Voters wrongly asked for ID at the polls in Pennsylvania

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Pennsylvania has seen widespread reports of voters wrongly being asked for identification by poll workers, according to Election Protection, a coalition of organizations monitoring voting.

Two voters told NBC News they had been asked for photo ID.

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"I recently moved into my voting area, so I brought everything with me, and I figured I would hand them my voter registration card," said Nicole Sorgini, 27, of Philadelphia, who voted at the Cook Wissackon School.

"When I handed it to them they said, 'No, I need your driver's license,' and someone else in line said, 'Oh, I only have my voter ID card.'"

Poll workers then told them they require driver's licenses for new voters, Sorghini said.

"I had my driver's license so I just used that, but I told them technically under the law, you can use the voter ID card."

More on U.S. voter ID laws

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Hotel manager Tad Stricker, one of the plaintiffs in an ACLU suit against the voter ID law enacted by Kansas, talks about his problems registering to vote in Wichita, Kansas, U.S., May 11, 2016. REUTERS/Dave Kaup
Hotel manager Tad Stricker, one of the plaintiffs in an ACLU suit against the voter ID law enacted by Kansas, talks about his problems registering to vote in Wichita, Kansas, U.S., May 11, 2016. REUTERS/Dave Kaup
Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach talks about the Kansas voter ID law that he pushed to combat what he believes to be rampant voter fraud in the United States in his Topeka, Kansas, U.S., office May 12, 2016. REUTERS/Dave Kaup TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach looks on as he talks about the Kansas voter ID law that he pushed to combat what he believes to be rampant voter fraud in the United States in his Topeka, Kansas, U.S., office May 12, 2016. REUTERS/Dave Kaup
Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach talks about the Kansas voter ID law that he pushed to combat what he believes to be rampant voter fraud in the United States in his Topeka, Kansas, U.S., office May 12, 2016. REUTERS/Dave Kaup
Kansas Attorney General Kris Kobach supports Donald Trump during his rally inside Century II, where the Republican presdential caucus took place, in Wichita, Kan., on Saturday, March 5, 2016. (Fernando Salazar/Wichita Eagle/TNS via Getty Images)
WICHITA, KS - MARCH 5: A woman makes a joke as she cast her ballot during the state's Republican caucus on March 5, 2016 in Wichita, Kansas. People were standing in line for more than two hours to vote in the caucus. (Photo by J Pat Carter/Getty Images)
WICHITA, KS - MARCH 5: Two women wait in line to cast their ballots during the state's Republican caucus on March 5, 2016 in Wichita, Kansas. People were standing in line for more than two hours to vote in the caucus. (Photo by J Pat Carter/Getty Images)
WICHITA, KS - MARCH 5: Marcia Kraft and Lynn Antrim wait in line to vote during the state's Republican caucus on March 5, 2016 in Wichita, Kansas. People were standing in line for more than two hours to vote in the caucus. (Photo by J Pat Carter/Getty Images)
WICHITA, KS - MARCH 5: Two women casts their ballots for Republican candidates during the state's Republican caucus on March 5, 2016 in Wichita, Kansas. People were standing in line for more than two hours to vote in the caucus. (Photo by J Pat Carter/Getty Images)
WICHITA, KS - MARCH 5: A woman cast her ballot for a presidential candidate during the state's Republican caucus on March 5, 2016 in Wichita, Kansas. People were standing in line for more than two hours to vote in the caucus. (Photo by J Pat Carter/Getty Images)
WICHITA, KS - MARCH 5: Melyssa Roberson tries to rally support for her candidate as she stands in line to vote during the state's Republican caucus on March 5, 2016 in Wichita, Kansas. People were standing in line for more than two hours to vote in the caucus. (Photo by J Pat Carter/Getty Images)
WICHITA, KS - MARCH 5: A Donald Trump supporter stands in line to vote during the states Republican caucus on March 5, 2016 in Wichita, Kansas. People were standing in line for more than two hours to vote in the caucus. (Photo by J Pat Carter/Getty Images)
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Sorgini said she called Election Protection to report it.

"I'm thinking she was maybe just misinformed," Sorgini said of the worker. "But it was worrisome because there were a lot of new voters there, and you don't know if everyone had photo ID."

Ryan Kellermeyer, 39, also of Philadelphia, said when he showed up to vote at Cayuga Elementary, the poll worker asked him for ID. He told her it was not required and said she insisted. Ultimately, he said, she allowed him to vote without showing ID.

"I think she wasn't trained very well," said Kellermeyer, who has voted at the location before and believes the worker was new. "I was told by others she had been asking everyone for ID."

Kellermeyer said he reported it to a pollwatcher and to Clinton campaigners outside. Although he does not think it was nefarious, he is concerned that some people might be dissuaded from voting.

Under Pennsylvania law, ID is required for new voters or voters voting at a new site for the first time, but photo ID is not required. A photo ID law passed in 2012 was blocked ahead of the 2012 election. It was struck down by a court the following year.

A spokeswoman for the Pennsylvania secretary of state's office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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