Poll: Startling number of people say Hillary Clinton may be a demon

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A few weeks after President Obama addressed rumors that he is a demon in front of a crowd, people seem to be unsure about Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton as well.

According to a poll of 985 likely Florida voters from Public Policy Polling, 19 percent of them say they think Clinton is a demon.

In addition to that number, 14 percent say they aren't sure if she is a demon or not.

Source: Public Policy Polling

Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones said on his Oct. 10 show that Hillary Clinton is "an abject, psychopathic, demon from Hell that as soon as she gets into power is going to try to destroy the planet."

He accused Clinton of "smelling like hell," and brought the president into it as well.

"Imagine how bad she smells, man. I'm told her and Obama just stink stink stink stink," Jones said.

At a rally in North Carolina the next day, President Obama sniffed himself in front of the audience to confirm that he does not smell bad.

Technically, he didn't deny that he is a demon, and there's a chance those likely Florida voters from the poll picked up on that.

Results from this same poll show 4 percent of respondents would like to see Ken Bone, darling of the second presidential debate, become president.

Source: Public Policy Polling

See photos of Obama campaigning for Clinton:

12 PHOTOS
Obama campaigns for Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina
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Obama campaigns for Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
People listen as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
People react as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A protester shouts slogans as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A protester is escorted out as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Protesters shout slogans as U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama attends a campaign event for U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S. October 11, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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