Ex-KKK leader David Duke says Hillary Clinton 'should be getting the electric chair'

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Candidates vying for a Louisiana US Senate seat met on the debate stage in New Orleans on Wednesday night.

Among the candidates — which included Republican frontrunner John Kennedy and Democratic candidate Caroline Fayard — was former Ku Klux Klan leader, David Duke.

Duke is running as a Republican. He was added to the debate roster last month, after crossing the 5% polling threshold needed to attend.

RELATED: Dillard University students pepper sprayed protest David Duke (KKK)

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Dillard University students pepper sprayed protest David Duke (KKK)
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Dillard University students pepper sprayed protest David Duke (KKK)
Protesters slap and kick a police car transporting former Klansman and current U.S. senatorial candidate David Duke, after a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Protestors were outside because of his presence at the historically black college. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Protesters slap and kick a police car transporting former Klansman and current U.S. Senate candidate David Duke, after a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Protestors were outside because of his presence at the historically black college. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Former Klansman and current U.S. Senate candidate David Duke tries to make his points after reporters cleared from his area to interview other candidates, after a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Protestors were outside because of his presence at the historically black college. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Police keep protesters from pushing through a door, before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, as they protest the presence of former Klansman David Duke, a current U.S. Senate candidate, who was participating in the debate at the historically black college. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Police keep protesters from pushing through a door, before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, as they protest the presence of former Klansman David Duke, a current U.S. Senate candidate, who was participating in the debate at the historically black college. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Police keep protesters from pushing through a door, before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. As candidates for the U.S. Senate, including former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, began a debate a tight knot of people around one entrance to the auditorium suddenly scattered, some yelling that they had been "maced" or pepper sprayed. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
A police officer reacts from pepper spray after officers were using it to keep protesters from entering the building, before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. They were protesting the appearance of former Ku Klux Klan leader and current U.S. Senate candidate David Duke, who was participating in the debate at the historically black university. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
A police officer pushes his way outside to keep protesters at bay, before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. They were protesting the presence of former Ku Klux Klan leader and current U.S. Senate candidate David Duke, who was participating in the debate at the historically black college. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
A police officer reacts from pepper spray after officers were using it to keep protesters from entering the building, before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. They were protesting the appearance of former Ku Klux Klan leader and current U.S. Senate candidate David Duke, who was participating in the debate at the historically black university. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
A police officer, front, points a taser as a protester jumps on a door, whole police officers try to keep out protesters against the former Ku Klux Klan leader and current senate candidate David Duke, before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. The top five candidates, including Duke, who are running for Louisiana's soon-to-be-vacant U.S. Senate seat are meeting for their last debate ahead of next week's election, at the historically black university. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
A protester jumps on a door as police try to keep out protesters against the former Ku Klux Klan leader and current senate candidate David Duke, before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. The top five candidates, including Duke, who are running for Louisiana's soon-to-be-vacant U.S. Senate seat are meeting for their last debate ahead of next week's election, at the historically black university. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Water bottles and pepper spray fly as police try to keep out protestors before a debate for Louisiana candidates for the U.S. Senate, at Dillard University, a historically black university, in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, as they protest the presence of former Klansman David Duke, a current U.S. Senate candidate, who was participating in the debate at the historically black college. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
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The affair got off to a fiery start, when Fayard called Duke a bad guy who "slithered out of the swamp." Duke, who is a self-avowed white-supremacist, took umbrage at the remark, saying "Yeah, I'm the bad guy because I defend the people of this country that made our country great," loosely co-opting Donald Trump's campaign slogan, "Make America Great Again."

Duke invoked Trump's name early and often during the debate, and compared himself to the GOP nominee while complaining that he is unfairly criticized for his controversial views.

"I will be Donald Trump's most loyal advocate," Duke said.

Trump has repeatedly disavowed Duke's support and, more recently, that of a KKK publication that endorsed him this week.

The debate quickly went off the rails when Duke got into an extended shouting match with the moderator.

Watch the exchange here, starting at the 22:43 mark.

In defending some unsavory remarks about Jews, Duke said "I'm not opposed to all Jews ... there is a problem in America with a very strong, powerful, tribal group that dominates our media and dominates our international banking."

He also accused such groups of controlling the reins of American foreign-policy, citing the civil war in Syria while attempting to draw parallels between those groups and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

"The lady should be getting the electric chair, being charged with treason," Duke said.

The debate was held at Dillard University in New Orleans, a historically black liberal-arts school. Notably, the auditorium where the debate was held appeared to be mostly empty.

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