Paris agreement may not stop rising global temperatures

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The Paris Agreement is now in effect — but a U.N. report says the ambitious goals might not work like they're supposed to.

The Paris Agreement is meant to cap global rising temperatures at 2 degrees Celsius. And in theory, it works.

RELATED: World leaders meet during the UN conference on climate change

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World leaders meet during the UN conference on climate change
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World leaders meet during the UN conference on climate change
French President Francois Hollande, front center, poses with world leaders for a group photo as part of the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (Ian Langsdon/Pool via AP)
U.S. President Barack Obama, centre left, and other world leaders pose for a group photo as part of the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (Ian Langsdon/Pool via AP)
Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and U.S. President Barack Obama shake hands at the COP21 UN Conference on Climate Change in Paris, France, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
French President Francois Hollande, right, and Ukraine's President Petro Porochenko arrive for a group photo as part of the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (Ian Langsdon/Pool via AP)
U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks during the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, on Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
U.S. President Barack Obama, left, talks with President of Djibouti Ismail Omar Guelleh during a plenary session at COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, on Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
British Prime Minister David Cameron, let, Britain's Prince Charles, center left, Prince Albert II of Monaco, center right, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrive for a group photo as part of the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. More than 150 world leaders are meeting under heightened security, for the 21st Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP21/CMP11), also known as "Paris 2015" from November 30 to December 11. (Martin Bureau/Pool Photo via AP)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses world leaders at the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
French President Francois Hollande, left, greets U.S. President Barack Obama as he arrives for the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (Guillaume Horcajuelo/Pool via AP)
Russian President Vladimir Putin looks on during a plenary session at the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, on Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel watches President Barack Obama deliver remarks during the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, on Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
U.S President Barack Obama attends the opening ceremony of the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, Pool)
U.S. President Barack Obama, left, meets with Chinese President Xi Jinping during their meeting held on the sidelines of the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
The honor guards are reflected in the limousine carrying Russian President Vladimir Putin, center left, as he arrives for the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena, Pool)
Police officers with sniffer dogs of the bomb disposal unit lab patrol at the entrance of the COP21, United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Le Bourget, outside Paris, Monday, Nov. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
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The agreement was ratified earlier this year — it required at least 55 countries that represent 55 percent of global emissions to ratify it. The European Union, Canada and nine other countries bumped that number over the threshold.

But the annual U.N. Emissions Gap Report says predicted 2030 emissions put world temperatures on track to rise 2.9 to 3.4 degrees this century — even if the Paris deal is followed to a T.

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Critics did raise concern about the Paris Agreement when it was in negotiations. They saw loopholes in legal procedures and claimed the seemingly weak terms made it easy to sign on.

That's not reason to throw the agreement out the window — the head of the U.N. Environment Program called it a step "in the right direction." The deal will still slow climate change, just not enough to avoid serious effects.

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