Fact checking everything Trump and Clinton said about the FBI's email review

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Donald Trump championed the news that the FBI is reviewing additional emails "pertinent" to previous investigations into Hillary Clinton's private email server as a game changer on Friday.

"This changes everything," he said to roaring crowds on the campaign trail that interrupted him with chants of "lock her up."

But much of Trump's rhetoric about the Clinton emails is riddled with errors, while the Democratic nominee herself obscured how the news of the additional email review was released.

We fact checked everything both candidates said on Friday, and will continue doing so here. Here's what they got right — and wrong — when talking about the FBI and the former secretary of state's emails.

"The FBI, after discovering new emails, is reopening their investigation into Hillary Clinton," Trump said in Lisbon, Maine, and Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday.

See more on Clinton's email investigation:

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Hillary Clinton addresses FBI email probe
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Hillary Clinton addresses FBI email probe

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. The FBI dropped what amounts to a political bomb on the Clinton campaign on Friday when it announced it was investigating whether new emails involving the Democratic presidential nominee contain classified information.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, right, accompanied by campaign manager Robby Mook, second from right, and traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, second from left, departs after speaking at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Clinton is calling on the FBI to release more information about its review of emails that may be related to its investigation into her private server.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

DES MOINES, IA - OCTOBER 28: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to reporters following a campaign rally at Roosevelt High School on October 28, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. With less than two weeks to go until election day, Hillary Clinton is campaigning in Iowa.

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, center, accompanied by traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, left, arrives to speak at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. The FBI dropped what amounts to a political bomb on the Clinton campaign on Friday when it announced it was investigating whether new emails involving the Democratic presidential nominee contain classified information.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton holds an unscheduled news conference to talk about FBI inquiries into her emails after a campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. October 28, 2016.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leaves after an unscheduled news conference on FBI inquiries about her emails after a campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. October 28, 2016.

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton answers a question during a press conference about the FBI's reopening of a probe into her use of a private email server while secretary of State, in Des Moines, Iowa, on October 28, 2016. The FBI dealt Hillary Clinton's seemingly unstoppable White House campaign a stunning blow Friday by reopening a probe into her use of a private email server while secretary of state. / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD

(JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, left, accompanied by traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, center, departs after speaking at a news conference at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Clinton is calling on the FBI to release more information about its review of emails that may be related to its investigation into her private server.

(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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False. This is not a reopening; as a technical matter, it was never closed. The FBI said they were reviewing emails that "appear to be pertinent" to previous investigations into Clinton's use of a private email server, but noted "the FBI cannot yet assess whether or not this material may be significant."

"This is the biggest political scandal since Watergate," Trump said at his rallies Friday.

Hardly. Bill Clinton was impeached by the House of Representatives for lying under oath to Congress about an affair he had with an intern; no one has found Hillary Clinton guilty of a crime to date.

"In brief remarks tonight, Hillary Clinton tried to politicize this investigation by attacking and falsely accusing the FBI director of only sending the letter to Republicans. Another Clinton lie. As it turned out, the letter was sent to both Republican and Democratic leaders in Congress," he said in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Clinton said the letter is "only going originally to Republican members of the House," which is not true. The letter was directed at Republican Congressional Committee chairmen and copied to ranking Democratic members, so Trump is right that she's blurring the facts to imply politicization. That said, he has spent weeks politicizing the previously completed FBI investigation as "rigged" and part of a global conspiracy.

"The FBI would never have reopened this case at this time if it were not a most egregious criminal offense," Trump said in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

There is absolutely no evidence of this.

"We have not been contacted by anyone. First we knew about it is, I assume, when you knew about it, when this letter sent to Republican members of the House was released," Clinton said.

As noted above, the letter was released to the Republican Congressional Committee chairman — in both the Senate and House — and copied to ranking Democratic members.

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