Final NBC/WSJ poll: Clinton holds a four-point National Lead Over Trump

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Democrat Hillary Clinton holds a four-point lead over Republican Donald Trump in the final national NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll of the 2016 presidential race.

Clinton gets support from 44 percent of likely voters, while Trump gets 40 percent. Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson is at 6 percent, and the Green Party's Jill Stein is at 2 percent.

In a two-way contest without Johnson and Stein, Clinton's advantage over Trump expands to five points, 48 percent to 43 percent.

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Must-win states for Hillary Clinton

Florida

Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally at Reverend Samuel Delevoe Memorial Park on February 1, 2016 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (Photo by mpi04/MediaPunch/IPX via Getty Images)

Pennsylvania

Hillary Clinton campaigns for President of the United States at University of Pennsylvania on October 22, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Taylor Hill/WireImage)

Wisconsin

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to a question at a campaign event in Madison, Wisconsin, United States, March 28, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Jim Young)

Michigan

Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally at Wayne State University on October 10, 2016 in Detroit, Michigan. A day after the second presidential debate in St. Louis, Hillary Clinton is campaigning in Michigan and Ohio. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Virginia

Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (C) speaks next to Virginia first lady Dorothy McCauliffe (L) and James Barnett (R) at a discussion on national security during a campaign event at the Virginia Air and Space Center in Hampton, Virginia, U.S., June 15, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Gary Cameron)

New Hampshire

Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally at Alumni Hall Courtyard, Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire U.S., October 24, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Minnesota

U.S. Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the American Federation of Teachers conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota, July 18, 2016. (Photo via REUTERS/Adam Bettcher)

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Clinton's current lead over Trump is down from the 11-point edge she enjoyed in the four-way horserace in the previous NBC/WSJ poll in mid-October, 48 percent to 37 percent.

That poll was conducted after 2005 video of Trump surfaced with him saying that "you can do anything" to women when you are a star like he is. "Grab them by the p****. You can do anything."

In the two-way contest last month, Clinton's lead was 10 points, 51 percent to 41 percent.

This newest poll - conducted Nov. 3-5 of more than 1,200 likely voters - comes after the letter FBI Director James Comey sent to Congress on Oct. 28 saying that the FBI had "learned of the existence of emails that appear to be pertinent" to the investigation of Clinton.

Clinton maintains double-digit lead with women

Looking inside the numbers of the two-way horserace, Clinton is ahead of Trump among women (53 percent to 38 percent), African Americans (86 percent to 7 percent), Latinos (65 percent to 20 percent) and those ages 18-34 (55 percent to 32 percent).

Trump, meanwhile, leads among men (47 percent to 42 percent), seniors (49 percent to 42 percent) and whites (53 percent to 38 percent).

But there's a significant difference among whites: Those without college degrees are breaking for Trump by a 2-to-1 margin, 60 percent to 30 percent.

Yet among whites with college degrees, Clinton is ahead by 10 points, 51 percent to 41 percent.

Clinton leads among those who are early voters, 53 percent to 39 percent, while Trump is up among those who will wait to vote on Election Day, 48 percent to 41 percent.

Majority feels comfortable with Clinton as president

The NBC/WSJ poll also finds 52 percent of likely voters saying they would be comfortable and prepared to support Clinton as president if she wins on Tuesday night, versus 46 percent who say they wouldn't be comfortable.

That's compared with just 43 percent of likely voters who say they would be comfortable with Trump as president. Fifty-four percent say they'd be uncomfortable.

The NBC/WSJ poll was conducted Nov. 3-5 of 1,282 likely voters (including more than 600 reached by cell phone), and it has a margin of error of plus-minus 2.7 percentage points. The rest of the poll will be released at 5:00 pm ET.

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