Clinton's plan for Russia would likely be the opposite of Trump's

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Lots has been made about Donald Trump's relationship with Russia and its president, Vladimir Putin, during election season.

"I've never met Putin. I don't know who Putin is. He said one nice thing about me," Trump said at a campaign rally in 2016.

Back in 2013, Trump said of Putin, "I do have a relationship with him."

SEE MORE: A Veteran Spy Claims Russia Has Been Aiding Trump For Years

Many of the United States' NATO allies are concerned Trump would refuse to honor the pact and let Russia exert a strong influence over the region.

7 PHOTOS
President Obama and Putin at G-20
See Gallery
President Obama and Putin at G-20
Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) meets with U.S. President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China, September 5, 2016. Sputnik/Kremlin/Alexei Druzhinin/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) meets with U.S. President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China, September 5, 2016. Sputnik/Kremlin/Alexei Druzhinin/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses during his remarks in a news conference at the conclusion of the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China September 5, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Barack Obama holds a news conference at the conclusion of the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China September 5, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) meets with U.S. President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China, September 5, 2016. Sputnik/Kremlin/Alexei Druzhinin/via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a press conference after the conclusion of the G-20 Summit in Hangzhou in eastern China's Zhejiang Province, Monday, Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

But we haven't heard much about what Hillary Clinton would do about Russia if she were elected commander in chief. It looks like her approach would be the complete opposite of Trump's.

While the GOP nominee has been showering Putin with praise, Clinton has indicated she would probably just ignore him.

In her book "Hard Choices," Clinton recalled advising as secretary of state that President Obama should just blow him off. She wrote, "Don't appear too eager to work together. Don't flatter Putin with high-level attention. Decline his invitation for a presidential summit."

During Clinton's time as secretary of state, the Obama administration famously tried to reset its relationship with Russia, but that didn't last long.

Clinton criticized the Kremlin for supporting Bashar al-Assad in Syria and allegedly rigging elections to keep Putin in power.

And now that intelligence experts have confirmed Russia was behind hacks into the Democratic National Committee, that's certainly not going to help mend any fences between Putin and Clinton.

Putin denied any involvement in hacked or leaked information related to the presidential election, but foreign policy experts say he still harbors a grudge against Clinton from her time as the United States' top diplomat.

SEE MORE: Who's Really A Puppet? The Presidential Candidates Point To Each Other

So it's safe to expect Russia and the U.S. would have a frosty relationship during a Clinton administration, and she definitely wouldn't be a Putin puppet.

"Well that's because he'd rather have a puppet as president —" Clinton started to say during the third presidential debate.

"No puppet, no puppet. You're the puppet," Trump interjected.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners