ISIS is happy Trump won: 'The world is on the verge of exploding'

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Fans of the Islamic State are celebrating the election victory of Donald Trump, convinced the Republican candidate's anti-Islamic position will alienate and anger many people around the world and rally more to their cause.

"He'll rule with undisputed control and this will lead to open conflicts with many people," said one person on an ISIS forum Wednesday. Vocativ found several threads created on ISIS channels after the election results became clear, with users noting "good tidings with the demise of America." In these threads, the terror group's supporters claim "Trump will put the final nail in the coffin of America" and that "the world is on verge of exploding, and this stupid who came to power will push the button of defeat." On Twitter, ISIS supporters wondered "how a stupid person like Trump can lead the infidel nations."

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Demonstrators hold signs during a rally against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Seattle, Washington, U.S. November 20, 2016. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Protestors march against advisers of US President-elect Donald Trump. including Steve Bannon, Trump's chief strategist and senior counselor, at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts on November 30, 2016. / AFP / Ryan McBride (Photo credit should read RYAN MCBRIDE/AFP/Getty Images)
Man wearing a jacket with anti-Trump sticker during a protest against Wells Fargo for partially bankrolling the Dakota Access Pipeline. Los Angeles, California. November 26, 2016. The demonstrators stand in solidarity with the native American Sioux tribe in their efforts to stop the construction of the oil pipeline. President-elect, Donald Trump holds stock in Energy Transfer Partners, the company that is building the pipeline. (Photo by Ronen Tivony/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
A sign seen during a protest against Wells Fargo for partially bankrolling the Dakota Access Pipeline. Los Angeles, California. November 26, 2016. The demonstrators stand in solidarity with the native American Sioux tribe in their efforts to stop the construction of the oil pipeline. President-elect, Donald Trump holds stock in Energy Transfer Partners, the company that is building the pipeline. (Photo by Ronen Tivony/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
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Diane Knutson (L) and Sandy Hartman of Seattle hold signs as people gather to hold hands in protest of US President-elect Donald Trump on Green Lake in Seattle, Washington on November 19, 2016. / AFP / Jason Redmond (Photo credit should read JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images)
A supporter of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump (R) argues with a man against Trump in Times Square, Manhattan, New York, U.S. on November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Bria Webb
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A supporter of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump (front) is shoved by a supporter of former U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton after Trump was declared the winner in Times Square in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
A supporter of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump (L) argues with a man against Trump in Times Square, Manhattan, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Bria Webb
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A person yells during a protest against President-elect Donald Trump, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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Police confront protesters during a demonstration against President-elect Donald Trump, early Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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Even though Trump himself vowed to "crush ISIS" during his campaign, at least one prominent forum user who goes by the name al-Fajir said he hoped Trump's win would lead to a pause in the fight for the Iraqi city of Mosul. He suggested that perhaps the support the Iraqi government was getting from the U.S. in the form of equipment as well as military advisors would end. The Iraqi government "will not be able to continue its war against the Islamic State for a single day" and that "the foreign policy of Trump will be catastrophic" for Iraqi forces.

At the same time, it was likely, al-Fajr said, that Trump might increase American involvement in the war as a show of strength. America "will sink in the mud," he wrote. "He will send its army, navy, and air force, and they will become entangled in the swamp and will never get out of it."

Last Saturday, ISIS' English-language media wing released a seven-page article about the U.S. presidential election and warned American Muslims to not vote for either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump, quoting verses from the Quran saying democracy was antithetical to Islam. "After almost thirty years of history proving to the entire world that there is no difference between the American Republican and Democratic parties in their policies against Islam and Muslims," the group said.

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A broker reacts as President-elect Donald Trump shows up on a television screen at the stock market in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.
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A pedestrian and financial journalist look at their phones as they are reflected in a window in front of a board displaying stock prices at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) in Sydney, Australia, November 9, 2016.

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A man walks in front of an electronic board displaying market indices from around the world, outside a brokeragein Tokyo, Japan, November 9, 2016.

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A broker reacts while trading at his computer terminal at a stock brokerage firm in Mumbai, India, November 9, 2016.

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An investor looks at his smartphone showing results from the US presidential election, at a securities company in Beijing on November 9, 2016. Stock markets around the region plunged in morning trading on November 9 as incoming results from the US presidential election suggested Donald Trump was leading markets favorite Hillary Clinton in the White House race.  

(WANG ZHAO/AFP/Getty Images)

A board displaying the exchange rates of Mexican peso against the U.S. dollar is seen at a foreign exchange house in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, November 8, 2016.

(REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez/TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

An employee of a foreign exchange trading company works in front of a monitor displaying a graph of the Japanese yen's exchange rate against the U.S. dollar in Tokyo, Japan, November 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Toru Hanai)

People walk past an electric quotation board flashing the Nikkei key index of the Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE) in front of a securities company in Tokyo on November 9, 2016. Japanese shares went into free fall as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump appeared to be closing in on the White House.

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A currency trader works at the foreign exchange dealing room of the KEB Hana Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. The rising prospect of a Trump presidency jolted markets around the world Wednesday, sending Dow futures and Asian stock prices sharply lower as investors panicked over uncertainties on trade, immigration and geopolitical tensions.

(AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

A man walks past a display of the Hang Seng Index at a bank in Hong Kong Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. Asian shares have shed early gains, tumbling Wednesday as Donald Trump gained the lead in the electoral vote count in the presidential election. Dow and S&P futures also plunged. Earlier, investors had appeared persuaded that Hillary Clinton, seen as a more stable choice, would prevail.

(AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

Currency traders work at the foreign exchange dealing room of the KEB Hana Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. The rising prospect of a Trump presidency jolted markets around the world Wednesday, sending Dow futures and Asian stock prices sharply lower as investors panicked over uncertainties on trade, immigration and geopolitical tensions.

(AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

A trader reacts as a television news report shows U.S. President-elect Donald Trump speaking following the U.S. Presidential election result announcement, inside the Frankfurt Stock Exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, on Wednesday, Nov. 09, 2016. Global markets were thrown into disarray as Donald Trump won the U.S. presidential election, shocking traders after recent polls indicated that Hillary Clinton would be the victor.

(Photographer: Alex Kraus/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

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The post ISIS Is Happy Trump Won: "The World Is On The Verge Of Exploding" appeared first on Vocativ.

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