Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton set for election night battle in NYC

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Inside both Trump and Clinton's NYC election night events
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Inside both Trump and Clinton's NYC election night events
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 8: Men walk backstage at the Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's Election Night event at New York Hilton Midtown in New York City on Nov. 8, 2016. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: A screen is positioned in front of buildings ahead of Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event outside the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 8, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
Workers iron a US flag as they prepare the US map shaped stage for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 8, 2016. Eager voters crowded into polling stations to choose a new US president Tuesday after a wild and bitter contest between the billionaire populist Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, the Democrat seeking to become the first woman to win the White House. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK CITY - NOVEMBER 8: Trump campaign paraphernalia is seen behind a velvet rope at Donald Trump's Election Night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York City on Nov. 8, 2016. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
A supporter wearing a cape watches Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
A Trump supporter waits for the Trump rally to begin at the Hilton Hotel during the U.S. presidential election in New York City, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: Preperations take place before Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown on November 8, 2016 in New York City. Americans today will choose between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton as they go to the polls to vote for the next president of the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Supporters cheer as they watch election returns during Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
People begin to arrive outside the Jacob Javits Center for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's rally in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
People watch elections returns during election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 8, 2016. US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will hold her election night event at the convention center. / AFP / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
A 'Make America Great Again' sign is displayed ahead of an election night party for 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump at the Hilton Midtown hotel in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. Fifty-one percent of voters nationally were bothered a lot by Trump's treatment of women, while Democrat Hillary Clinton's use of private e-mail while secretary of state was troubling to 44 percent, according to preliminary exit polling as voting neared a close in some states. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: A supporter of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends the election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown on November 8, 2016 in New York City. Americans today will choose between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton as they go to the polls to vote for the next president of the United States. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Supporters celebrate during Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
NEW YORK CITY - NOVEMBER 8: A Donald Trump supporter takes a picture of the press pen at Republican presidential nominee Donald Trumps election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York City on Nov. 8, 2016. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
A supporter holds a sign at the election night rally for U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in Manhattan, New York, U.S., on November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
'Hispanics For Trump' signs sit on a table ahead an election night party for 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump at the Hilton Midtown hotel in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. Fifty-one percent of voters nationally were bothered a lot by Trump's treatment of women, while Democrat Hillary Clinton's use of private e-mail while secretary of state was troubling to 44 percent, according to preliminary exit polling as voting neared a close in some states. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: A supporter of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump cheers during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown on November 8, 2016 in New York City. Americans today will choose between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton as they go to the polls to vote for the next president of the United States. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: Eva Pearson of Long Island, NY holds her hands to her face as she watches voting results at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 8, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is projected on a screen on election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 8, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Woman hold ups up boxing gloves while cheering during an election night party for 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton at the Javits Center in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. Fifty-one percent of voters nationally were bothered a lot by Republican Donald Trump's treatment of women, while Clinton's use of private e-mail while secretary of state was troubling to 44 percent, according to preliminary exit polling as voting neared a close in some states. Photographer: John Taggart/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Two women chat ahead of Republican Donald Trump's election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 8, 2016. Millions of Americans turned out Tuesday to decide whether to send Democrat Hillary Clinton to the White House as their first woman president or to put their trust in Republican maverick populist Donald Trump. / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Guests watch a screen proclaiming Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as winning the state of Illinois at the election night rally at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump watch news reports as results come in during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 8, 2016. Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were running neck and neck Tuesday in early results as polling stations closed in the eastern United States, with the world waiting anxiously to see who will win the historic White House clash. A deeply divided electorate of about 200 million Americans were asked to make a momentous choice between electing the nation's first woman president, or handing the reins of power to a billionaire populist who has upended US politics with his improbable outsider campaign. / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
A guest reacts as she watches results on a television screen during Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
A man reacts to returns at Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Marvin DeLeon (L) of Washington County, NY, cries as he stands in the overflow crowd for Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump watch early results during the election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown on November 8, 2016 in New York City. Americans today will choose between Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton as they go to the polls to vote for the next president of the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump watch news reports as results come in during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 8, 2016. Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were running neck and neck Tuesday in early results as polling stations closed in the eastern United States, with the world waiting anxiously to see who will win the historic White House clash. A deeply divided electorate of about 200 million Americans were asked to make a momentous choice between electing the nation's first woman president, or handing the reins of power to a billionaire populist who has upended US politics with his improbable outsider campaign. / AFP / Timothy A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump watch results unfold on a TV screen during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 8, 2016. / AFP / Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump react to unfolding results during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 8, 2016. / AFP / Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton watch elections results during election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 8, 2016. / AFP / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton react to early poll results during election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 8, 2016. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman weeps as election results are reported during Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's election night rally in the Jacob Javits Center glass enclosed lobby in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
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For the first time in over 70 years, New York City will host two presidential nominees on election night when Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton hold dueling Tuesday night events in Manhattan.

