Quakes cause fear, injuries, widespread damage in central Italy

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CAMPI, Italy, Oct 27 (Reuters) - Daylight revealed widespread damage in central Italy on Thursday after strong earthquakes overnight that caused panic and fear among residents just two months after a quake nearby killed hundreds.

No one was killed this time, but dozens of people sustained minor injuries and about four others more serious ones, Italy's Civil Protection Agency said.

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Many residents of Campi, a town of about 200, slept in their cars as aftershocks rocked the Umbria, Marche and Lazio regions throughout the night. The earthquake on Aug. 24 in the same area killed nearly 300 people and destroyed several towns.

"I can't shake off the fear," said Mauro Viola, 64, who said he had not sleep and had spent the night outside.

PHOTOS: See the aftermath in Italy

21 PHOTOS
Earthquake in Visso, central Italy
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Earthquake in Visso, central Italy
A firefighter with a rescue dog search a collapsed building after an earthquake in Borgo Sant'Antonio near Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
A Virgin Mary statue is seen in a collapsed church after an earthquake in Borgo Sant'Antonio near Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
A painting is seen in a collapsed church after an earthquake in Borgo Sant'Antonio near Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
Sport equipment is seen in a collapsed store after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
A firefighter carries jackets after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
A man sits on a camping bed after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
An Italian army soldier carries supplies after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
An Italian army soldier carries supplies after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
Two women carry their belongings after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
A collapsed building is seen after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
Firefighters walks in front of a collapsed building after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
A woman carries her belongings after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
A man covers himself with a blanket after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi
A woman carries her belongings after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A collapsed building is seen next to a petrol station after an earthquake in Visso, central Italy, October 27, 2016. REUTERS/Max Rossi TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Still image from video shows a man trying to remove rubble from a road after an earthquake in Visso, Italy October 26, 2016. REUTERS/Reuters Tv
A picture shows a damaged church in the village of Visso, central Italy, that was hit by earthquakes, on October 27, 2016. Twin earthquakes rocked central Italy on October 26, 2016 -- the second registering at a magnitude of 6.0 -- in the same region struck in August by a devastating tremor that killed nearly 300 people. The quakes were felt in the capital Rome, sending residents running out of their houses and into the streets. The second was felt as far away as Venice in the far north, and Naples, south of the capital. / AFP / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture shows a destroyed house in the village of Borgo Sant'Antonio hit by earthquakes, on October 27, 2016 near Visso, central Italy. Twin earthquakes rocked central Italy on October 26, 2016 -- the second registering at a magnitude of 6.0 -- in the same region struck in August by a devastating tremor that killed nearly 300 people. The quakes were felt in the capital Rome, sending residents running out of their houses and into the streets. The second was felt as far away as Venice in the far north, and Naples, south of the capital. / AFP / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture shows a damaged building in the village of Visso, central Italy, on October 27, 2016. Twin earthquakes rocked central Italy on October 26, 2016 -- the second registering at a magnitude of 6.0 -- in the same region struck in August by a devastating tremor that killed nearly 300 people. The quakes were felt in the capital Rome, sending residents running out of their houses and into the streets. The second was felt as far away as Venice in the far north, and Naples, south of the capital. / AFP / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture shows a destroyed building in the village of Visso, central Italy, on October 26, 2016. Twin earthquakes rocked central Italy on October 26, 2016 -- the second registering at a magnitude of 6.0 -- in the same region struck in August by a devastating tremor that killed nearly 300 people. The quakes were felt in the capital Rome, sending residents running out of their houses and into the streets. The second was felt as far away as Venice in the far north, and Naples, south of the capital. / AFP / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
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Police had blocked off the road to his home with a park bench, and Viola said a chapel beyond his house had collapsed.

The three quakes, about two hours apart, damaged several buildings, including Campi's late 14th century church, San Salvatore a Campi di Norcia, whose rose-windowed facade was reduced to rubble.

The quakes were probably a result of August's seismic break, Massimiliano Cocco from Italy's National Institute of Geophysics and Vulcanology told the Corriere della Sera newspaper.

The first tremor measured magnitude 5.4, causing many people to flee their homes and the second was stronger at 6.1 magnitude. A 4.9 aftershock came a couple hours after that, and dozens of weaker ones followed.

Rescue workers set up some 50 beds in a quake-proof building for people who could not sleep in their homes.

"The first tremor damaged buildings, with the second one we had collapses," fire department official, Rosario Meduri, said.

