No, you can't vote by text message

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon



It's impossible to vote by text message, but a fake ad aimed at Clinton supporters on Twitter is urging them to save a trip to the polls and vote via cell phone.

The memes, which mimic the look of Clinton's real ads -- complete with "Paid for by Hillary for President 2016" at the bottom -- encourage voters to "Save time. Avoid the line" and vote early by texting "Hillary" to 59925. One fake ad was written entirely in Spanish. The ads have been tweeted from several alt-right accounts.

SEE MORE: In-depth coverage of the 2016 election

According to The Washington Post, the ads gained traction after the account @TheRickyVaughn tweeted the images with a pro-Clinton #ImWithHer hashtag. The account, which has since been suspended, frequently tweeted anti-Clinton conspiracy theories and appeared to be the source of a tweet sent by Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller referring to Clinton by a vulgar name.

As the fake get-out-the-vote ads began to spread, some users took notice and questioned whether they were a violation of either federal law or Twitter policy.

Robert McNees, an associate professor of physics at Loyola University of Chicago, said he reached out to Twitter and initially received what appeared to be a form letter in response that found the tweets weren't against the social network's rules.



But later, several hours later, a spokesman wrote back again, saying the problem had been fixed and that Twitter had started removing the images.

Tech site Mashable said that when they tried sending a message to the number in the ads, a text response makes it clear the ad wasn't official.

"The ad you saw was not approved by iVisionMobile OR Hillary For America in any way," the text response said. "To opt-in to the real HFA list, text HFA to 47246. Reply STOP to cancel."

The fake ads were quickly debunked, but they come as voting rights activists have expressed alarm over what they believe are systematic efforts by Donald Trump, the Republican Party and GOP supporters to suppress minority turnout.

The Democratic Party has filed lawsuit against the state Republican parties in Arizona, Nevada, Ohio and Pennsylvania, accusing them of attempts to intimidate voters, while a federal judge in North Carolina on Wednesday called purges from registration rolls are "insane."

24 PHOTOS
Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's final campaign days
See Gallery
Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's final campaign days
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton acknowledges the crowd at a campaign rally in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. November 6, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Leesburg, Virginia, U.S. November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign rally in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Protest signs urging more civility in American politics flank a long row of signs supporting Republican President candidate Donald Trump in Hillsborough, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake 
A child dressed up as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump waits at a campaign event in Hershey, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Hershey, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
Jay Z and Beyonce share a kiss before Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a free campaign concert in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., November 4 , 2016. REUTERS/Aaron Josefczyk 
Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway speaks before Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Hershey, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A cardboard cutout of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is pictured on a the media charter plane with a countdown clock to the election while sitting on the tarmac at the airport in Tampa, Florida, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Barack Obama takes the stage to deliver remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event in support of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst 
U.S. President Barack Obama puffs out his cheeks at a baby as he greets people in the crowd after his remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and businessman/NBA Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban talk on her campaign plane in Moon, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
People listen as U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Atkinson, New Hampshire, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Ground crew wait with a set of bunting wrapped stairs for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump to attend a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Barack Obama greets people before delivering remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Supporters pose with a large effigy of U.S. Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump, while waiting to attend a campaign event with U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A Donald Trump supporter disrupts remarks by U.S. President Barack Obama at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets audience members at a campaign rally at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
U.S. President Barack Obama takes the stage to deliver remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event at Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton walks through Heinz Field, home of the NFL's Pittsburgh Steelers, after a campaign rally in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Trump has encouraged his supporters to "watch" polling stations, ostensibly to prevent a "rigged election," and his call has been taken up by white nationalist groups who have made plans to intimidate voters in Philadelphia.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners