We'll save you the Google search: Here's how impeachment works

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In the history of the United States there have only been two presidents who were impeached: President Andrew Johnson in February 1868 and President Bill Clinton in December 1998.

Here is a laymen's version of how an impeachment can go down.

An impeachment resolution needs to begin in the House of Representatives, before then proceeding to the United States Senate. The impeachment's origin is the House Judiciary Committee. Under guidance from the Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, the committee investigates whether or not a president should be impeached. If they decide he or she should be impeached they will then bring in the rest of the members of the House of Representatives to vote on the article or articles of impeachment.

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If they agree that something has occurred that warrants impeachment, such as treason, then the resolution is transferred to the Senate.

The Senate then presides over a trial, in which the President of the United States is afforded full legal counsel.

Once the trial is complete the Senate votes on the verdict. Two-thirds of the Senate must agree on a verdict in order to lay down a punishment. The Senate then votes to remove the president from office.

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