denouncing the outcome, calling it a worrying signal for liberal democracy and tolerance in the world.

"Trump is the pioneer of a new authoritarian and chauvinist international movement. He is also a warning for us," German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel said in an interview with the Funke newspaper group.

During his election campaign, Trump expressed admiration for Russia's Putin, questioned central tenets of the NATO military alliance and suggested that Japan and South Korea should develop nuclear weapons to shoulder their own defense burden.

He has vowed to undo a global deal on climate change struck by world powers in Paris last year, ditch trade deals he says have been bad for U.S. workers, and renegotiate the nuclear deal between Tehran and world powers which has led to an easing of sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

But U.S. allies admit to being unsure whether Trump will follow through on all of the foreign policy pledges he made during the campaign.

Iran's Foreign Minister Javad Zarif urged Trump to stay committed to the Iran deal.

His South Korean counterpart expressed hope that Trump would maintain current U.S. policy of pressuring North Korea over its nuclear and missile tests.

The South Korean government was concerned Trump may make unpredictable proposals to North Korea, a ruling party official said in Seoul, quoting top national security officials.

SEE ALSO: Women respond to Clinton's stunning loss

A Japanese government official, speaking before Trump clinched the election, urged him to send a message as soon as possible to reassure the world of the United States' commitment to its allies.

"We are certainly concerned about the comments (Trump) has made to date about the alliance and the U.S. role in the Pacific, particularly Japan," the Japanese official said,

Some leaders are smarting from insults that Trump doled out over the past months. He called Chancellor Angela Merkel "insane" for allowing a million migrants into the country last year, unfavorably likening his opponent Clinton to the German leader.

"We're realizing now that we have no idea what this American president will do," said Norbert Roettgen, a conservative ally of Merkel and head of the German parliament's foreign affairs committee, told German radio. "Geopolitically we are in a very uncertain situation."

But like-minded right-wing European parties that are hoping to make inroads of their own in 2017, an epic election year in which Germany, France, the Netherlands, and possibly Italy and Britain, could hold elections, hailed Trump's victory.

"Their world is falling apart. Ours is being built," Florian Philippot, a senior figure in France's far-right National Front (FN), tweeted.

RELATED: Markets plunge amid presidential election results

13 PHOTOS
Markets plunge amid presidential election results
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Markets plunge amid presidential election results
A broker reacts as President-elect Donald Trump shows up on a television screen at the stock market in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.
(AP Photo/Michael Probst)

A pedestrian and financial journalist look at their phones as they are reflected in a window in front of a board displaying stock prices at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) in Sydney, Australia, November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/David Gray)

A man walks in front of an electronic board displaying market indices from around the world, outside a brokeragein Tokyo, Japan, November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Issei Kato)

A broker reacts while trading at his computer terminal at a stock brokerage firm in Mumbai, India, November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui)

An investor looks at his smartphone showing results from the US presidential election, at a securities company in Beijing on November 9, 2016. Stock markets around the region plunged in morning trading on November 9 as incoming results from the US presidential election suggested Donald Trump was leading markets favorite Hillary Clinton in the White House race.  

(WANG ZHAO/AFP/Getty Images)

A board displaying the exchange rates of Mexican peso against the U.S. dollar is seen at a foreign exchange house in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, November 8, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez/TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

An employee of a foreign exchange trading company works in front of a monitor displaying a graph of the Japanese yen's exchange rate against the U.S. dollar in Tokyo, Japan, November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

People walk past an electric quotation board flashing the Nikkei key index of the Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE) in front of a securities company in Tokyo on November 9, 2016. Japanese shares went into free fall as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump appeared to be closing in on the White House.

(TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)

A currency trader works at the foreign exchange dealing room of the KEB Hana Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. The rising prospect of a Trump presidency jolted markets around the world Wednesday, sending Dow futures and Asian stock prices sharply lower as investors panicked over uncertainties on trade, immigration and geopolitical tensions.

(AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

A man walks past a display of the Hang Seng Index at a bank in Hong Kong Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Asian shares have shed early gains, tumbling Wednesday as Donald Trump gained the lead in the electoral vote count in the presidential election. Dow and S&P futures also plunged. Earlier, investors had appeared persuaded that Hillary Clinton, seen as a more stable choice, would prevail.

(AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

Currency traders work at the foreign exchange dealing room of the KEB Hana Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. The rising prospect of a Trump presidency jolted markets around the world Wednesday, sending Dow futures and Asian stock prices sharply lower as investors panicked over uncertainties on trade, immigration and geopolitical tensions.

(AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

A trader reacts as a television news report shows U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaking following the U.S. Presidential election result announcement, inside the Frankfurt Stock Exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, on Wednesday, Nov. 09, 2016. Global markets were thrown into disarray as Donald Trump won the U.S. presidential election, shocking traders after recent polls indicated that Hillary Clinton would be the victor.

(Photographer: Alex Kraus/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

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Prominent British historian Simon Schama described a Trump victory and Republican control of both the Senate and U.S. House of Representatives as a "genuinely frightening prospect."

"NATO will be under pressure to disintegrate, the Russians will make trouble, 20 million people will lose their health insurance, climate change (policies) will be reversed, bank regulation will be liquidated. Do you want me to go on?," Schama told the BBC.

"Of course it's not Hitler. There are many varieties of fascism. I didn't say he was a Nazi although neo-Nazis are celebrating."

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