Obama breaks silence on FBI after email probe announcement: 'We don't operate on innuendo'

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President Barack Obama offered his first comments on the FBI in an interview published on Wednesday, days after Director James Comey announced the bureau was examining new emails related to the probe into Hillary Clinton's private server.

Obama told NowThisNews, a left-leaning outlet, that the "norm" for his administration is "we don't operate on incomplete information" and "leaks."

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"I do think that there is a norm that when there are investigations we don't operate on innuendo and we don't operate on incomplete information and we don't operate on leaks," he said in the interview. "We operate based on concrete decisions that are made."

"When this was investigated thoroughly last time the conclusion of the FBI, the conclusion of the Justice Department, the conclusion of repeated congressional investigations was she had made some mistakes but that there wasn't anything there that was prosecutable," the president added.

Obama said, however, he did not want to meddle in the process.

Related to the email scandal

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Hillary Clinton, Huma Abedin and Anthony Weiner sexting scandal
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Hillary Clinton, Huma Abedin and Anthony Weiner sexting scandal
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton looks on as she was looking at a smartphone when she leaves a fundraiser at a private home in Southampton, N.Y., Sunday, Aug. 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, center, leaves a fundraiser at a private home in Southampton, N.Y., Sunday, Aug. 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton looks at a smartphone as she leaves a fundraiser at a private home in Southampton, N.Y., Sunday, Aug. 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Huma Abedin, center, an aide to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, poses for a photograph with members of the audience after Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton accompanied by Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., speaks at a rally at Florida International University Panther Arena in Miami, Saturday, July 23, 2016. Clinton has chosen Kaine to be her running mate. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
In this photo taken Aug. 28, 2016, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's senior aid Huma Abedin, center, departs a fundraiser at a private home in Southampton, N.Y. Abedin says she is separating from husband Anthony Weiner after another sexting revelation involving the former congressman from New York. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, followed by aide Huma Abedin, right, walks on the tarmac as she arrives to board Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Tuesday, July 5, 2016. President Barack Obama and Clinton are traveling to Charlotte, N.C. to campaign together. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner, left, listens as his wife, Huma Abedin, speaks during a news conference at the Gay Men's Health Crisis headquarters, Tuesday, July 23, 2013, in New York. The former congressman says he's not dropping out of the New York City mayoral race in light of newly revealed explicit online correspondence with a young woman. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
Huma Abedin, aide to Democratic U.S. presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, points as Mrs. Clinton waves to attendees at the conclusion of the second official 2016 U.S. Democratic presidential candidates debate in Des Moines, Iowa, November 14, 2015. REUTERS/Jim Young
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, center, accompanied by Mike Vlacich, New Hampshire state director, Hillary for America, and her aide Huma Abedin look to place their order Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, at a Dunkin' Donuts in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Anthony Weiner, left, and Huma Abedin arrive at The Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute Benefit Gala, celebrating the opening of "Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology" on Monday, May 2, 2016, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, makes a selfie with customers as her aide Huma Abedin, right, speaks with a cashier Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, at a Dunkin' Donuts in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, and her personal aide Huma Abedin offer to buy ice cream for reporters from Allison Porreca at Dairy Twirl, Friday, July 3, 2015, in Lebanon, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Huma Abedin, left, an aide to Hillary Rodham Clinton, watches the Democratic presidential contender greet members of the audience following a speech at the David N. Dinkins Leadership and Public Policy Forum, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. in New York. David Dinkins is at center. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Huma Abedin, longtime aide to Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, attends a Clinton campaign rally in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S., July 5, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder/File Photo
In this photo taken Jan. 5, 2011, then-New York Rep. Anthony Weiner and his wife, Huma Abedin, an aide to then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, are pictured after a ceremonial swearing in of the 112th Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin says she is separating from husband Anthony Weiner after another sexting revelation involving the former congressman from New York. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Anthony Weiner and wife Huma Abedin attend the 12th Annual CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Awards at Spring Studios on Monday, Nov. 2, 2015, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)
Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., and his wife, Huma Abedin, aide to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, are pictured after a ceremonial swearing in of the 112th Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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Comey came under fire from Democrats and some political analysts for notifying Congress in a short letter that an unrelated investigation turned up "pertinent" emails related to Clinton's case. The announcement was made just 11 days prior to Election Day.

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The FBI director had previously determined over the summer that Clinton acted with "extreme carelessness" in using the server while serving as secretary of state, but concluded at the time that "no reasonable" prosecutor would go forward with a case.

Multiple reports said Comey went against the recommendation of Attorney General Loretta Lynch in sending his letter to Congress. During a rally in Ohio this week, Clinton insisted the FBI will not come to any new conclusions and that the agency has "no case" against her.

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