Trump climbs back into contention as Clinton's email investigation looms

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Election Day is a little over a week away, and polls continue to tighten as Hillary Clinton's private email server returns to the headlines.

According to the latest Real Clear Politics national polling average, Clinton's lead over Republican nominee Donald Trump has dipped to 4.3 percentage points after the former secretary of state's lead surged to over 7 points earlier in October. Clinton previously peaked at 49 percent of the national average but has since fallen to 47.6 percent, while Trump has climbed back to 43.3 percent after plummeting to as low as 41.4 percent.

Trump's polling numbers aren't the only election indicator to see an increase in late October. Over the course of the previous two weeks FiveThirtyEight's Election Forecast has nearly doubled the GOP nominee's chances of winning the election -- taking Trump's chances from 11.2 percent to now a 21.0 percent chance. Clinton still holds a commanding lead in FiveThirtyEight's forecast, however, 78.9 percent now marks her first dip below 80 percent in since October 6.

Trump took to Twitter Sunday to celebrate the new numbers which appear to suggest a resurgence of momentum for the GOP hopeful.

"Now leading in many polls, and many of these were taken before the criminal investigation announcement on Friday - great in states!" Trump said.

While Trump has seen an uptick in the latest numbers, according to Real Clear Politics, the former secretary of state continues to lead slightly or at least tie with Trump in the majority of major national polls.

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Hillary Clinton addresses FBI email probe
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Hillary Clinton addresses FBI email probe

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. The FBI dropped what amounts to a political bomb on the Clinton campaign on Friday when it announced it was investigating whether new emails involving the Democratic presidential nominee contain classified information.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, right, accompanied by campaign manager Robby Mook, second from right, and traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, second from left, departs after speaking at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Clinton is calling on the FBI to release more information about its review of emails that may be related to its investigation into her private server.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

DES MOINES, IA - OCTOBER 28: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to reporters following a campaign rally at Roosevelt High School on October 28, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. With less than two weeks to go until election day, Hillary Clinton is campaigning in Iowa.

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, center, accompanied by traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, left, arrives to speak at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. The FBI dropped what amounts to a political bomb on the Clinton campaign on Friday when it announced it was investigating whether new emails involving the Democratic presidential nominee contain classified information.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton holds an unscheduled news conference to talk about FBI inquiries into her emails after a campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. October 28, 2016.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leaves after an unscheduled news conference on FBI inquiries about her emails after a campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. October 28, 2016.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton answers a question during a press conference about the FBI's reopening of a probe into her use of a private email server while secretary of State, in Des Moines, Iowa, on October 28, 2016. The FBI dealt Hillary Clinton's seemingly unstoppable White House campaign a stunning blow Friday by reopening a probe into her use of a private email server while secretary of state. / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD

(JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, left, accompanied by traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, center, departs after speaking at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Clinton is calling on the FBI to release more information about its review of emails that may be related to its investigation into her private server.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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As Trump mentioned on Twitter, these numbers are all snapshots taken prior to the bombshell news that FBI Director James Comey will investigate emails that appear related to Clinton's private email server. Trump applauded Comey's decision and claimed the news was "bigger than Watergate."

Over the weekend, Clinton and her campaign fiercely called for Comey to release more details regarding the investigation, going as far as to call the FBI director's letter "long on innuendo and short on facts," even blaming Comey for the "overblown" reaction that followed.

BY: WILLIAM STEAKIN

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