This t-shirt is the scary logical endpoint of Trump's media tantrums

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As the election nears, Donald Trump continues taking his trademark anti-media rhetoric to new heights, and his most hardcore supporters are taking that message to heart.

People at Trump rallies now routinely drop by the media area to give journalists a piece of their minds, such as chanting "Jew-S-A" at them.

It shouldn't entirely come as a surprise, then, to see someone at a Trump rally on Sunday wearing this:

Yeah, it's gross. It's also the logical endpoint of the Trump media-bashing narrative.

Photos of Trump being rushed off stage at a recent rally:

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Trump rushed off stage
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Trump rushed off stage
Members of the Secret Service rush Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump off the stage at a campaign rally in Reno, Nev., on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A man, at background center with blue sweater, is escorted by law enforcement officers moments after Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was rushed offstage by Secret Service agents during a campaign rally in Reno, Nev., on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Police officers stand guard backstage after U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump was hustled off the stage by security agents at a campaign event following a perceived threat in the crowd, in Reno, Nevada, U.S. November 5, 2016. Trump returned to the stage a few minutes later to continue his rally speech. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Security personnel rush off stage after Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump was escorted away during a rally at the Reno-Sparks Convention Center in Reno, Nevada on November 5, 2016. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the Secret Service rush Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump off the stage at a campaign rally in Reno, Nev., on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump (centre L) addresses supporters during a campaign rally at the National Western Complex in Denver, Colorado on November 5, 2016. White House Republican candidate Donald Trump was earlier in the day bundled off stage by security officers on November 5 after a false gun scare during a campaign appearance. / AFP / Jason Connolly (Photo credit should read JASON CONNOLLY/AFP/Getty Images)
Melania Trump watches her husband, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, speak during a campaign rally, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016, in Wilmington, N.C. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is hustled off the stage by security agents following a perceived threat in the crowd at a campaign rally in Reno, Nevada, U.S. November 5, 2016. Trump returned to the stage a few minutes later to continue his rally speech. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Members of the Secret Service rush Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump off the stage at a campaign rally in Reno, Nev., on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A man is escorted by law enforcement officers moments after Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was rushed offstage by Secret Service agents during a campaign rally in Reno, Nev., on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
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From the start, Trump's made hating the media a central part of his campaign. He's called out particular reporters by name, mocked a journalist with a disability, and claimed that the media was conspiring to get Hillary Clinton elected.

That's a small sampling of the overall media-focused narrative that Trump has further embraced as the campaign has gone on. Heckling the press at his rallies is now as common as saying that the entire election is going to be rigged, or that Clinton should be in jail.

As the election neared, Trump's message turned into one of conspiracy and powerlessness. In Trump's reality, the media has corrupted the system to the point that extrajudicial killings are the only way to go. What else are you supposed to do when the country you love is being taken over by the forces meant to keep power in check?, the thinking goes.

There's something slightly more insidious to that shirt, though. It doesn't excoriate the media at-large. It targets the profession, and a person who pursues that profession. That all goes without mentioning the racial undertones of this shirt, in an election that's been one of the most racially charged in decades. Trump polls near 0% with black voters. The U.S. has a dark history with the lynching of black people, with a 2015 study finding that almost 4,000 were people killed in "racial terror lynchings" throughout the south between 1877 and 1950.

In this election cycle, death threats to journalists aren't all that uncommon. NBC's Katy Tur had to be escorted out of a rally by the Secret Service, with someone later tweeting "KILL EM ALL START W/ KATY TUR." Other journalists have been threatened in a similar fashion.

As for where the shirt came from, there's a few different places on the internet all hawking the same election-themed stuff. One site, Zazzle.com, pulled the shirt. Thandsinks.com still has it available.


RELATED: Photos of each candidate's final days on the campaign trail:
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Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's final campaign days
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Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's final campaign days
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton acknowledges the crowd at a campaign rally in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. November 6, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Leesburg, Virginia, U.S. November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign rally in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Protest signs urging more civility in American politics flank a long row of signs supporting Republican President candidate Donald Trump in Hillsborough, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake 
A child dressed up as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump waits at a campaign event in Hershey, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Hershey, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri 
Jay Z and Beyonce share a kiss before Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a free campaign concert in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., November 4 , 2016. REUTERS/Aaron Josefczyk 
Campaign Manager Kellyanne Conway speaks before Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Hershey, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A cardboard cutout of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is pictured on a the media charter plane with a countdown clock to the election while sitting on the tarmac at the airport in Tampa, Florida, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Barack Obama takes the stage to deliver remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event in support of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst 
U.S. President Barack Obama puffs out his cheeks at a baby as he greets people in the crowd after his remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and businessman/NBA Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban talk on her campaign plane in Moon, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
People listen as U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Atkinson, New Hampshire, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Ground crew wait with a set of bunting wrapped stairs for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump to attend a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. President Barack Obama greets people before delivering remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Supporters pose with a large effigy of U.S. Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump, while waiting to attend a campaign event with U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
A Donald Trump supporter disrupts remarks by U.S. President Barack Obama at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greets audience members at a campaign rally at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
U.S. President Barack Obama takes the stage to deliver remarks at a Hillary for America campaign event at Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S., November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton walks through Heinz Field, home of the NFL's Pittsburgh Steelers, after a campaign rally in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. November 4, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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