Not since 1944 has the presidential race featured two New Yorkers as major-party candidates — Trump resides at Midtown's Trump Tower, also his campaign headquarters, and Clinton lives outside the city in Chappaqua, with her headquarters in Brooklyn. On Tuesday night, however, the opponents will be only two miles apart: Clinton preparing for victory under a symbolic glass ceiling on the West Side and Trump hosting an invite-only gathering at a Midtown hotel, surprisingly not bearing his name.

At the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center (655 W 34th St.), the Hillary for America Election Night Event kicks off at 6 p.m. The West Side's six-block glass fortress has an atrium with a glass ceiling — an apt symbol for Clinton's potential to make history as the first female president of the United States. When celebrating her historic nomination at the Democratic National Convention, she "shattered" a digital glass ceiling declaring: "I can't believe we just put the biggest crack in that glass ceiling yet!"

A look at the Democratic candidate casting her vote earlier today:

10 PHOTOS
Hillary Clinton heads to the polls
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Hillary Clinton heads to the polls
CHAPPAQUA, NY - NOVEMBER 08: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greets supporters after voting at Douglas Grafflin Elementary School on November 8, 2016 in Chappaqua, New York. Hillary Clinton cast her ballot in the presidential election as the rest of America goes to the polls to decide between her and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her husband former U.S. president Bill Clinton depart after voting in the U.S. presidential election at the Grafflin Elementary School in Chappaqua, New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton gives a thumbs up to the supporters gathered outside the Douglas Grafflin Elementary School where Clinton cast her ballot in Chappaqua, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Members of the public surround U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton as she casts her ballot at the Douglas Grafflin Elementary School in Chappaqua, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, accompanied by her husband, former President Bill Clinton, left, smiles as she votes at Douglas G. Grafflin School in Chappaqua, N.Y., Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. At far left is senior aide Huma Abedin. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, accompanied by her husband, former President Bill Clinton, votes at Douglas G. Grafflin School in Chappaqua, N.Y., Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton steps away from a voting booth after voting at Douglas G. Griffin School November 8, 2016 in Chappaqua, New York. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton fills out her ballot at the Douglas Grafflin Elementary School in Chappaqua, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, bottom right, accompanied by her husband, former President Bill Clinton, top left, votes at Douglas G. Grafflin School in Chappaqua, N.Y., Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
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The nominee had planned to shoot a celebratory fireworks display over the Hudson River, but NYPD chief of intelligence Tommy Galati said during a Monday press conference on Election Day security that the potential victory show was canceled, despite the campaign having a permit. The fireworks were reported to last for two minutes at 9:30 p.m., a half-hour after polls close in New York.

Read more: Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton Make Bids at Rallies Before Election Day

The Clinton campaign website still instructs guests to dress for outside weather, as well as prepare for "airport-like security." The event is open to the public and hundreds of her supporters lined up for tickets on Monday.

As for the GOP nominee, the Donald J. Trump Victory Party opens its doors at 6:30 p.m. at the New York Hilton Midtown (1335 Ave of the Americas), only a flew blocks from Trump Tower. Trump and running mate Mike Pence will be hosting friends and supporters of the Trump-Pence campaign.

A look at the Republican candidate casting his vote earlier today:

8 PHOTOS
Donald Trump heads to the polls
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Donald Trump heads to the polls
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 8: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump departs after voting at the Beckman Hill International School in New York City. After a contentious campaign season, Americans go to the polls today to choose the next president of the United States. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his wife Melania prepare to submit their ballots at a polling station in a school during the 2016 presidential elections on November 8, 2016 in New York. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump (C) waves after casting his vote with daughter Ivanka Trump (L) and her daughter Arabella Rose Kushner on Election Day at PS 59 November 8, 2016 in New York City. Trump's marathon final two days of campaigning marched through 10 cities in two days, stretching into Election Day. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, with his wife Melania, right, hands over his ballot to an election worker after voting at PS-59, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his wife Melania Trump vote at PS 59 in New York, New York, U.S. November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump casts his ballot, in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump watches as his daughter Ivanka puts an "I Voted" sticker on her daughter Arabella, after casting their ballots at PS-59, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
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Though the quintessential New York hotel has hosted many high-profile events, as well as past presidents, the intimate ballroom setting diverges from Trump's usually large rallies. The atrium in his Trump Tower, however, is a privately own public space and the nominee was fined $10,000 by the city of New York when he used it to launch his campaign last year. The Washington Postcited a source close to the campaign who said the low-key victory celebration is due to Trump being "superstitious" and not wanting to jinx the results with an over-the-top celebration.

