Here's who would win the election if every American voted

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Tomorrow is Election Day in the US, but a large chunk of the population probably won't vote. Just 53.6% turned out in 2012.

This is a big deal, because it skews results toward certain demographics of Americans. People who are white, over 65, college-educated, or make at least $50,000 make up the largest portion of voters.

SEE MORE: In-depth coverage of the 2016 election

But what would the US — home to one of the world's lowest voter turnout rates — look like if everyone cast their ballots? And who would win the presidency this year?

The country's political landscape would be remarkably different, Jan Leighley, a professor of political science at American University, tells Business Insider. Her research focuses on American political behavior and voter turnout.

Here's what would probably happen if everyone voted (Note: In this hypothetical future, we're not talking about a direct democracy, where people vote or write laws themselves. Voters would still choose representatives to do that).

The political landscape would become more liberal — but only on some issues.

When more people turn out, laws are more likely to reflect the needs of the majority and less likely to cater to a specific demographic, Leighley says.

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Must-win states for Hillary Clinton
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Must-win states for Hillary Clinton

Florida

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally at Reverend Samuel Delevoe Memorial Park on February 1, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (Photo by mpi04/MediaPunch/IPX via Getty Images)

Pennsylvania

Hillary Clinton campaigns for President of the United States at University of Pennsylvania on October 22, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Taylor Hill/WireImage)

Wisconsin

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to a question at a campaign event in Madison, Wisconsin, United States, March 28, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Jim Young)

Michigan

Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally at Wayne State University on October 10, 2016 in Detroit, Michigan. A day after the second presidential debate in St. Louis, Hillary Clinton is campaigning in Michigan and Ohio. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Virginia

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (C) speaks next to Virginia first lady Dorothy McCauliffe (L) and James Barnett (R) at a discussion on national security during a campaign event at the Virginia Air and Space Center in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., June 15, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Gary Cameron)

New Hampshire

Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally at Alumni Hall Courtyard, Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire U.S., October 24, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Minnesota

U.S. Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the American Federation of Teachers conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota, July 18, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Adam Bettcher)

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Voter turnout in the US is dismal, but Republicans are generally more likely to vote — and they did in this year's primaries. If more Democrats voted, a greater number of local and national policies would be more liberal than they are now, Leighley says. But it would also depend on the issues at stake.

For example, voters are more conservative than non-voters on laws relating to reproductive rights. On laws relating to universal healthcare, voters are more liberal than non-voters.

Candidates would need more nuanced campaign tactics.

Candidates would need to shift their campaign strategies too, Leighley says. They would need to consider that literally everyone is voting — not just the people who normally vote.

For example, as noted by Flash Forward's Rose Eveleth, there's considerable evidence that the wealthier you are, the more likely you are to vote. Candidates would probably cater less to a wealthier demographic if they knew that people from all levels of economic status planned to cast their ballots.

"They would need to take into account that's it's not just the wealthy who will vote, but everyone," she says.

Imagine if every millennial — the demographic with the lowest turnout — voted. Candidates are already using Snapchat and tweeting #yas to appeal to younger voters, but with a 100% turnout, they'd need to get even more crafty.

Would we have laws written entirely in emojis? A nationwide forgiveness for college loans? Vetoes to all hoverboard bans and music pirating laws? The possibilities are endless.

Hillary Clinton would likely win the presidential election.

8 PHOTOS
Must-win states for Hillary Clinton
See Gallery
Must-win states for Hillary Clinton

Florida

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally at Reverend Samuel Delevoe Memorial Park on February 1, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (Photo by mpi04/MediaPunch/IPX via Getty Images)

Pennsylvania

Hillary Clinton campaigns for President of the United States at University of Pennsylvania on October 22, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Taylor Hill/WireImage)

Wisconsin

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to a question at a campaign event in Madison, Wisconsin, United States, March 28, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Jim Young)

Michigan

Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally at Wayne State University on October 10, 2016 in Detroit, Michigan. A day after the second presidential debate in St. Louis, Hillary Clinton is campaigning in Michigan and Ohio. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Virginia

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (C) speaks next to Virginia first lady Dorothy McCauliffe (L) and James Barnett (R) at a discussion on national security during a campaign event at the Virginia Air and Space Center in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., June 15, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Gary Cameron)

New Hampshire

Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally at Alumni Hall Courtyard, Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire U.S., October 24, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Minnesota

U.S. Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the American Federation of Teachers conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota, July 18, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Adam Bettcher)

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It's obvious why Democrats would support mandatory voting. Although Obama won two elections with at least 51% of the vote, midterm elections tend to look much different for Democrats. As NPR notes, the demographics that boosted Obama's wins — namely young people, minorities, and single women — are those who are less likely to vote in the primaries, general elections, and midterms. According to a recent Gallup poll, 65% of Democrats and 76% of Republicans said they "will definitely vote" tomorrow.

If 100% of voters turned out, ballots would weigh more heavily toward Democrat candidates. So it'd be easy to predict who would win the popular vote (and likely the electoral college vote) this year: Hillary Clinton.

Although elections would sway toward Democrat candidates, Leighley adds that neither candidate would be able to predict what states they would win based on previous voter turnout stats if everyone voted. More states would swing blue, though.

"We'd have more conflict. Some people who would normally win with 50% turnout would lose," she says. "Power would shift.

8 PHOTOS
Must-win states for Donald Trump
See Gallery
Must-win states for Donald Trump

Florida

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump pumps his fist in the air during a campaign rally at the Collier County Fairgrounds on October 23, 2016 in Naples, Florida. Early voting in Florida in the presidential election begins October 24. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Ohio

US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally at The Champions Center Expo in Springfield, Ohio, on October 27, 2016. (Photo credit PAUL VERNON/AFP/Getty Images)

Iowa

Donald Trump, 2016 Republican presidential nominee, speaks during the 2nd annual Roast and Ride hosted by Senator Joni Ernst, a Republican from Iowa, not pictured, in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2016. Ernst, who in 2014 won the Senate seat vacated by Democrat Tom Harkin when he retired, has turned her Roast and Ride into the conservative answer to the Harkin's legendary Steak Fry fundraiser, which auditioned dozens of presidential candidates over its 37-year history. (Photo by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

North Carolina

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally on September 12, 2016 at U.S. Cellular Center in Asheville, North Carolina. Trump criticized Democratic rival Hillary Clinton for saying that half of his supporters belong in a 'basket of deplorables.' (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)

Nevada

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

New Hampshire

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a town hall, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, in Sandown, N.H. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Colorado

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters during a campaign rally, Saturday, Oct. 29, 2016, in Golden, Colo. (AP Photo/ Brennan Linsley)

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