RELATED: See the destruction in Italy from earlier this year

31 PHOTOS
Earthquake devastates mountain towns in central Italy
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Earthquake devastates mountain towns in central Italy
PERUGIA, ITALY - AUGUST 24: Rubble surrounds damaged buildings after a strong earthquake hit San Pellegrino near Norcia on August 24, 201 in Perugia, Italy. Central Italy was struck by a powerful, 6.2-magnitude earthquake in the early hours, which has killed at least three people and devastated dozens of mountain villages. Numerous buildings had collapsed in communities close to the epicenter of the quake near the town of Norcia in the region of Umbria, witnesses told Italian media, with an increase in the death toll highly likely (Photo by Awakening/Getty Images)
PERUGIA, ITALY - AUGUST 24: Rubble surrounds damaged buildings after a strong earthquake hit San Pellegrino near Norcia on August 24, 201 in Perugia, Italy. Central Italy was struck by a powerful, 6.2-magnitude earthquake in the early hours, which has killed at least three people and devastated dozens of mountain villages. Numerous buildings had collapsed in communities close to the epicenter of the quake near the town of Norcia in the region of Umbria, witnesses told Italian media, with an increase in the death toll highly likely (Photo by Awakening/Getty Images)
Rescuers search amid rubble following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
A firefighter searches through debris of a collapsed building following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. A strong earthquake in central Italy reduced three towns to rubble as people slept early Wednesday, with reports that as many as 50 people were killed and hundreds injured as rescue crews raced to dig out survivors. (Italian Firefighters via AP)
A man walks amid rubbles after an earthquake struck in Amatrice Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks.(AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
PERUGIA, ITALY - AUGUST 24: People view a damaged building after a strong earthquake hit San Pellegrino near Norcia on August 24, 201 in Perugia, Italy. Central Italy was struck by a powerful, 6.2-magnitude earthquake in the early hours, which has killed at least three people and devastated dozens of mountain villages. Numerous buildings had collapsed in communities close to the epicenter of the quake near the town of Norcia in the region of Umbria, witnesses told Italian media, with an increase in the death toll highly likely (Photo by Awakening/Getty Images)
A man is rescued alive from the ruins following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Remo Casilli TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Rescuers work following an earthquake in Accumoli di Rieti, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Scherer
A man is carried away after been rescued alive from the ruins following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
A man is carried away after having been rescued alive from the ruins following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
A man is rescued alive from the ruins following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
A man is carried away after having been rescued alive from the ruins following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Remo Casilli
Rescuers and people walk along a road following an earthquake in Accumoli di Rieti, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Scherer
A damaged house is seen following an earthquake in Accumoli di Rieti, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Scherer
A bust is seen on the ground following an earthquake in Accumoli di Rieti, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Scherer
Rescuers work on a collapsed building following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF DEATH A body is carried away by rescuers following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca
A rescuer stands in front of a collapsed building following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Ciro De Luca TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A partially collapsed church is seen following an earthquake in Accumoli di Rieti, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Scherer
A collapsed house is seen following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini
Rescuers work in Amatrice, central Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016, where a magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. Turistic sign at right reads in Italian : "Amatrice, one of the most beautiful hamlets in Italy" . (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
Rescuers search amid rubble following an earthquake in Amatrice Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
Rescuers search amid rubble of collapsed houses following an earthquake in Pescara Del Tronto, Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
An injured man is rescued from a collapsed building following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. (AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca)
PERUGIA, ITALY - AUGUST 24: A damaged building is seen after a strong earthquake hit Amatrice on August 24, 201 in Perugia, Italy. Central Italy was struck by a powerful, 6.2-magnitude earthquake in the early hours, which has killed at least three people and devastated dozens of mountain villages. Numerous buildings had collapsed in communities close to the epicenter of the quake near the town of Norcia in the region of Umbria, witnesses told Italian media, with an increase in the death toll highly likely (Photo by Awakening/Getty Images)
AMATRICE, Aug. 24, 2016-- Photo taken on Aug. 24, 2016 shows damaged houses after the earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy. The death toll in a strong earthquake in central Italy has risen to 38, authorities said Wednesday. The 6.0 magnitude earthquake hit the city of Rieti at 3:32 a.m. Wednesday, with a shallow depth of 4.2 km, according to the National Institute of Volcanology and Seismology. (Xinhua/Jin Yu via Getty Images)
Rescue and emergency services personnel searches for victims with a dog in the central Italian village of Amatrice, on August 24, 2016 after a powerful earthquake rocked central Italy. A powerful earthquake rattled a remote area of central Italy on August 24, 2016, leaving at least 120 people dead and scenes of carnage in mountain villages. With 368 people injured and an unknown number trapped under rubble, the figure of dead and wounded was expected to rise in the wake of the pre-dawn quake, Prime Minister Matteo Renzi warned. / AFP / FILIPPO MONTEFORTE (Photo credit should read FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)
Volunteers join rescue and emergency services personnel searching for victims in the central Italian village of Amatrice, on August 24, 2016 after a powerful earthquake rocked central Italy. A powerful earthquake rattled a remote area of central Italy on August 24, 2016, leaving at least 120 people dead and scenes of carnage in mountain villages. With 368 people injured and an unknown number trapped under rubble, the figure of dead and wounded was expected to rise in the wake of the pre-dawn quake, Prime Minister Matteo Renzi warned. / AFP / FILIPPO MONTEFORTE (Photo credit should read FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)
PERUGIA, ITALY - AUGUST 24: A damaged building is seen after a strong earthquake hit Amatrice on August 24, 201 in Perugia, Italy. Central Italy was struck by a powerful, 6.2-magnitude earthquake in the early hours, which has killed at least three people and devastated dozens of mountain villages. Numerous buildings had collapsed in communities close to the epicenter of the quake near the town of Norcia in the region of Umbria, witnesses told Italian media, with an increase in the death toll highly likely (Photo by Awakening/Getty Images)
Two people hug each other next to the remains of a collapsed house following an earthquake in Pescara Del Tronto, Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
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He had come from southern Italy before Wednesday's tremors to help secure structures damaged by the August earthquake that hit some 50 km (30 miles) to the south.

While massive boulders that tumbled down the valley had yet to be cleared from the roads, on the whole there was a sense of relief.

The fact that the first earthquake was weaker than the second probably helped save lives because most people had already left their homes, Interior Minister Angelino Alfano said on state radio.

He also said that a decree now being voted on by parliament to pay for the immediate costs of the August tremor could be extended to cover the latest series of quakes.

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