Read more: Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump Release Final Campaign Ads Ahead of Election Day

One thing guests at both events can expect is heightened security, and plans for street closures indicate that Clinton and Trump will be narrowing their distance even further as the night goes on.

Also during Monday's press conference, NYPD Chief of Department Carlos Gomez said there will be full street closures at the Peninsula Hotel, on 55th Street from Fifth Avenue to Sixth Avenue, starting Tuesday afternoon. He added that Tuesday morning will also begin to see street closures at Trump Tower, on East 56th Street from Fifth to Madison avenues. "We'll do that as long as Donald Trump is in the tower," he said. "When he goes out, we'll try to open traffic best we can."

According to the New York Post, Clinton is planning an after party at the Peninsula Hotel on Fifth Avenue — which stands only one block from Trump Tower.

Amid all the anticipated Midtown hubbub, much of Broadway has closed their shows on election night. The Metropolitan Opera and Carnegie Hall also will be dark. "This is by far the largest election detail the NYPD has ever had, it is more than double our previous high," said Gomez, who compared the planned security to New Year's Eve and Pope Francis' Big Apple visit.

New Yorkers can expect street closures near both Clinton and Trump's official venue locations starting Tuesday afternoon: on 11th Avenue between 34th and 40th Streets, and 34th Street between the West Side Highway and 10th Avenue near the Javits center; and West 53rd and 54th Streets between Sixth and Seventh Avenues near the Hilton.

Check back in tonight for live updates inside both Clinton and Trump's election night events.

Read more: So, You're a Celebrity Who Wants to Move to Canada...

Related: Check out the various (and trendy) voting stickers states are handing out:

13 PHOTOS
What 'I Voted!' stickers look like around the country
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What 'I Voted!' stickers look like around the country
"I voted" stickers are on display for voters in the U.S. presidential election at Grace Episcopal Church in The Plains, Virginia, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Ohio voting stickers for early voters sit on a table at the Fairfield County Board of Elections Office in Lancaster, Ohio, U.S., on Saturday, Oct. 29, 2016. Democrats are battling in almost a dozen close races to pick up enough seats to take over the chamber that Republicans now govern with a four-seat majority, while Republicans argue they should be kept in control there as a check on Clinton should the Democrat be elected president. Photographer: Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 08: A voter is seen outside the polls after casting their ballot in the national election on November 8, 2016 in New York, United States. (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)
PROVO, UT - NOVEMBER 08: A couple shows off their 'I Voted' sticker as they leave Wasatch Elementary school after casting their ballot in the presidential election on November 8, 2016 in Provo, Utah. Americans across the nation make their choice for the next president of the United States today. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 26: A Las Vegas Strip-themed 'I Voted' sticker is displayed at an early voting site at the Meadows Mall on October 26, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Voters in Clark County are voting early at a record pace this year ahead of the November 8 general election. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
'I voted' stickers, given to those who vote, are seen November 8, 2016, at Colin Powwell Elementary School, in Centreville, Virginia. Polling stations opened Tuesday as the first ballots were cast in the long-awaited election pitting Hillary Clinton against Donald Trump. / AFP / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Ranelle Taylor points to her 'I Voted' sticker after voting in the US presidential election at Santa Monica City Hall on November 8, 2016 in Santa Monica, California. America's future hung in the balance Tuesday as millions of eager voters cast ballots to elect Democrat Hillary Clinton as their first woman president, or hand power to the billionaire populist Donald Trump. / AFP / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - November 8: 'I Voted' stickers wait to be handed to citizens at Loudon County High School after they cast their ballots in the 2016 Presidential Elections in Leesburg, Va., USA on November 8, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Seth Schaecher, a deputy election official, displays stickers that he gives to voters, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, at a polling place in Exeter, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Iris Pettigrew carries voting stickers for voters after they cast their ballots, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Precinct worker Carolyn Scott holds a voter sticker at the Bermuda precinct during the U.S presidential election in Dillon, South Carolina, November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Randall Hill
A poll worker hands out an "I voted" sticker to a voter during the U.S. presidential election at Potomac Middle School in Dumfries, Virginia, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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